May 29, 2015

NDP

Jamie Nicholls

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jamie Nicholls (Vaudreuil—Soulanges, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, next week, from Friday, June 5 to Sunday, June 7, Vaudreuil-Dorion will celebrate the 23rd edition of Les Seigneuriales, a history-themed festival that celebrates New France. There will be activities for the whole family, including traditional music performances, workshops, period games for children and interactive re-enactments.

This year also marks the 350th anniversary of the arrival of the Carignan-Salières regiment. For me, this event is not just a historical fact; it is also the anniversary of my family's arrival in New France. My ancestor, Jean Desforges, known as Saint-Maurice, was part of that regiment. I am proud of my family heritage.

Vaudreuil-Soulanges was a meeting place for our three founding peoples, a place where people could trade, learn about each other's cultures and dream of a country that would become Canada.

I invite all of my constituents to come to this event to celebrate our heritage in the best region of the country, Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Twenty-third Annual Celebration of New France
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CPC

Costas Menegakis

Conservative

Mr. Costas Menegakis (Richmond Hill, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, my constituents in Richmond Hill know that only this Conservative government will help families save more of their own money for their priorities. This week, the Liberal leader said that he favours a mandatory expansion of the CPP of the type that Kathleen Wynne put forward in Ontario. That is a $1,000 pay cut for every Ontario worker and indeed every Canadian earning $60,000 a year. That is just from their own pockets, in addition to what would be paid by their employer.

Families in York Region did not ask for that. Indeed, Canadians did not ask for that. They do not want it and they will never accept it. Under this Conservative government, Canadians can count on more money in their pockets at the end of the day.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Taxation
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LIB

Adam Vaughan

Liberal

Mr. Adam Vaughan (Trinity—Spadina, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, nowhere has the current government's failure in housing become more obvious than in the province of Manitoba. While this is bad enough, it is even worse because the junior minister responsible for housing comes from Manitoba. One would think she would pay attention to the problems in her own province. She does not.

In Manitoba, housing for first nations is critical, yet a $300 million fund to produce housing has created just 99 houses. If all the government can show is $3 million per home, it is not indifference that is the problem; it is incompetence

As the minister and her government fail to build housing in communities across Canada, particularly in rural Canada, pressures build in big cities. In Winnipeg, shabby hotels are now being used to house homeless young people. These places are as dangerous as they are dismal. The minister's response: nothing.

The only real thing the Conservative government is doing on housing is pulling subsidies, and on this file the government is hurting seniors in Manitoba. As mortgages expire, so too do low-income subsidies for Manitobans on fixed incomes.

No wonder the junior minister and her senior minister missed a major housing conference in Winnipeg in her own province. They are missing in action and—

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Housing in Manitoba
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NDP

Joe Comartin

New Democratic Party

The Deputy Speaker

Order, please. The hon. member for Saskatoon—Wanuskewin.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Housing in Manitoba
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CPC

Maurice Vellacott

Conservative

Mr. Maurice Vellacott (Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, Canadians do not want the most recent tax increase proposed by the leader of the Liberal Party. It would be $1,000 of extra payroll tax out of their own pockets for every employee who earns just $60,000 a year. My Saskatonian constituents and all Canadians want more money in their pockets, not less money. The small businesses that employ those workers would also have to pay the equivalent amount of extra payroll tax, which would kill jobs.

We will vigorously oppose the Liberal leader's proposed tax increase, an increase that would punish workers. We will strenuously oppose it on behalf of all Canadians.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Taxation
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NDP

Paul Dewar

New Democratic Party

Mr. Paul Dewar (Ottawa Centre, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, here is a story that is played out many times around the world.

The cabinet takes over prime real estate to build its leader's legacy project in the capital. It chooses a massive, imposing design. The plan creates local discontent. It gets a failing grade on cost and especially on location. Architects, the mayor and council, and even the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court join the chorus of voices opposed to the plan. The public is opposed to it. Even the government's own partisans start asking for change, but still ministers gleefully promise to ride roughshod over everyone because nothing trumps their leader's vanity.

I am not describing a Communist dictatorship in its final days. This is the story of Canada's own “CommieCons”. The irony of it was funny for awhile, but enough is enough. The government's disregard for democratic voices is a slap in the face to the freedom fighters who are supposed to be honoured by this memorial. Let us tear down this monumental failure.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Canadian Heritage
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CPC

Rick Dykstra

Conservative

Mr. Rick Dykstra (St. Catharines, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, our Conservative government disagrees with the statement of the Liberal leader, who said he supports “a mandatory expansion of the CPP of the type that Kathleen Wynne put forward in Ontario.” That plan would raise taxes by thousands of dollars on every worker and family earning $60,000 a year. We reject that. Our approach is a low-tax plan for a secure retirement.

We have heard the Liberal leader tell us right here in the House of Commons that he and his family are not part of the middle class. My parents and their families are part of the middle class, along with millions of families across this country. The Liberal leader is intent on taking money from the middle class and paying for his programs.

This party and this government have lowered taxes to ensure that millions of families across this country enjoy the money that they have earned and deserve and spend it the way they believe it should be spent.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Taxation
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NDP

David Christopherson

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, Canadians have been shocked by the lack of action in Canada on defective Takata airbags. Already we have seen six people killed and over 100 injured.

The Americans issued a recall last week. Over one million Canadian vehicles have the same airbags, yet the Conservative government only issued a recall notice yesterday, and Transport Canada still does not even have mandatory recall powers.

