February 11, 1936 (18th Parliament, 1st Session)

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon.
friends opposite are groaning a bit, but may I ask them just how, in seeking to be "helpful", their leader began his discourse yesterday. The first thing he did was to say that no doubt, as Prime Minister, I should find considerable difficulty in having so large a following. It was very natural that he should make a remark of that kind. Heaven knows with a very much smaller following he had enough difficulty to cope with all the time he was in office. The following he has behind him at the present moment is eloquent of the results of difficulties and discussions which he had at different times with sopae of his colleagues and members of his party.
The leader of the opposition was at particular pains to try to tell this house what had taken place during the formation of the present government. I heard him say repeatedly, when he was on this side of the house, that matters which pertained to the cabinet, and to his own party, were their business and nobody else's, and that it might be just as well for other people to mind their own business. I give him back his own words at this time. May I say that I think it ill became him, knowing the problems that face any first minister in the formation of a cabinet, to seek, at the very beginning of a parliamentary session, to create prejudice, not only as between different members of a party, but as between different parts of the country, by an appeal to race such as he sought to make in the remarks he offered at that time.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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