April 8, 1927 (16th Parliament, 1st Session)

LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

I will come to that
later. When did suspicion become a ground for condemnation? Then further than that, such allegations or suspicions with regard to any citizen mean that he may be classed among the prohibited or undesirable class.
I have a good deal of sympathy with hon. members of this House who have given no particular attention to the act. It is very complicated and perhaps skilfully drawn. I am not quite sure-to give credit to those who are responsible for the drawing of the act-that those who drew the act quite recognized how far-reaching it was. In another part of the act there is a clause *which says that anyone who belongs to the prohibited classes cannot establish domicile in Canada. That means that it makes no difference whether a man has been here, one, five or twenty-five years; so long as he belongs to the prohibited class, it is impossible for him to establish what is technically known as domicile in Canada.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPEAL OP PROVISION FOR DEPORTATION OP CERTAIN CLASSES
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