March 2, 1911 (11th Parliament, 3rd Session)

LIB

Allen Bristol Aylesworth (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Sir ALLEN AYLESWORTH (Minister of Justice).

We are indebted to my hon. friend from St. Hyacinthe (Mr. Beaupar-lant) for the great attention he has given this matter' and I personally feel certainly under obligation to him for having seen fit to address the Chair in the English tongue, although, judging by the facility he has displayed in that language, that is no trouble to him. At the outset I wish to say that, in my ideas on this subject, I am not actuated by any feeling of sympathy for the civil servant who does not pay his debts. To pay his debts is a man's first duty, if indeed he toe not acting contrary to his duty in incurring debts, But none the less, I must say that I look upon a proposition to change the law regarding the garnishment of the salaries of civil servants as one of very dcaibtful expediency indeed. The question is simply one of expediency, and the condition of the law -which now prevents the seizure of the salary of civil servants is one which exists, not out of any consideration for these employees, but simply and wholly out of consideration for the public interests. It is entirely from that point of view that I question the desirability of making the change advocated by my hon. friend. I have seen it stated in legal works, as the reason for this rule of law, that the King cannot be brought into court against his own will, and, of course, we all recognize that it is the prerogative of the King to be sued only with his own assent upon the advice of his attorney general. That prero-

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-RECIPROCAL TRADE WITH THE UNITED STATES.
Subtopic:   SALARIES OF CIVIL SERVANTS.
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