February 18, 1910 (11th Parliament, 2nd Session)

LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

No, I think not. At the time of the difficulty between Canada and Germany, Canada was the only portion of the empire which had granted a preference to Great Britain; consequently Canada was the only portion of the empire which was brought into antagonism with Germany. My hon. friend had the impression that immediately after the denunciation of the old treaty a new treaty was made, giving to the various portions of the empire, except Canada, all the privileges that the former enjoyed. So far as I can ascertain, there was no treaty, but in another way the same result was brought about by an exchange of correspondence. Privileges which had formerly been extended to the British empire were extended to the British empire except in the case of Canada, and the reason for that was that Canada was the only portion of the empire which at that time granted a preference to Great Britain; consequently Germany had no quarrel with the rest of the empire, she quarrelled with Canada, and the result we know. So I have no doubt that in consequence of the contest with Canada, in consequence of the contention which Canada set up, and successfully set up, I think it is correct to say that Germany no longer insists unon the right of receiving the same treatment as other portions of the British empire; consequently to-day the other portions of the British empire would be receiving the full conventional tariff of Germany. That is my impression.

Topic:   COMMERCIAL AGREEMENT WITH GERMANY.
Full View