When it comes to the safety of Canadian drivers, why is Canada lagging behind the rest of the world?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Transportation Safety
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CPC

Jeff Watson

Conservative

Mr. Jeff Watson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the safety and security of Canadians is a top priority. In 2014, we passed measures to strengthen Canada's recall system, measures which the member opposite and his party opposed. In budget 2015, we have committed to strengthening even further our recall system to give us the power toward recalls and levy monetary penalties. I expect the member will support that.

To this point, Transport Canada has received no complaints related to this issue from Canadians and is not aware of any incidents having taken place in Canada.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Transportation Safety
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NDP

David Christopherson

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, what exactly is the government waiting for, bodies to pile up before it takes action?

Canadians are waking up today to more bad economic news. Just two months after the Conservative budget projected a first quarter GDP growth of 1.2%, our economy actually shrank. Conservative mismanagement has meant more people out of work, more families struggling with household debt, and now an economy that is shrinking instead of growing.

Will Conservatives finally admit their approach is not working and present a real plan to create jobs and kick start our economy?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, since coming to office, our government has had one of the best job-creation records in the G7, and we are leading in economic growth.

While we are focused on creating jobs, the Liberals are pushing a high-tax, high-debt agenda that will threaten jobs and set working families back. Their leader even said, “We’re looking at an expansion and a mandatory expansion of the CPP of the type that Kathleen Wynne put forward in Ontario”. For people earning $60,000, that means an extra $1,000 of tax that they will have to pay each year.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
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NDP

David Christopherson

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, a little less bragging and little more action is what Canadians are looking for.

It is no wonder Conservatives are failing on the economy. The Minister of Finance thinks the answer to our shrinking economy is to weaken labour protections and make it easier to fire workers.

The Prime Minister claimed that he was just talking about Greece, but the minister's office said, no, that he was talking about France. However, mixed-up Conservative excuses are not fooling anyone.

When will Conservatives stop using attacks on workers and their rights as a smokescreen for their economic mismanagement?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance said no such thing. He was talking about the situation in European countries like Greece and France where their liberal policies have resulted in out-of-control deficits and out-of-control spending. As a result, there have been tax hikes, massive layoffs and cuts in services, the same thing the Liberal government did in the 1990s because of its own financial mismanagement.

In contrast, our government has balanced the budget, while giving benefits directly to families and reducing taxes on the middle class. However, the Liberals and the NDP want to take those benefits away and raise taxes on the middle class.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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NDP

Sadia Groguhé

New Democratic Party

Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives have a nasty habit of attacking the middle class in international forums. In Davos in 2012, the Prime Minister announced that Canadians will have to work an additional two years before they can retire. At a G7 meeting on Wednesday, the Minister of Finance announced that employers need to be able to lay off employees more easily to create jobs. Unbelievable.

Do the Conservatives not understand that in order to have a strong economy we need to create jobs for the middle class?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance said no such thing. As I said, he was talking about the situation in European countries like Greece and France.

Let me tell members what we are doing in Canada. While we are letting middle-class Canadians choose how they want to spend and save their money, the Liberals and the NDP want to raise payroll taxes. The Liberal leader announced that he would dramatically hike payroll taxes on middle-class Canadians. He even said, “We’re looking at an expansion and a mandatory expansion of the CPP of the type that Kathleen Wynne put forward in Ontario”. For people earning $60,000, that means an extra $1,000 in taxes that they will have to pay each year.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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NDP

Sadia Groguhé

New Democratic Party

Mrs. Sadia Groguhé (Saint-Lambert, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives have no one to blame but themselves for the slow demise of the middle class.

Statistics Canada has confirmed that the Conservatives' unbalanced policies are undermining job creation and hurting our economy. Our GDP dropped 0.6% in the first three months of 2015. Canadians are working harder and harder, but they are struggling to make ends meet under the Conservatives.

Will the government get its priorities in order and create jobs for the middle class instead of trying to eliminate jobs?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, this is a further indication of global economic uncertainty and how it is affecting Canada, which is why we must continue with our low-tax plan for jobs and growth, a plan that is working. Since the depths of the recession, over 1.2 million net new jobs have been created. These are overwhelmingly full-time private sector jobs in high-wage industries.

However, the Liberal leader's proposed dramatic payroll tax would kill jobs in Canada. In fact, the CFIB survey of employers in Ontario said that 69% would have to freeze or cut salaries, and 53% would have to lay off workers if this were to happen.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Markham—Unionville, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister should know that the Reuters' reporter himself confirmed that the finance minister's comments were not related to Greece.

We learned this morning that the Canadian economy shrank during the first quarter of this year. The Minister of Finance is in Europe, and he is saying that we need to cut jobs in order to grow the economy.

My question is simple. How many jobs does the minister think we need to cut in order to grow our economy?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as I said, the finance minister said no such thing. The GDP number is a further indication of global economic uncertainty, which is why we must continue with our low-tax plan for jobs and growth, a plan that is working. The Bank of Canada, the OECD and the IMF are all projecting another year of economic growth in Canada.

However, the Liberal leader is proposing a dramatic payroll tax hike that would kill jobs in Canada. As I mentioned, the CFIB survey of employers in Ontario said that 69% would have to freeze or cut salaries, and 53% would have to terminate jobs to cope with the added costs of an increase in the CPP.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Wascana, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, while the finance minister lectures G7 countries on how to get economic growth by firing people, GDP figures here at home destroy his credibility.

Under the current government, Canada's economy shrank in March. It also shrank in February, January, last November and last August. Joblessness is up by 200,000 more than before the recession. Business investment is down. Exports are down. We have suffered 51 months of trade deficits. The government's plan is producing no growth and no jobs. Why does it not change it?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Employment
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May 29, 2015