April 24, 1917 (12th Parliament, 7th Session)

CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister of Militia and Defence)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir EDWARD KEMP:

The hon. member for Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) yesterday asked for information in reference to money orders and parcels for Canadian prisoners of war. First, in regard to money orders, the answer is:
About the beginning of the year 1916, arrangements were made by the Chief Paymaster, London, England, through the Red Cross and Post Office, to forward small

amounts of pay to prisoners of war in Germany. The requests come from the men themselves by post card, and up to January, 1917, the remittances were made by post office order. This practice was discontinued at our request because no receipts or absolute guarantee that the money reached the men were obtained. Since January, 1917, the American Express made payments in cash to the men themselves and obtained individual receipts, at first through their own agents in Germany, and, since United States declared war, through Dutch agents of the American Express Company in Germany. Small sums are sent, not exceeding three pounds, which are charged to the men's accounts in London. I may add that the pay of prisoners of war is credited to the men's accounts, and accumulates, less these small remittances.

Topic:   MONEY ORDERS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.
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