December 14, 2016

LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, it is obvious that my colleague likes my answer so I will repeat that the rules governing fundraising are among the strictest in the country. We will continue to respond to the real challenges Canadians are facing. Our government listens to and engages with Canadians. We are going to continue to do the work that they want us to do.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

Rachael Harder

Conservative

Ms. Rachael Harder (Lethbridge, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, Canadian youth and students are some of the most vulnerable victims of the Liberals' no-jobs plan. The Liberals are raising taxes on them, thus making life even more expensive for young Canadians. They are losing hope altogether of having a long-term job in their near future. They cannot afford the $1,500 entry fee to get the Prime Minister's ear.

How can young Canadians trust the Prime Minister when he is willing to sell out their interests and their future to his billionaire friends?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Youth
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LIB

MaryAnn Mihychuk

Liberal

Hon. MaryAnn Mihychuk (Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this gives me an opportunity to talk about the many advancements we have been doing with young Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The fact is that we are providing more support for going to school, for getting real, practical training, and for finding the skills and abilities to adapt to a very changing workforce, as we all know, with the new economic revolution called 4.0.

I look forward to working with all members of the House in the new year.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Youth
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CPC

Jacques Gourde

Conservative

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister's confession about lobbying during $1,500 fundraisers blackens the honour of all Canadians. Our democratic system is now an international laughingstock. This brings shame to us all.

Will the Prime Minister apologize to Canadians and obey his own ethics rules?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, as the Prime Minister said, and as every one of our members has always said, we are always listening to and engaging with Canadians from coast to coast about the issues that matter to them.

When the time comes to make decisions, we are guided by one very important principle: the best interests of middle-class Canadians. That is the approach we took when we cut middle-class income taxes, and that is the approach we took when we introduced the tax-free Canada child benefit.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
CPC

Blaine Calkins

Conservative

Mr. Blaine Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, when the Prime Minister is hosting an exclusive cash for access event, he claims that he is advocating for the middle class. Really? I honestly hope that was an attempt at humour. The Prime Minister has no regard for his own rules, his own party rules, and he laughs in the face of the ethics laws.

When will the Prime Minister end these unethical cash for access events?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, let us look at the work this government has done.

This government has reduced taxes for middle-class Canadians. We have raised taxes for the wealthiest 1% of Canadians. This government has given more money to families with children who need it the most by introducing the Canada child benefit tax-free. That is also the approach we took when we expanded the Canada pension plan.

We will continue to respond to the very real challenges Canadians are facing.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
CPC

Blaine Calkins

Conservative

Mr. Blaine Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, enough is enough. The Prime Minister's cash for access events are a national embarrassment, and he is quickly becoming a mockery around the world. The Prime Minister is selling access to his government. He knows it, the Chinese government and its detractors know it, his caucus knows it, and Canadians know it. It is called corruption.

The Prime Minister has become a laughingstock on the matter of ethics. It is time for the Prime Minister to act like a leader and put an end to these unethical cash for access events.

The only question is, when will he do it?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this government is engaging with Canadians. This government is listening to Canadians. This government is responding to the very real challenges Canadians are facing.

I am not surprised that the Conservatives find it embarrassing that a government would listen to Canadians. We know that is what Canadians want. We will continue to consult and engage with them, because we need to respond to the challenges they are facing. We will continue to do the good work that Canadians expect us to do.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
CPC

Marilyn Gladu

Conservative

Ms. Marilyn Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, this is getting embarrassing for the Liberals. The Prime Minister now says that he used cash for access fundraisers to champion the middle class.

Where I come from, the middle class does not hang out at waterfront mansions or get to jet-set with Chinese billionaires. Where I come from, the middle class shows up for work every day, struggles to pay taxes, and plays by the rules.

If the Prime Minister wants some advice about the middle class, he should try meeting with the middle class.

When will the Prime Minister end his corruption and put hard-working Canadians first?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this government has had unprecedented levels of consultation with Canadians so that we can respond to the very real challenges Canadians are facing.

