March 4, 1943 (19th Parliament, 4th Session)

NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, this is a singularly happy occasion. Our party in this house welcomes the opportunity of associating ourselves with the well chosen words of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) in his messages to the Prime Minister of Great Britain and the President of the United States. The Prime Minister's reference to the successes of the arms of the united nations on land, on sea and in the air I think is most appropriate at this time.
The Prime Minister of Great Britain, the Right Honourable Winston Spencer Churchill, took office in the United Kingdom at what may be regarded as one of the darkest hours in the whole history of the British empire, and by his words, his example and his tremendous courage inspired the people of Britain to heights which perhaps they had never before attained, at the same time extending his influence to every part of the democratic world. He came to power at a critical time; and at least it can be said to the credit of democracy that when critical situations arise men with the ability and capacity to meet them are brought to the fore. To Mr. Churchill democracy owes a debt it will never be able to repay. His restoration to health is a great relief to the people of Canada and to all those fighting in the cause of freedom and righteousness the world over.
The President of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt, came to power also at a critical time, not during a war but at perhaps the most trying period that democracy has ever experienced in time of peace, and what is applicable to Mr. Churchill in time of war may be applied in equal measure to the President of the United States with regard to the difficulties which he surmounted in days of peace. I am sure all hon. members of this house who have been following
the life of the President of the United States will remember that in addition to his wartime achievements, which have been magnificent, he has proved to be a great friend of the little man in the country which he serves so well. His work, in close association with the Prime Minister of Great Britain and the leaders of the other allied nations, I think is understood and appreciated more than words can express, and on this tenth anniversary of his first inauguration I as leader of the Progressive Conservative party in this house want to add my words to those which have been uttered by the Prime Minister. This afternoon, Mr. Speaker, we in this house are unanimous in greeting the two great champions of democracy.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS LEADERS
Subtopic:   MESSAGES TO MR. CHURCHILL ON RECOVERY FROM ILLNESS AND MR. ROOSEVELT ON TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF FIRST INAUGURATION AS PRESIDENT
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