December 12, 2016

NDP

Guy Caron

New Democratic Party

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, before the Minister of Finance decided to give the banks a sweet Christmas present, everything was fine. The Supreme Court ruled that Quebec's Consumer Protection Act applied to bank customers.

The Liberals' Bill C-29 created a problem where there was not one before. By creating a conflict with Quebec law, the minister is trying to usurp power that he does not have. He cannot fix things and placate people by handing over a blank cheque and buying time. A law either passes or it does not.

Why is the minister playing constitutional politics at the expense of Quebec consumers?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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LIB

François-Philippe Champagne

Liberal

Mr. François-Philippe Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by applauding my colleague's work on the Standing Committee on Finance.

He is well aware that the measures in Bill C-29 are a step forward and will help consumers across the country. He is well aware of that. In its Marcotte decision, the Supreme Court asked us to clarify that, and we took this opportunity to update the rules and create more rules to protect Canadian consumers.

My colleague is well aware that his constituents, like mine, will be protected under this new regime, and we will continue to work with the Senate on this issue.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Finance
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CPC

John Brassard

Conservative

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, a vast majority of Canadians oppose the Liberals charging $1,500 to meet privately with the Prime Minister and senior cabinet minister, but things are getting worse. Reports today detail that major corporations lobbying the Liberals for favours are at the same time making massive donations to the Trudeau Foundation. In fact, since the Prime Minister came to power, money has rained down on the foundation.

Canadians detest corruption. When these big companies are lobbying the Prime Minister, is he giving them the wink, wink, nudge, nudge, to donate to the Trudeau Foundation?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the opportunity to stand in this House once again to remind all members and Canadians that when it comes to political financing, we have some of the strictest rules across the country. It is also important to note that only individuals can donate. The federal rules clearly state that parties cannot take money from trade associations, unions, or corporations.

This government and this party will continue to follow the rules.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

Blaine Calkins

Conservative

Mr. Blaine Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister promised that he would be open and transparent. It seems like he is only open if people pay the $1,500 cash for access entry fee, but if they cannot do that, they could always kick in a bunch of cash to the Trudeau Foundation. The Liberals claims that the Prime Minister's open and accountable rules would be enforced by the Privy Council Office, so I asked the Privy Council Office who exactly in the office enforces these rules. It turns out that it is no one. Its response was, “PCO is not an investigative body.”

When will the Prime Minister finally admit that he has deceived Canadians and that no one is enforcing his own rules?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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LIB

Bardish Chagger

Liberal

Hon. Bardish Chagger (Leader of the Government in the House of Commons and Minister of Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, as I have said time and time again, and will have to continue to say, as the member does not seem to want to hear my answer, when it comes to political financing, we have some of the most strict rules across the country, and this government, this party, will always follow the rules.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

James Bezan

Conservative

Mr. James Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as you can see, there is nobody policing the Liberals when they are breaking the rules.

In opposition, the Prime Minister stated that every military deployment must have transparent objectives and a responsible plan to achieve them, but now the Prime Minister is being ambiguous. Over 120 peacekeepers have died in Mali alone, and Canadians want to know the facts.

Where will our troops be stationed, what are their objectives, what are the rules of engagement, will the UN be in command, and what is the exit strategy? Will the Liberals finally be transparent and provide us with the facts, or is this just another charade to get a seat on the UN Security Council?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, what is a fact is that Canadians want Canada to be a determined peacekeeper in the world. We need to do our share for peace in the world, so we are considering, with our allies, which deployment will make more sense and will provide Canada with the ability to achieve peace around the world. I am sure all of my colleagues will support this goal.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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CPC

Pierre Paul-Hus

Conservative

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals are going to deploy our troops to the mess in Mali. We know nothing about the mission. We know nothing about the objective, the duration, the rules of engagement, or the resources that will be deployed. However, we do know that our troops are the currency for obtaining a seat on the UN Security Council.

We hope that the Liberals will be just as transparent as the Netherlands, as the Senate is asking for, by providing all the details of the mission to Parliament in order to have an informed debate and to hold a vote before deploying our troops. Will the Liberal government hold a debate and a vote in Parliament?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I want to assure my colleague that the premise of his question is completely false. Canada is engaging in peacekeeping around the world because it wants to promote peace, nothing more. No need to laugh at that. It is Canada's fundamental responsibility. I am sure that the opposition is going to stop taking this lightly. It is quite serious.

