June 15, 2017

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Brigitte Sansoucy

NDP

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy

Mr. Speaker, the parliamentary secretary said that they are going to continue.

Unfortunately, last week, we learned that the Liberals are continuing to sign new treaties. They signed a new treaty with another tax haven, Cook Islands. It will now be possible to bring tax-free profits back to Canada. This new tax treaty is much too flexible and mostly favours the wealthy. It will create more tax evasion than we have already. The government is not cracking down on existing tax evasion. It is creating more. Even if the government recovers money by investing in the fight against tax evasion, it is losing even more by signing a new tax treaty. It makes no sense at all. How can the government claim to be taking action against tax evasion while doing the opposite? Why is it using all its resources to track tax criminals while giving them the tools they need to carry out their schemes by signing this sort of treaty? I am thinking of the poor employees at the CRA who have more work to do and whose jobs become even more complicated every time a new agreement is signed.

When will the government actually get to the root of the problem and revise the tax treaties signed with tax havens?

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
Subtopic:   Canada Revenue Agency
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LIB

Kamal Khera

Liberal

Ms. Kamal Khera

Mr. Speaker, as I said, the CRA is currently reviewing its policies around making a voluntary disclosure. People applying to use the program who have used it before may find that the door is now permanently closed to them. Tax cheats are running out of options, and it will only become harder for them going forward.

I want to close by informing this House that settlement agreements are not the soft landing that many believe them to be, and they are in no way an amnesty. When the CRA enters a settlement agreement, it will assess tax retroactively, going back as many years as possible, which is often a decade or more. Taxpayers who have reached a settlement agreement must accept CRA's calculation of the tax and compounded interest on all taxes owed, and they waive their right to appeal or object to this calculation.

Our government continues to go after every dollar that is owed by high-wealth individuals, and it has more resources now than ever before. Once again, I believe that this is what Canadians expect of their government, and that is exactly what we will continue to deliver for them.

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
Subtopic:   Canada Revenue Agency
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CPC

Bruce Stanton

Conservative

The Deputy Speaker

The motion to adjourn the House is now deemed to have been adopted. Accordingly, this House stands adjourned until later this day at 10 a.m., pursuant to Standing Order 24(1).

(The House adjourned at 12:04 a.m.)

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
Subtopic:   Canada Revenue Agency
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LIB

Geoff Regan

Liberal

The Speaker

I have the honour to lay upon the table the annual reports on the Access to Information and Privacy Acts of the Commissioner of Lobbying, for the year 2016-17. Pursuant to Standing Order 108(3)(h), these reports are deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and Ethics.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Commissioner of Lobbying
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LIB

Geoff Regan

Liberal

The Speaker

I have the honour, pursuant to section 38 of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act, to lay upon the table the case report of the Public Service Integrity Commissioner in the matter of an investigation into allegations of wrongdoing. This report is deemed permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.

I also have the honour, pursuant to section 38 of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act, to lay upon the table the report of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2017. This report is deemed to have been permanently referred to the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Public Sector Integrity Commissioner
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LIB

Kevin Lamoureux

Liberal

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to four petitions.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Government Response to Petitions
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LIB

Jane Philpott

Liberal

Hon. Jane Philpott

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-55, An Act to amend the Oceans Act and the Canada Petroleum Resources Act.

(Motion deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Oceans Act
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CPC

Pierre Paul-Hus

Conservative

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian delegation of the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association respecting its participation at the Defence and Security Committee meeting held in Washington, D.C., United States of America, January 20 to 23, 2017.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Interparliamentary Delegations
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LIB

Leona Alleslev

Liberal

Ms. Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian NATO Parliamentary Association delegation respecting its participation at the joint visit of the Sub-Committee on Transatlantic Defence and Security Cooperation, Sub-Committee on Transatlantic Economic Relations, and the officers of the Sub-Committee on the Transatlantic Relations in Svalbard, Norway, May 9 to 11, 2017.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Interparliamentary Delegations
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LIB

Stephen Fuhr

Liberal

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on National Defence, in relation to a study of North American defence entitled “The Readiness of Canada's Naval Forces”.

I would like to thank our clerk, Elizabeth Kingston, and our analysts, Melissa Radford and Martin Auger.

This is a unanimous report.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   National Defence
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LIB

Mark Eyking

Liberal

Hon. Mark Eyking (Sydney—Victoria, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the seventh report of the Standing Committee of International Trade, entitled “The Canadian Steel Industry's Ability to Compete Internationally”. Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

I would also like to thank our clerk, our analysts, and especially our committee. We have a hard-working committee. We do a lot of travel across the country and internationally. We do well for this country when we do our business.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   International Trade
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CPC

Gerry Ritz

Conservative

Hon. Gerry Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I do not disagree with what the chair of the committee said, but I just want to underscore a couple of points that we put in our attached report to maintain the access we have with our great trading partner, the U.S.

The problem we have is that, as these Liberals move forward with a China free trade agreement at some point, the first thing China asks for as a precondition is market economy status. What that does is change the whole atmosphere around countervail, dumping, and so on, as it is doing with steel.

