December 12, 2016

CPC

Michael Cooper

Conservative

Mr. Michael Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, Wynn's law closes a loophole in the Criminal Code by requiring prosecutors to disclose the criminal history of bail applicants. For Constable David Wynn, this loophole proved fatal after his killer was let out on bail because his extensive criminal history was not disclosed. Given that the minister opposes closing this loophole, will the minister say when exactly it is okay for someone to be let out on bail and on to the streets without their criminal history being disclosed?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Justice
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LIB

Jody Wilson-Raybould

Liberal

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, certainly I recognize the pain caused to Constable Wynn's family and his colleagues within the RCM Police. I want to say that I am committed to modernizing and improving the efficiencies and effectiveness of the criminal justice system. Our government supports the bill's objectives of ensuring that all relevant information is considered at bail hearings. This is why we are working with the provinces and territories and relevant stakeholders to review the bail system with an eye to improving the efficiencies and the effectiveness.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Justice
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CPC

Michael Cooper

Conservative

Mr. Michael Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the minister has said that Wynn's law is unnecessary because measures in the bill are already in place. For Constable David Wynn, clearly those measures were not good enough.

Why will the minister not do the right thing and close this loophole in the Criminal Code? Why will the minister not support Wynn's law so that what happened to Constable Wynn never happens again?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Justice
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LIB

Jody Wilson-Raybould

Liberal

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, again, I recognize the pain that was caused to Constable Wynn's family and to his colleagues within the RCMP.

In terms of this bill, I want to reference a report that was released following the Alberta's comprehensive bail review that was initiated after the death of Constable Wynn. It does not call for legislative changes at this time.

I will, however, continue to work with the provinces and territories to ensure that we improve the efficiencies and the effectiveness in the bill and the criminal justice system.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Justice
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NDP

Brigitte Sansoucy

New Democratic Party

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy (Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, a study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives informs us of the rising cost of child care for families. That is unacceptable. Even though Quebec has the lowest child care fees and is held up as an example to follow, the province has still seen a 14% increase in the cost of child care since last year.

What is the government's plan to help families who are dealing with these rising child care costs?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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LIB

Jean-Yves Duclos

Liberal

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am grateful to my colleague for giving me this opportunity to remind the House how important it is to support families and children, including those of the middle class. That is what we did in budget 2016, because we know how important it is for the Government of Canada to recommit to supporting our families' learning and child care needs.

We announced a $500-million investment. I look forward to continuing to work with the provinces and territories to quickly implement this plan to help our families and children.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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NDP

Sheila Malcolmson

New Democratic Party

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, child care costs continue to grow at an alarming rate. A new report shows that average infant child care fees in Vancouver are more than $1,200 a month. In St. John's, they come in at $1,400. In Toronto, they surpass $1,700. This rivals the cost of housing.

The Liberals have failed to produce the child care spaces they promised, they have failed to tackle growing child care costs. and their child benefit will lose its value by 2021.

Why is the government breaking its promises and failing children?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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LIB

Jean-Yves Duclos

Liberal

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am thankful for the opportunity to take advantage of this important question to signal that indeed we put into place in March a historic Canada child benefit that would lift the families of 500,000 Canadians out of poverty. We have also signalled that over the next few months we will put into place a $500 million package to support the early learning and child care needs of our children and families.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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CPC

Scott Reid

Conservative

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Kingston, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I have another question on the opaque proprietary protocols used by Vox Pop Labs.

In an interview, the company's CEO said, “when we’ve identified [responses] that are assumed to be from the same user, we take the first set of responses.” In the case of MyDemocracy.ca, would the minister inform the House whether second and third responses from the same IP address will be rejected? Will information be made public as to the total number of multiple responses from single IP addresses, whether they were accepted or rejected, and on what basis?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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LIB

Maryam Monsef

Liberal

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for the opportunity to invite all Canadians to go online to MyDemocracy.ca or to call 1-844-690-8363 to be part of this important conversation about their democratic values. I can assure them that the information will be protected by federal privacy laws. I can assure them that we want to hear from as many Canadians as possible before introducing legislation in the House. I can also assure all members of the House that we continue to be committed to hearing from Canadians before introducing legislation.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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CPC

Gérard Deltell

Conservative

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I do not know about you, but does the government realize that its approach to electoral reform is completely ridiculous? Does it not realize that? Because Canadians certainly do.

