June 17, 2019

NDP

Pierre-Luc Dusseault

New Democratic Party

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, will we really be surprised if tomorrow they put the interests of big oil ahead of the interests of Canadians? I do not think so.

Canada has never seen such a huge inequality. The Liberals brag about having lowered taxes for the middle class, but the wealthiest middle-class Canadians are the ones who benefit.

Yesterday our leader presented an ambitious plan to finally reduce inequality that would make the richest 1% pay a 1% wealth tax on wealth over $20 million. We would reinvest these billions of dollars in the services that people truly need.

When will the Liberals make ultra-rich Canadians pay their fair share?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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LIB

Bill Morneau

Liberal

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, a fully functional tax system is very important.

We started by cutting taxes for the middle class. This was very important. At the same time, we changed the tax rates for the wealthiest Canadians.

What are we seeing now? Middle-class Canadians are better off, and for four years now, the average family has been pocketing $2,000 more.

We will continue to make life easier for the middle class in the future.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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NDP

Peter Julian

New Democratic Party

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, it is the folks right behind the minister who gained the most from the Liberal tax cut, because people would have to earn an MP's salary in order to get the maximum benefit.

If we want to tackle inequalities in this country, we need to take bold action. We need to make the richest of the 1% of Canadians pay a 1% tax on their wealth above $20 million. That would mean we could invest in solutions that Canadians need, like pharmacare, dental care and an affordable place to call home.

When will the Liberals stop siding with the ultra-rich of our country and put everyday Canadians first for a change?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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LIB

Bill Morneau

Liberal

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite might not have been paying attention to what we really did.

It was the $45,000 to $90,000 tax bracket that we reduced by 7%. We also put in place the Canada child benefit, which was means-tested, which means significant benefits went to families at lower and middle income. It was means-tested after $150,000 of family income.

At the same time, though, we raised taxes on the top 1%. These measures together have led us to be in a very positive economic situation, with the lowest rate of unemployment in history in our country, which is a positive situation. We are going to keep working in the future for the middle class.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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CPC

Alain Rayes

Conservative

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Parliamentary Budget Officer confirmed last week that the Liberal government's plan just does not cut it. He has proven that under their plan, the Liberals will have to increase fuel prices by more than 23¢ per litre, because of their carbon tax. Only the Liberals believe that raising taxes could be an effective plan.

My question for the Prime Minister is simple. Why do he and his colleagues here in the House want to increase fuel prices by 23¢ per litre on the backs of Canadians?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the question that the hon. member put on the floor of the House of Commons is grossly misleading. He knows that the PBO report presumes that no action will be taken beyond measures that are currently in place in order to hit our targets. We will hit our targets. To date, we have put forward a price on pollution. We are going to make sure that 90% of our electricity comes from non-emitting resources from 2030. We have made the largest investment in the history of public transit.

I have taken hundreds of questions in this chamber, and not one of them from a Conservative MP asking us to do more. When it comes to the environment, the Conservative Party of Canada cannot be trusted.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Alain Rayes

Conservative

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, since this Liberal government came to power, the cost of living for Canadians has skyrocketed. That is quite the coincidence, much like the deficit. Eighty per cent of Canadian families started paying more taxes since the Liberal government came to power. Every year, $800 more is coming out of their pockets.

I would therefore like to repeat my question to the Prime Minister. Why does he want to burden Canadians even more and increase fuel prices by 23¢ per litre?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, with respect, when it comes to affordability, we have no lessons to learn from the Conservatives, who opposed the Canada child benefit which put more money in the pockets of 9 out of ten low- and middle-income families. They voted against cutting taxes for middle-class Canadians and voted for keeping them low for the richest 1%.

I have answered so many questions when it comes to climate, but the Conservatives do not seem to listen. They will not listen to Conservative stalwarts like Preston Manning. They will not listen to the Nobel Prize winner in economics. I would urge them to listen to the Pope, who this past weekend said, “For too long we have collectively failed to listen to the fruits of scientific analysis” and called carbon pricing essential.

It is time to get with the program.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Alain Rayes

Conservative

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the facts speak for themselves: the Liberals cut the public transit tax credit and the children's fitness and arts tax credit. What is more, the Prime Minister created a deficit on the backs of our grandchildren, who will end up paying the bill one day.

Once again Canadians, honest workers, will end up paying more taxes because of this government.

Why is this Prime Minister increasing the price of gas by another 23¢ with his lousy carbon tax?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, they want to talk about adding costs for the next generations. Inaction on climate change is the thing that is going to lead to the greatest cost for future generations. Every time we propose a measure to deal with the environment, the Conservatives oppose it. They opposed our price on pollution. They opposed our largest investment in history on public transit. For God's sake, when we announced we were going to be banning harmful single-use plastics and gave them an opportunity to support the environment or garbage, they chose garbage.

