June 13, 2019

CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the minister is doing exactly what she said she would do. She will just repeat and repeat something, even if it is not true, so people will totally believe it.

The facts are out. The Parliamentary Budget Officer says the carbon tax would have to be 400% higher than the Liberals have admitted. The reality is that would mean a painful 25¢ a litre tax on gas.

I am asking a simple yes or no question. Are the Liberals planning a painful 25¢ a litre tax on gas?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Catherine McKenna

Liberal

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the answer is no, and the member is misleading Canadians.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, it comes directly out of the Parliamentary Budget Officer's report. If we simply take his numbers, we arrive at a 25¢ a litre tax on gas. That is the plan, as the Parliamentary Budget Officer has laid it out, and it works out to $1,000 for an Ontario family, far more than the tiny, smaller than advertised rebate cheques that the Liberals sent out prior to the election.

If the minister wants to deny it, why does she not just tell us how much the price of gas will go up when the carbon tax applies at $100 a tonne?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Catherine McKenna

Liberal

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, let me set it out plainly for the member opposite. I hope he will listen. We are taking ambitious action on climate change in everything from pricing pollution to phasing out renewables. We are also taking other measures that are not reflected in the Parliamentary Budget Office report, from phasing out plastic and tackling plastic pollution to the incentives for electric vehicles that we just announced, and from doubling nature to planting trees.

We are committed to meeting our international obligations and doing more, but what Canadians want to know is whether the party opposite understands we have a climate emergency that we need to be taking—

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB
CPC

Gérard Deltell

Conservative

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the cat is out of the bag. Yesterday, once again, the Prime Minister stood in his place and misled Canadians, saying that he would meet the Paris targets. That is not true.

The Parliamentary Budget Officer concluded today that Canada will not meet those targets and, worse still, that the Liberals will have to raise their Liberal tax from $20 to $100 if they want to meet those targets. That is five times higher than the current Liberal tax.

Can the Minister of Environment tell us how much Canadians will have to pay with the Liberal carbon tax?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Catherine McKenna

Liberal

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, that member should be ashamed of his comments, given that he is from Quebec, where there is a price on pollution that works. What is happening in Quebec? Quebec is reducing its greenhouse gas emissions and growing its economy. It has the largest clean technology sector in the country.

I hope the member opposite will step up, as Quebeckers want, and present an ambitious climate action plan to meet our targets.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
Permalink
CPC

Gérard Deltell

Conservative

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased and honoured to stand in the House with a document prepared by the Quebec ministry of the environment, which indicates that between 2014 and 2016 the carbon exchange did not lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. I cannot say in the House that the minister lied, but she did not tell the truth.

I have a simple question for the minister: how much more will Canadians have to pay for gas?

Will gas go up by 25¢ per litre, yes or no?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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LIB

Catherine McKenna

Liberal

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am surprised to hear the opposition member's comments.

Is he telling Quebeckers that he no longer supports Quebec's carbon exchange? Is the opposition member saying that Quebec should not put a price on pollution? Does the opposition member believe that we cannot do as Quebec is doing and grow our economy while tackling climate change? Has the opposition member not seen the millions of young people in the streets calling for concrete measures to deal with climate change? I know that Quebec members of the House know this.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Carbon Pricing
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NDP

Jagmeet Singh

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jagmeet Singh (Burnaby South, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, members democratically elected to the House voted to pass a bill that would work towards reconciliation. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People would be enshrined in Canadian law. That would improve the lives of indigenous people.

Members of the House also voted for a bill that would ensure that federal judges receive sexual assault training. That would improve the lives of sexual assault survivors.

These bills are now being held up in the unelected Senate. It is a travesty of our democracy.

What is the Prime Minister doing to ensure that the will of the people is defended and these bills are passed?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Senate
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LIB

Carolyn Bennett

Liberal

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the government is moving forward on key legislative initiatives to implement the UN declaration, including the legislation on languages and child and family services.

We also supported Bill C-262 as an important next step.

We too are deeply disappointed to see that the Conservative leader continues to allow his caucus members in the other place to use partisan delay tactics to prevent this important bill from moving forward, blatantly ignoring the unanimous motion passed by the House.

