May 23, 1921 (13th Parliament, 5th Session)

UNION

Robert Laird Borden

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Every one
understands perfectly well that evidence taken before a court of justice in Quebec or any other province is not evidence before a committee of this House. The question what is evidence before a committee of this House is, in the first place, a question for the committee itself and not for this committee. That committee must decide what is evidence, and if they go wrong, an appeal can be taken to this House. The point of order, as I understand it, in the first instance was this. Some hon. gentlemen on the other side desired to have this Bill referred back in order that evidence might be given for the purpose of disproving the conclusion at which the, committee of the Senate had arrived. I did not understand them to suggest that evidence taken before a court in Montreal would be evidence before this committee. They were giving the fact that evidence of that character had been given in the Superior Court of Montreal as evidence to show that evidence of the same character should be given before a committee of this House. Then the question was raised whether or not it would be competent for that committee to hear such evidence if it should be given in a proper way. My intervention was merely to say that I thought it was perfectly competent for that committee to hear that evidence if it were tendered in a proper way.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS FIRST AND SECOND READINGS
Full View