April 3, 1945 (19th Parliament, 6th Session)

PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CASE:

Our hundreds of miles of streams offer a fisherman's paradise. Our inland lakes and the great Georgian bay likewise offer respite to the busy man. In fact, we are a great tourist centre through which passes the Blue Water highway from Sarnia to Orillia, and we would like to improve our facilities to provide for the great friendly army who will invade our area for their holidays. Part of my riding is included in historic Huronia now being rapidly developed as an outstanding tourist attraction-more will be heard of Huronia soon. Tourists provide us with the greatest possible export market, an export market which brings the money into our centre, yet the goods and produce are consumed right at home.
I have in mind an immense conservation and reforestation scheme for my county. I should like to see a national park and game preserve developed. Reforestation provides a self-liquidating debt-and our possibilities are unlimited. However, we want better transportation facilities. In fact, as quickly as time will permit I hope to have a complete superficial survey of all our potentials.
I shall always remember my municipal experience. Municipal governments are indeed the bedrock of democracy-they are close to the people, they can interpret and anticipate the people's wishes, their desires and their needs. I intend to work closely with every municipal council in my riding. I can rely on their advice, and in a spirit of cooperation we will build for the future, sincere in a desire to leave behind something for which future generations can be grateful and proud.
May I venture the hope that we may all look beyond the immediate horizon, that we may appreciate how compact the world has become by modem communication and transportation, that we are citizens of that world society, and that we must accept certain obligations if we are to reap our fair reward.
An airport is very necessary somewhere in the vicinity of Owen Sound or Meaford. We must be on the air map of the future. In the meantime, Owen Sound has had completed on its own initiative a survey of a possible
aiport site. This area offers tremendous possibilities of national importance, as it will accommodate land, amphibian, and sea planes. We also need improved railroad facilities. I look upon our railroads as a national necessity, particularly in time of war; and surely in view of our experience in the past our future development should have the defence of the nation in mind. A great improvement could be secured by an outlet between Owen Sound and Meaford. Being the end of the line has restricted and hampered the development of both of these centres.
It was always difficult for me to understand why some naval training stations were located in rather unusual areas when we have such splendid natural facilities at Owen Sound, Meaford and Thornbury. Owen Sound boasts of one of the finest natural harbours on the great lakes. It is the last to freeze up in the fall and the first to open in the spring. This year set a record when boats cleared on March 24. However, the harbour facilities have been neglected. We need improved retaining walls and docking facilities. I propose to ask the department to make an inspection of both Owen Sound and Meaford harbours, so that a proper sum may be placed in the estimates to maintain and improve this great national asset.
Owen Sound, the scenic city, the city of the Greys, has a rehabilitation committee composed largely of veterans of the first war. They are seeking to provide for the rehabilitation of our armed service personnel, and the local branch of the Canadian Legion is doing a commendable piece of work. Wherever the legion have club house facilities, I would urge the government to seek their full cooperation. They understand the veteran's problem, and the government could quite properly designate certain legion members as agents of the department, and pay them accordingly.
Owen Sound also has a post-war planning committee to programme public works and civic improvements. However, like most planning bodies, they are looking to the government for over-all leadership. The government of Ontario-now appealing for a new mandate-has already consulted municipal authorities about post-war planning. They now await a dominion-provincial conference to coordinate plans. This conference is long overdue, yet I am sure hon. gentlemen opposite will appreciate how necessary it is if our planning is to be effective and to avoid overlapping. The county of Grey has also named a rehabilitation committee, having as its object the restoration of our armed service personnel to normal life and activity.
War Appropriation

I hope, Mr. Speaker, my reference to my riding has been reasonably interesting. After all, I represent North Grey-the only voice they have-and while I shall willingly address myself to problems of national concern, still I must not forget the people who sent me here. No organization is stronger than its weakest link, and I want our link strong and virile.
The town of Meaford is one of the prettiest in Ontario. There is where they hold fishing derbies. Their great fleet of fishing boats attracts thousands of tourists and visitors annually; indeed the industry is of national importance. Meaford is also the centre of apple growing and the home of thriving industries, all working, I am happy to say, at full capacity. In nearby St. Vincent township is the tank range, with a terrain said to be more suitable for this type of training than any other in Canada. Thus my riding has provided the facilities to train men for a most vital and important type of warfare.
Owen Sound has a civic auditorium arena. It is a centre for young people, and has played a great part in minimizing juvenile delinquency. I recommend to all hon. members that they do all they can to promote healthy play-centres in their communities. It will pay big dividends in citizenship. Give the young people an opportunity to expend their pent-up energy in good healthy sport and recreation. A strong, healthy, robust child is indeed an asset to the nation. Keep them playing at good clean sport; teach them to play the game. Life's problems will not be so great if they are healthy in mind and body.
Thornbury, surrounded by Collingwood township, is the centre of Ontario's finest orchard district. They have storage facilities for the product, and at both Thornbury and Clarksburg are processing plants. This to my mind is important, as we should constantly seek to process our natural products at home. Processing the product provides work for local people, and the finished product is more easily stored and can be marketed more regularly than in its more perishable state.
Owen Sound is flanked by Sydenham, Keppel, Sarawak, Derby and Holland townships, and by the village of Shallow Lake- once the centre of a sizable cement industry. Euphrasia township boasts of the Eugenia electric power development, with head water three times the height of Niagara Falls. Osprey township rounds out a great riding, of which I am justly proud-thirteen municipalities in all, in twelve of which the Progressive Conservative stand on man-power was endorsed by majorities.

I should like, Mr. Speaker, to make a passing reference to Poland, as a matter of record. In the years 1941 and 1942 we had stationed in Owen Sound the Polish Legion. We grew to have a very fine impression and appreciation of these splendid people. Everyone knows how much they have suffered, and surely they have steadfastly sought to contribute their all. I sincerely hope that the post-war world1 settlements arrived at will be to the satisfaction of all concerned, and I have faith and confidence to believe that it will be so.
No remarks from a newly elected member of a great party would be complete without some reference to his leader. I want to say that I believe that John Bracken has sought to prepare himself for a great task as has no other leader before. His contacts from coast to coast in Canada have surely fitted him for the high office of prime minister, and I do believe that he will discharge his duties with honour and distinction to himself and to the people of Canada.
As one who has a deep appreciation of all those who seek to serve in public office, may I say that I know my immediate predecessor from North Grey was respected by all members of this house, just as we at home respect and honour him. I know that you will all regret that his health has not shown the improvement his friends had hoped for, but I feel I can carry from this chamber the best wishes of all for his future comfort and1 happiness. Mr. W. P. Telford served North Grey for a total of almost fifteen years, and his late father was one time a member of parliament for our constituency. I should like to pay just tribute to one who has served so long and who enjoyed in marked degree the confidence of his fellowmen and women.
I have appreciated, Mr. Speaker, the many courtesies extended to me by members and officials of this house, and I hope they will bear with me while I find my way about and seek to discharge my duties to my constituency of North Grey and to the people of Canada.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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