Reconciliation with indigenous peoples should not be subject—

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Senate
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LIB

Geoff Regan

Liberal

The Speaker

Order. Members need to remember to listen. No matter whether they like what they hear or not, they still have to hear it. The Chair has to hear it to know whether it is out of order. I would appreciate some help in that regard.

The hon. member for Burnaby South.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Senate
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NDP

Jagmeet Singh

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jagmeet Singh (Burnaby South, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Sherbrooke was approached by a man who said he was unable to pay for his three prescriptions. He could afford only one of the three and his pharmacist had to tell him which one was the most important. People like him have been waiting decades to have access to the medicines they need.

Are the Liberals going to keep catering to big pharma or will they stand by Canadians and finally bring in a publicly delivered universal pharmacare plan?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Pharmacare
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LIB

Ginette Petitpas Taylor

Liberal

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, let us be clear: our government is committed to ensuring that all Canadians have access to a national pharmacare plan.

We will be developing this plan, and to do that we need to work with the provinces, territories, the health care sector, indigenous peoples and all Canadians. We will not stop working on this file. We want to ensure that all Canadians have access to the drugs they need.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Pharmacare
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NDP

Jagmeet Singh

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jagmeet Singh (Burnaby South, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday's report confirms 40 years of commissions and studies. It confirms that Canada needs a single-payer, publicly delivered, universal, comprehensive pharmacare for all.

Afer four years, what does the Liberal government have to show? The answer is nothing. In fact, the Liberals have shown that they would rather help big pharma over people who have to make tough choices between medication and buying their groceries: tough choices that may mean they end up in hospital because they cannot afford their medication.

Why will the Liberals not do what is necessary? Why will they not get out of the way and let New Democrats implement a plan?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Pharmacare
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LIB

Ginette Petitpas Taylor

Liberal

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, let us be very clear. Our government is firmly committed to making sure all Canadians have access to a national pharmacare program, and the work is well under way.

Over the past two years, we have been working to make sure we lower the price of drugs. In budget 2019, we have invested monies to make sure the funding is in place to create a Canadian drug agency.

We are in the process of modernizing the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board in order to once again make sure we lower the cost of drugs and are able to move forward with this program.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Pharmacare
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NDP

Jagmeet Singh

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jagmeet Singh (Burnaby South, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government continues to choose the richest people at the top over people struggling to get by. They chose big pharma and protecting its profits over people who cannot afford their medications. They chose to help big telecom and allowed it to gouge Canadians on their cellphone bills. They chose to help big polluters continue to poison our planet. They let the richest off the hook on taxes.

The reality is that the government does not care about people. Why is it that it continues to help the people at the top, the rich, instead of people working hard to get by?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Government Policies
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LIB

Marc Garneau

Liberal

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about affordability. The very first thing we did was reduce taxes on the middle class, for nine million Canadians. The second thing we did was introduce the Canada child benefit, which put more money into the pockets of middle-class families. We have demonstrated that over the past three and a half years, we have put $2,000 more in the pockets of middle-class Canadian families of four. That is what we are doing with respect to affordability.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Government Policies
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CPC

Candice Bergen

Conservative

Hon. Candice Bergen (Portage—Lisgar, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, just like everything else the Prime Minister touches, his “no more pipelines” bill, Bill C-69, has turned into a dumpster fire, ticking off and alienating the majority of provinces. National unity is at stake, but instead of taking the premiers' concerns seriously, the Prime Minister keeps insulting them with his “I am the boss and I know best” attitude.

Does the Prime Minister realize the harm he is doing and what is at stake? He is putting his ego and his own political interests ahead of national unity.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Natural Resources
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LIB

Catherine McKenna

Liberal

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, we have a $500-billion economic opportunity for major projects in the next decade. Under Stephen Harper, under gutted rules, good projects were unable to go ahead, we did not listen to indigenous peoples and we did not protect the environment.

We are very proud of the better rules we brought in through Bill C-69. We listened to senators and accepted amendments that made the rules better.

We can protect the environment. We can partner with indigenous peoples. We can do all of that while ensuring that good projects go ahead in a timely way. I would ask the parties opposite to support this good—

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Natural Resources
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June 13, 2019