May 17, 1939 (18th Parliament, 4th Session)

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Some one says "so it is" and that is true. We convince a group of people that this is so; in other words we create a demand for our bacon. But then we run into a period of a few months when our bacon is not available, and these people go back to some other kind of bacon. They form a taste for that other kind; they like it; they say, "We can get this all the time, and now we know how to handle it," and we have to go through a process of creating a market all over again. When our supplies were in proportion to the market we had created we were able to get to within two shillings of the price of the best Danish bacon. Then when we reached the other extreme a few months later and supplied more bacon than was required for the market we had developed, our price dropped considerably.
Live Stock and Poultry

So that our problem is one of producing, as nearly as that can be done, a constant supply of the best type of Canadian bacon for the British market, thereby retaining the customers who can consume what we supply, trying not to create a larger market than we can satisfy at all times but to keep our supply equal to the demand at all times, while gradually building up both our market and our exports year by year. A great deal of educational work is required in Canada as well as in the old country if we are to bring about that result.

Topic:   LIVE STOCK AND POULTRY
Subtopic:   SUPERVISION OVER STOCKYARD OPERATIONS- GRADING, INSPECTION AND MARKETING
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