It is about promoting peace and we are going to do that with courage and determination because that is what we have always done in the past and that is what we will continue to do in the future, certainly under the leadership of this Prime Minister.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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NDP

Murray Rankin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Murray Rankin (Victoria, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, CSIS has been storing sensitive data on totally innocent Canadians, a policy that the government defended, but the courts have now said is illegal. This metadata can reveal our medical conditions, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and much more. While many are calling for new safeguards, the minister has left the door open to double down and make it easier for CSIS to mine data from ordinary Canadians.

With Bill C-51 still the law, does the government now want to add the power to store the sensitive data of innocent Canadians, yes or no?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, on national security, we will provide new scrutiny by a committee of parliamentarians, will provide a new office for community outreach and counter-radicalization, faithful compliance with the Charter of Rights, clarity about warrants, more precise definitions on propaganda, repairs to the no-fly list, full protection for the right of protest, a statutory review after three years, and, for the first time, Canadians are being thoroughly consulted about what other steps are necessary to keep Canadians safe and to safeguard their rights and freedoms, including their right to privacy.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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NDP

Matthew Dubé

New Democratic Party

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, when the Federal Court deems something illegal, it seems pretty easy to answer if one is going to continue doing that or not, yes or no.

We know that torture is immoral, but the words of president-elect Trump are quite worrisome. He is suggesting a return to using horrifying methods such as water boarding. At a time when our security agencies are sharing more and more information with our neighbours to the south, the ministerial directive that allows the use of information obtained by torture is still in place.

Will the minister repeal this directive, yes or no?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, all ministerial directives under the previous government are under review. With respect to the issue of torture, as all members of the House know, it is contrary to the Criminal Code, it is contrary to the Canadians Charter of Rights and Freedoms, it is contrary to virtually every treaty this country has ever signed. We will be faithful to the values of Canadians.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Public Safety
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LIB

Brenda Shanahan

Liberal

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan (Châteauguay—Lacolle, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, as promised in January, the government appointed four temporary members to the National Energy Board in order to meet a commitment to consult communities and indigenous groups to get as much feedback as possible on the proposed energy east project. Three additional vacancies came up this fall, when three members of the energy east review panel stepped down.

As part of our government's commitment to a new merit-based, transparent process, can the minister update the House on when these three bilingual candidates will be appointed to the National Energy Board?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Natural Resources
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LIB

Jim Carr

Liberal

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Châteauguay—Lacolle for her question.

I am pleased to announce that, earlier today, we appointed three new bilingual temporary members to the National Energy Board. These new appointments could be assigned to the energy east review panel.

Those three individuals possess the skills and experience needed to pursue this important mandate.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Natural Resources
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CPC

Colin Carrie

Conservative

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the health minister is planning to make heroin injection sites more accessible. When we were in government, we passed legislation to ensure that the potential sites have community support. Reports indicate that the minister intends to gut this legislation and force these unsafe injection sites into resistant communities.

Could the minister confirm that she will finally listen to communities and reverse her unilateral and dangerous plan?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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LIB

Jane Philpott

Liberal

Hon. Jane Philpott (Minister of Health, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I expect that the member opposite is well aware of the fact that we are facing in this country a very serious and growing public health crisis. In this crisis, hundreds of Canadians have lost their lives. It is absolutely essential that we together find ways to be able to support Canadians. Our approach to drug policy will always be comprehensive, collaborative, compassionate, and evidence based. I look forward to making sure that we have policies in place to support Canadians.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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CPC

Alain Rayes

Conservative

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the media is reporting that the Minister of Health is about to introduce legislation to make it easier to open injection sites in Canada. This is a very sensitive issue, and the Conservative Party has always believed that respect for communities must come first.

The existing legislation governing injection sites created under the previous government requires extensive consultations, the collection of crime data, and a criminal record check of all employees that goes back more than 10 years.

My question is simple: can the minister tell us if those requirements will be maintained?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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LIB

Jane Philpott

Liberal

Hon. Jane Philpott (Minister of Health, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the member has said that this is a delicate matter, and indeed it is. I hope that the member is also aware that there is an abundance of evidence that supervised consumption sites, when properly established and well maintained, will save lives, prevent infections, give Canadians access to health care systems, and when they have the approval of the communities that want them and need them, they are important to the health of Canadians.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Health
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December 12, 2016