May 8, 2015

NDP

Denis Blanchette

New Democratic Party

Mr. Denis Blanchette (Louis-Hébert, NDP)

moved for leave to introduce Bill C-676, An Act to amend the Railway Safety Act (maintenance of railway works).

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the people of the Quebec City area, I am proud to introduce this bill, which contains two measures: a measure to recognize that a railway work that is designated as a historic place must be preserved in a way that enhances its beauty and historic character; and, more importantly, a measure that allows the government, in the case of default, to order the work to be done at the expense of the owner.

For 10 years, the Conservative government has been unable to have the Quebec Bridge painted. It has given the people of Quebec City a false impression by claiming that it has put $100 million on the table, but on condition that CN does its part, which CN is refusing to do because it has no obligation in that regard.

My bill would force CN to paint the Quebec Bridge, and the mayors of Quebec City and Lévis think it is a good idea.

Therefore, I invite all members of the House, especially government members, to work together and agree to quickly pass this simple, pragmatic and effective bill.

(Motions deemed adopted, bill read the first time and printed.)

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Railway Safety Act
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Wascana, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have a petition to file today, signed by many people from across the province of Saskatchewan, about the rights of farmers, particularly farmers of small farms.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to enshrine in legislation the inalienable rights of farmers and other Canadians to save, reuse, select, exchange and sell their own seeds.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Agriculture
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NDP

Laurin Liu

New Democratic Party

Ms. Laurin Liu (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I believe that on this NDP opposition day, this petition is especially relevant because we know that Canadians pay more than $336 million a year in GST on feminine hygiene products.

The people who signed this petition are calling on the government to pass the NDP's Bill C-282 in order to eliminate the GST on all feminine hygiene products.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Taxation
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CPC

Maurice Vellacott

Conservative

Mr. Maurice Vellacott (Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions.

The first petition is from quite a number of people from across my province.

The petitioners draw attention to the fact that a CBC documentary revealed that ultrasounds were being used in Canada to tell the sex of an unborn child so expectant parents could choose to terminate that pregnancy if the unborn child was a girl. They remind us that 92% of Canadians believe sex-selective pregnancy termination should be illegal and that gendercide has created a global gender imbalance, resulting in violence and the human trafficking of girls. The three deadliest words in the world are “It's a girl”.

The petitioners therefore want members of Parliament to condemn discrimination against girls occurring through sex-selective pregnancy termination.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Sex Selection
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CPC

Maurice Vellacott

Conservative

Mr. Maurice Vellacott (Saskatoon—Wanuskewin, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the second petition draws attention to the fact that a high percentage of prostitutes are forced or coerced into the sex trade and trafficked.

The petitioners ask the House of Commons to legislate that it be a criminal offence to purchase sex with a woman, man or child, and that it be a criminal offence for pimps, madams and others to profit from the proceeds of the pernicious sex trade.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Prostitution
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NDP

Niki Ashton

New Democratic Party

Ms. Niki Ashton (Churchill, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise in the House to present a petition that connects with our opposition day motion, a petition that was signed by thousands of Canadians, many Canadian women.

The petitioners call on the Government of Canada to cease taxation on menstrual hygiene products. These women and men across the country call for leadership from the federal government and a fundamental stand in support of equality, ensuring women are not penalized because of their need for products because we are women.

I submit this petition, sharing the hope of so many Canadians that the government will listen and take action now.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Taxation
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LIB

Kirsty Duncan

Liberal

Ms. Kirsty Duncan (Etobicoke North, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition regarding autism spectrum disorders, ASDs.

These disorders are characterized by social and communication challenges, and a pattern of repetitive behaviours and interests. They are lifelong, affect development and life experience, and exert emotional and financial pressures on families.

The petitioners call on the government to work with the provinces and territories and stakeholders to develop a pan-Canadian strategy for autism spectrum disorder.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Autism Spectrum Disorders
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CPC

James Rajotte

Conservative

Mr. James Rajotte (Edmonton—Leduc, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present two petitions. The first petition is on behalf of many constituents in my riding.

The petitioners call for the creation of a legislative ombudsman mechanism for responsible mining.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Mining Industry
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CPC

James Rajotte

Conservative

Mr. James Rajotte (Edmonton—Leduc, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the second petition calls upon Parliament and the Government of Canada to recognize the inherent rights of farmers derived from thousands of years of custom and tradition to save, reuse, select, exchange and sell their own seeds.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Agriculture
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NDP

Raymond Côté

New Democratic Party

Mr. Raymond Côté (Beauport—Limoilou, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I am presenting a petition signed by dozens of people who are calling on the government to remove the tax on feminine hygiene products.