The Conservatives cannot be trusted when it comes to the environment.

It is time to get with the 21st century. Climate change is real, and we have found a way to make life more affordable for families at the same time.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Geoff Regan

Liberal

The Speaker

I think the hon. parliamentary secretary meant “for goodness' sake”. He has gone from the pope to a higher power.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, speaking of the pope, it is time that they made a confession over there.

They have been keeping a deep dark secret. If the Liberal government is re-elected, as the PBO has pointed out, the carbon tax will add a full 23¢ to the cost of gas. This is the PBO, whose word is much more reliable than that of a government that is missing its day to balance the budget by two decades.

Will the member unburden his soul and confess to Canadians the real price that he will add to a litre of gas if re-elected?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
Permalink
LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, when it comes to the recent PBO report, the hon. member knows that it presumes no further action will be taken on climate change. I suggest that the hon. member is projecting what we should expect to see in the Conservative plan due to come out this week. I would also invite the hon. member to review the prior report of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, which indicated that 8 out of ten families in his province will be left better off as a result of our plan.

We are following the advice of the leading experts in the world, including last year's winner of the Nobel Prize in economics. If the member will not believe me, not believe the Pope and not believe the Nobel Prize winner, I suggest that there is no convincing him.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the member still would not answer the simple question of how much gas prices will go up when the Liberal carbon tax is fully and finally implemented.

The PBO went on CTV last week and said that the Liberals' plan for the carbon tax would have to be twice as high as they now admit and five times as high as it now is, leading to gas prices that would rise 23¢ a litre. If the PBO is wrong, then how much will gas prices go up under the Liberal plan?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. member had actually read the PBO report, he would have noticed that he pointed out this was the least expensive option. I expect that the Conservatives' plan will mirror that of Doug Ford's, and I am curious that their strategy is to cozy up to the Premier of Ontario. However, we know that it is going to lead to a worse record in terms of emissions reduction and a greater cost for families. We have been transparent about our plan. The price will increase to $50 a tonne by 2020. I will show him the website afterward. Until then, I will assume that their plan will mirror Doug Ford's and will make life more expensive for families.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, there we have it: 23¢ a litre is the minimum cost that the Liberals would impose on Canadian motorists. I think Canadians would like to know the maximum cost of the Liberal carbon tax. He is right. The PBO did say that the Liberal carbon tax could actually be higher than the $100 a tonne. It speaks about provincial politics. We know that Kathleen Wynne is their model. She lied in four elections about coming tax increases. She increased the cost of energy. If they are following that model, why will they not come clean before the election and tell us how much it will cost in higher gas prices if the Liberals are re-elected?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
Permalink
LIB

Sean Fraser

Liberal

Mr. Sean Fraser (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the hon. member for the opportunity to clarify. As the Parliamentary Budget Officer pointed out, the climate action incentive makes life more affordable for his constituents. The whole system works by returning the rebates directly to households. A typical family of four, in the hon. member's own constituency, would have received $307 off of their taxes this year. I am curious that the Conservative Party of Canada has now adopted an approach towards politics that would see families pay more tax. It comes as no surprise to me after a number of years of watching its members vote against the Canada child benefit, the middle-class tax cut and now against a price on pollution that will reduce emissions and make life more affordable.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
Permalink
NDP

Karine Trudel

New Democratic Party

Ms. Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the health care system is no longer responsive to Canadians' needs.

It is not okay that some people are covered for dental and vision care and others are not. The Liberals' targeted approach simply does not provide the desired results. The NDP is proposing extending health care coverage to protect people from head to toe, while offering Quebec and the other provinces the chance to opt out with full compensation.

Can the government follow the NDP's example and commit to extending medical coverage to include dental and vision care?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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LIB

Ginette Petitpas Taylor

Liberal

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to be part of a government that makes historic investments in health in order to respond to the needs of Canadians today and in the future. We have invested more than $11 million in mental health care and home care.

We will continue to work with the provinces and territories to ensure that Canadians continue to be proud of their health care system.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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NDP

Daniel Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Daniel Blaikie (Elmwood—Transcona, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, that was not really an answer to the question. It was over 20 years ago that the Liberals first promised pharmacare. They have had three majority governments since then, and their common criticism of the NDP is that we are in too big of a hurry. We are in a hurry. We think it should not have taken 20 years for Canadians to get affordable access to drugs. We are not prepared to apologize for that in the least. We also know, because the science tells us, that preventative access to things like dental care and eye care are less expensive in the long term and improve quality of life. Will they commit today to moving forward on that?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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June 17, 2019