The other thing is that we need a study on the cost of the carbon tax and how that will keep us out of the American market simply because we are adding that $50 a tonne on a number of different aspects of steel production.

Those two things need to be underscored in this report. I hope that the government will respond to those, especially, when it does.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   International Trade
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LIB

Deb Schulte

Liberal

Mrs. Deborah Schulte (King—Vaughan, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the eighth report of the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development, entitled “Healthy Environment, Healthy Canadians, Healthy Economy: Strengthening the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999”.

I want to thank all the witnesses who came before the committee and those who sent briefs to share their expertise with us. I also want to give special thanks to the clerk and the analysts who helped us to sort through all the advice, write the report, and bring forward recommendations. We had many thoughtful discussions, engaging all members of the committee. I am glad to report that we did agree on many of the recommendations, despite not being able to develop a unanimous report.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Environment and Sustainable Development
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CPC

Jim Eglinski

Conservative

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative members of the environment and sustainable development committee have filed a dissenting report on the Canadian Environmental Protection Act study. The Conservative members believe that had the study been more focused and had more time been allocated to receiving critical testimony, the report could have represented another step forward in improving the rigour of Canada's environmental protection regime. Sadly, the majority's recommendations are, in many cases, not adequately borne out by supporting testimony and evidence before the committee. The recommendations appear to reflect an ideological bias in favour of a wholesale remake of Canada's environmental protection regime that could have profoundly chilling effects on Canada's economic competitiveness.

In closing, I would like to also thank the clerk and analysts for their work, and I would like to thank all the committee members. We actually worked quite well together, although we had differences of opinion.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Environment and Sustainable Development
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LIB

Hedy Fry

Liberal

Hon. Hedy Fry (Vancouver Centre, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the sixth report of the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, entitled “Disruption: Change and Churning in Canada's Media Landscape”. I want to thank the committee for working so well together. We had very important debates. We were passionate about this, and I want to thank the clerk and the analysts for trying to translate that into some kind of coherent sense. There was a difference of opinion, however.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests that the government table a comprehensive response to this report.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Canadian Heritage
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CPC

Peter Van Loan

Conservative

Hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative members of the heritage committee wish to present a supplementary report, as our view is very much in contrast with that of the Liberal majority. Overwhelmingly, the recommendations of the majority members on the committee have embraced an effort to turn back the clock in the media world and keep things the way they were to try to replicate the ways of the analogue world in a new digital world.

This is a fool's errand; the world is changing and change brings disruption. Some see this disruption as a problem, but higher taxes and government control of the news is not the answer to the problem. Efforts to turn back the clock to an earlier age are doomed to meet with failure. With the transformations of the digital world, the media are genuinely democratizing for the first time. No longer is a citizen's influence limited to choosing which newspaper to read or which television news to watch. Now every citizen can use the online digital world to report news and opinions and distribute them. This is a welcome environment.

The committee is seeking new ways to tax Canadians to pay for efforts by the government to involve itself in the production of news for Canadians. Canadians do not need more and new taxes. The Conservative members of the committee strongly oppose any proposal to implement a Netflix tax, Internet tax, or any other news tax on Canadians.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Canadian Heritage
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Georgina Jolibois

NDP

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, NDP)

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-361, An Act to amend the Bills of Exchange Act, the Interpretation Act and the Canada Labour Code (National Aboriginal Day).

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to introduce a bill that seeks to turn National Aboriginal Day into a statutory holiday. When this day was first declared a holiday, the National Indian Brotherhood—today's Assembly of First Nations—wanted a day to honour the indigenous peoples of this land. Designating this day as a national holiday is an important step and an opportunity to celebrate the cultures, languages, and contributions of the first nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples in Canada. This timely bill answers one of the TRC's calls to action, that Canada create a statutory holiday to honour residential school survivors, their families, and communities.

In the spirit of reconciliation, I introduce this bill to render June 21 a national statutory holiday, a day to reflect on treaty relationships, indigenous languages, and the legacy of residential schools. I look forward to getting my bill passed in the House.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   National Aboriginal Day
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LIB

Jane Philpott

Liberal

Hon. Jane Philpott (Minister of Health, Lib.)

moved for leave to introduce Bill S-5, An Act to amend the Tobacco Act and the Non-smokers’ Health Act and to make consequential amendments to other Acts.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Tobacco and Vaping Products Act
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CPC

Cheryl Gallant

Conservative

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition signed by campers who stay at Booth Landing Camping and Cottages in Chisholm, Ontario, on the peaceful and quiet Wasi Lake in the riding of Nipissing—Timiskaming. The petitioners call on the government to ensure that campgrounds with fewer than five full-time year-round employees be treated as small businesses and taxed as such.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Taxation
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LIB

Stephen Fuhr

Liberal

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition from my riding that calls on the House to specifically identify hospice palliative care as a defined medical service covered under the Canada Health Act.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Palliative Care
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June 15, 2017