May 17, 1939 (18th Parliament, 4th Session)

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Again I can only say that the country which has attempted to do more along this line than any other is Great Britain. There is a reason why it should be easier to carry it out there than in other countries, and that is the small percentage of the population engaged in the production of food products. I think it would be correct to say that at the outside not more than ten per cent of the people are producing hogs. But all the people of Great Britain are eating bacon and pork products. If there was any possibility of establishing what might be called a guaranteed price, it should be in that country. Hon. members who had the opportunity of listening to the present Minister of Agriculture in Great Britain when he was journeying across this country from Australia before he became minister will recall that at all meetings which he addressed there was considerable discussion of this very matter of setting quotas and prices and everything of that kind in order to regulate the production of food products, not only in Great Britain but throughout the empire. I am sorry I have not on my desk at the moment the report of his last speech in the old country, but he stated most definitely that a guaranteed price was an impossibility. He cited one or two cases in which it had been tried, but it was found impossible to maintain the price. He said that the best that possibly could be done was to ensure some figure below which the price of the product would not fall.

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
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