I am pleased to present this petition because, when working in food banks, I realized that the more expensive this type of product is, the more inaccessible it is to people with limited means and the more difficult it is for them to make ends meet and fill their grocery carts.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Taxation
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LIB

Kevin Lamoureux

Liberal

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I rise to table a petition signed by residents of Winnipeg North with reference to the budget, indicating that the 2015 budget favours the wealthy over middle-class and low-income Canadians, and lacks a true plan for jobs and economic growth.

The petitioners call on the House of Commons to recognize the failure of the 2015 budget to meet the needs of Canadians.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   The Budget
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NDP

Réjean Genest

New Democratic Party

Mr. Réjean Genest (Shefford, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition about a cause that is very important to the NDP. The petitioners are calling on the government to stop making cuts to our postal services. When will we have a government that will stand up and give services to everyone?

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Canada Post
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CPC

Tom Lukiwski

Conservative

Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 1123 and 1129.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
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NDP

Craig Scott

New Democratic Party

Mr. Craig Scott

With respect to Natural Resource Canada’s latest plant hardiness zones map: (a) what factors does the government consider when determining the plant hardiness zone of a particular geographical area; (b) are some variables given more weight than others in determining the plant hardiness zone of a particular geographical area; (c) given the impact of climate change across Canada, how is it that Vancouver Island is the only place in Canada to have gained additional plant hardiness zones since the last release of climatic zone data ten years ago; (d) has the government explored using climate envelope models; and (e) given the growing numbers of trades people that contribute to the economy through plant growth and maintenance, what is the government’s plan to ensure that they are regularly getting the most accurate information on plant hardiness zones?

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 1123
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CPC

Kelly Block

Conservative

Mrs. Kelly Block (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, with regard to (a), hardiness zones are geographic areas associated with the probability of plant survival in relation to the average climatic conditions present.

NRCan scientists use two different approaches for delineating hardiness zones.

They use a made-in-Canada approach, first developed in the 1960s by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, revised and modernized by Natural Resources Canada in 2001 and again in 2010. The Canadian map delineates plant hardiness zones using seven relevant climate variables. See part b for the list of variables.

They use a hardiness zone map developed by the United States Department of Agriculture, USDA, that relies solely on extreme minimum temperature to delineate hardiness zones.

Both approaches are recognized and widely used by the horticultural community in Canada.

With regard to (b), the made-in-Canada system is based on statistical analyses of plant survival at test sites across the country and involves seven climate variables, each with a different weight or importance. Application of the formula yields an index that is used to determine a hardiness zone. The variables, in order of importance, are:

monthly mean of the daily minimum temperatures, in °C, of the coldest month, the minimum temperature factor;

mean frost-free period above 0°C in days, length of the growing season;

amount of rainfall from June to November, in mm;

monthly mean of the daily maximum temperatures, in °C, of the warmest month, maximum temperature factor;

a “winter factor” that reflects the stress caused to plants by loss of winter cold adaptation caused by above-freezing temperatures in winter, calculated using the monthly mean of the daily minimum temperatures of the coldest month and the total rainfall in January;

mean maximum depth of snow, in mm, a positive factor that reflects insulation of plants against cold;

and maximum wind gust, in km/h, over 30-year period, reflecting environmental stress.

With regard to (c), there are two new hardiness zones, 8b and 9a, that have emerged in Canada. Both are found on Vancouver Island, the warmest area of the country. These two new zones are the result of two factors: an increase in weather temperature; and an increased quantity of weather data, from 1930 to 1990, which incorporates a digital elevation model that captures the effect that topography has on plant hardiness. This important factor was not previously reflected in the Canadian hardiness zone map.

With regard to (d), yes the government explored using climate envelope models. Many are shown on the plant hardiness website at http://planthardiness.gc.ca. The aim of this work is to go beyond a single general map and develop range maps for individual species of trees, shrubs and perennial flowers.

With regard to (e), the work is made available at the plant hardiness website. A variety of knowledge transfer activities occur as opportunities arise, including presentations at conferences, journal articles, including in trade magazines, and posters.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 1123
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NDP

Charlie Angus

New Democratic Party

Mr. Charlie Angus

With respect to each senate appointment made by Prime Minister Harper: (a) did the government verify that each individual being appointed to the senate met their constitutional residency requirement; (b) how did the government verify that each individual met their constitutional residency requirement; and (c) what are the details verifying that each individual met their constitutional residency requirement?

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 1129
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CPC

Paul Calandra

Conservative

Mr. Paul Calandra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the government does not comment on matters before the court.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 1129
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CPC

Tom Lukiwski

Conservative

Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, if Questions Nos. 1122, 1124, 1126, 1127, 1128, 1130 and 1134 could be made orders for returns, these returns would be tabled immediately.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
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CPC

Bruce Stanton

Conservative

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Bruce Stanton)

Is that agreed?

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
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?

Some hon. members

Agreed.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions Passed as Orders for Returns
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May 8, 2015