February 1, 1926 (15th Parliament, 1st Session)

LIB

Walter Allan Hall

Liberal

Mr. HALL:

Before recess I had concluded my analysis of the statements which the leader of the opposition (Mr. Meighen) had made in his campaign speeches. From the analysis of those statements one would infer that the Conservative leader had established the fact that protection to the farmers of Canada would be of immense value to them, seeing that
Canada had to import twice as much as she raised of farm products. This would place the Canadian fanner in the same position as the manufacturers, with a monopoly of the home market. Mr. Speaker, does the leader of the opposition realize that this is not so? And by the way is this the man of his word, the man of veracity, the man of high purpose? And then did he mean to mislead the farmers at Wingham, at Chatham, at Charlottetown, and at Calgary? Was it to make them believe that Canada had no exportable surplus of farm products and, if so, that they would then acquire a monopoly of the domestic market if they were protected by the high tariff wall which he promised them in the event of his being returned' to power? Surely the right hon. gentleman knows that this is not the case. I need scarcely repeat here that 75 per cent of many of our farm products, such as wheat, live stock, and so on, are exported and sold in the world markets where the domestic price on these products is fixed. For example, last year we raised in Canada 422,000,000 bushels of wheat, of which it would require 54,000,000 bushels to feed the Canadian population of 9,000,000, and this would leave an exportable surplus of 368,000,000 bushels. Add to this all the foodstuffs represented in our exports of live stock and dairy products such as eggs, butter and cheese, besides many other articles, and it would take all the people of Canada all their time, day and] night, all the year, to consume these supplies. So that when the farmers come to realize that the Conservative leader's statement in his campaign speeches in regard to the shrinkage in the home market was, to say the least, very misleading-and that is a mild term'-doubtless they will marvel at some of the eulogies pronounced upon him by some of the members of this House. And mark you, this gentleman is one of the leaders of the Once great Conservative party.

Topic:   S90 COMMONS
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