The minister set aside the parliamentary report that called for a referendum, the only right thing to do. Now the Liberals have come up with a postcard approach to democracy and launched a survey that is all over the map. People can provide just about any answer they want. It is ridiculous.

Why is the government refusing to do what Canadians want and hold a referendum?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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LIB

Maryam Monsef

Liberal

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I urge all members of the House to read the committee's report, and remind everyone that the government will be responding to the committee's report in due course.

The committee agreed, as do we, that we needed to hear from many more voices about the values that Canadians would like to see at the heart of their electoral reform. That is what we are doing. We encourage all Canadians to take part in MyDemocracy.ca. We thank the tens of thousands who have seen the merit in our approach and are engaging. We look forward to hearing from many more voices before introducing legislation in the House.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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CPC

Larry Miller

Conservative

Mr. Larry Miller (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, on Thursday, I was informed by some rural mail deliverers that they were instructed to deliver the infamous democratic reform postcards only to houses and apartment buildings, not to farms. This weekend, Susan from Stokes Bay asked me why she had not received her postcard, and wondered if the Liberals were deliberately not asking rural Canadians their opinion.

Where is the democracy in excluding rural Canadians? Does the minister actually think rural Canadians do not have an opinion on electoral reform, or is it because the Liberals are scared of what farm families might tell them?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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LIB

Maryam Monsef

Liberal

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, as an MP from a rural riding, I can assure the hon. member that the voice of rural Canada is incredibly important to me. One of the reasons we decided to send out a postcard via mail was that we recognized that access to the Internet was not equal among all Canadians living in rural areas. Individuals in my rural riding and others have received the postcard.

I thank the hon. member for bringing this to my attention. We will work to resolve it.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Democratic Reform
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LIB

Nicola Di Iorio

Liberal

Mr. Nicola Di Iorio (Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, Canadian travellers and businesses are anxious to know if they can count on a better preclearance system to expedite travel between Canada and the U.S.

In March, the Prime Minister signed an agreement in principle to expand preclearance to new sites, including Montreal's Central Station, as well as Jean Lesage International Airport in Quebec City, Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport, and Rocky Mountaineer in Vancouver.

Could the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness please update the House about the status of the binational legislation necessary to implement the agreement?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, border preclearance between Canada and the United States has existed for 60 years. It makes our border more secure and more efficient both ways. Last spring, the Prime Minister and the President of the United States agreed upon a major preclearance business expansion into the locations mentioned by the hard-working member for Saint-Léonard—Saint-Michel.

In Canada, we introduced the necessary legislation last June. I am pleased to note that both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate enacted their preclearance law this past week. The ball is now in our court to pass Bill C-23. Let us do it this afternoon by unanimous consent.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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CPC

Michelle Rempel

Conservative

Hon. Michelle Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, last week, the minister admitted that only half of the Syrian refugees who had come to Canada had found jobs. This means that this month thousands of refugees will require ongoing social assistance payments.

The Liberals have committed to bringing in tens of thousands of new Syrian refugees in 2017. On that note, I am wondering if the minister could provide the House and Canadians with some clarity as to how much this refugee commitment will actually cost the provinces as well as Canadian taxpayers.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
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LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the provinces have been on side from day one. As has been the case with past waves of refugees, it is in the early days an act of kindness by Canadians but over the long run it is a hugely positively investment. These refugees integrate into the labour force. Their children do exceptionally well. I have no doubt the Syrian refugees will do just as well or better than the Vietnamese boat people and many others who came before.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
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NDP

Anne Minh-Thu Quach

New Democratic Party

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals boast about working on behalf of the middle class and being progressive.

However, requests for food aid in Valleyfield have skyrocketed and organizations cannot afford to provide Christmas hampers this years. The use of food banks has increased 300%.

In an effort to reduce the number of requests for food aid, Food Banks Canada and Les Banques alimentaires du Québec are recommending a poverty reduction strategy.

How can the Liberals justify voting against the national strategy to combat poverty brought forward by my colleague from Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Poverty
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LIB

Jean-Yves Duclos

Liberal

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for allowing me to acknowledge the NDP's support for the work we have been doing in recent months with the provinces, territories, indigenous peoples, and municipalities in order to develop, for the first time in history, a national poverty reduction strategy and to ensure that this strategy supports the efforts of other governments and continues to lift hundreds of thousands of families out of poverty.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Poverty
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December 12, 2016