The member knows very well that when it comes to political financing, the rules are some of the most strict across this country. Even the Chief Electoral Officer has said so, and the member knows very well that the rules clearly state that only Canadians can donate to Canadian political parties.

We will continue to respond to the challenges Canadians are facing. We will continue to do the good work they expect us to do.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
Permalink
NDP

Matthew Dubé

New Democratic Party

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, CSIS has backtracked on its promise to reveal to a Senate committee whether journalists were under surveillance. The government will only say that no journalists are currently under surveillance.

Why, then, is CSIS so reluctant to share any information about this? This implies that surveillance of journalists is still ongoing, while the government is doing nothing meaningful to protect freedom of the press.

Will the minister finally take this matter seriously and launch a public inquiry?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, on the very important issue of press freedom and the protection of journalistic sources, all existing safeguards that are in place now are being reviewed to make sure that they are strong and effective.

I have said publicly many times that we are open to any and all advice coming from journalists, the legal community, or others who may have submissions to make about how the law can be made more effective.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
Permalink
NDP

Hélène Laverdière

New Democratic Party

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the United States has announced that it is cancelling certain arms deals with Saudi Arabia because of systemic and endemic problems related to the reported targeting of Yemeni civilians by that country.

Meanwhile, it seems that Canada is allowing the use of light armoured vehicles made in Canada in the conflict in Yemen.

Can the minister confirm this? Is he not concerned that Canada could become complicit in war crimes?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the government does not export the same kind of weapons to Saudi Arabia as the United States did. The weapons in that case were air to ground bombs. We condemn the repeated, senseless attacks in Yemen, including the recent horrific attack on a funeral home. These violations of international law and humanitarian law are tragic and unacceptable.

Obviously, we have denounced those actions repeatedly, and we are not part of the the Saudi coalition. We want Saudi Arabia to honour its international obligations.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as families look to buy Christmas gifts, they are haunted by worry, worry about the record household debt that has now reached $1.67 for every dollar of household earnings, worry compounded by the new taxes the government promises on wages, on gasoline, on home heating and electricity, and maybe even on health and dental plans.

As we get closer to Christmas, when will the government realize that many families have nothing more to give?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Taxation
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LIB

Bill Morneau

Liberal

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, there have been some really important things that have happened this year. On January 1, taxes were lowered for middle-class Canadians. On March 22, we introduced a budget that increased the guaranteed income supplement for single seniors by 10%, $943. We also introduced the Canada child benefit, which is helping families with, on average, $2,300.

We also changed student grants so they get 50% more for lower-income and middle-income families.

It has been a year of important initiatives, and we are looking forward to doing more for middle-class Canadians in 2017.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Taxation
Permalink
CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, by middle class, he apparently means the people who can afford to attend $1,500-a-plate fundraisers. That is why he cut taxes for people earning $200,000 a year. They got $800, but someone earning $45,000 got exactly zero.

The new $100 billion in debts that Liberals are adding is great news for the billionaire bond holders who will collect interest on it, but for the working class people who have to pay that interest through their taxes, it is a nightmare.

When will the finance minister realize that Canadians have their own debts and cannot afford to pay for his?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Taxation
Permalink
LIB

Jean-Yves Duclos

Liberal

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am grateful for this opportunity to repeat that middle class families are our top priority. We have avoided sending cheques to families of millionaires, so we can send them to nine families out of ten, which means the families of six million children, with an average benefit of $600 per month, non-taxable. That is taking the families of 300,000 children out of poverty.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Taxation
Permalink
CPC

Gérard Deltell

Conservative

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal's greed keeps eating into the wallets of Canadian workers and it knows no bounds.

What is the Liberals' latest scheme? They want to tax health insurance and dental insurance, which is very bad news. What will that accomplish? This has existed in Quebec for a few years now. Does the minister know what happened? Unfortunately, 20% of Quebec's workers no longer have private dental and health insurance.

Does the minister want 2.6 million Canadians to lose their insurance?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Taxation
Permalink

December 14, 2016