April 24, 2015

CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, we are proud to introduce a balanced budget and a plan for job creation and economic growth while keeping taxes low. Thanks to our low-tax plan, the average Canadian family of four now has an extra $6,600 in their pockets every year.

Here is what the opposition is not telling people: The Liberals and the NDP want high taxes on middle-class families, high taxes on middle-class seniors, and high taxes on middle-class consumers. That is their plan: higher taxes for the middle class.

Our Conservative government is lowering taxes on the middle class and lowering taxes for all Canadians.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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NDP

David Christopherson

New Democratic Party

Mr. David Christopherson (Hamilton Centre, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, while their budget was a most blatant example of electioneering, let us remember what the Conservatives are really trying to hide from: questions about the Prime Minister's appointment of Mike Duffy to the Senate. Senate appointments are the sole responsibility of the Prime Minister, not someone else, as the parliamentary secretary keeps incorrectly claiming.

Could the parliamentary secretary explain how the Conservatives could be the only people in Ottawa that did not know Mike Duffy lived in Ottawa?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

Paul Calandra

Conservative

Mr. Paul Calandra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I have answered this question on a number of occasions.

The member is quite right, though, in the sense that it is only the Conservatives who understand how hard Canadian families work. That is why we are putting more money back in their pockets with the policies that have been brought forward by the Minister of Finance.

At the same time, the New Democrats could help. They could help by repaying the $2.7 million that they illegally used to fund illegal offices in Montreal, offices that they said they were creating in Ottawa with employees who actually lived in Ottawa. However, we know that was a lie because they actually lived in Montreal and worked in Montreal, against the rules of this House. They should pay back the $2.7 million they owe the taxpayers.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre

New Democratic Party

Ms. Rosane Doré Lefebvre (Alfred-Pellan, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Constitution states that for a senator to be appointed, “He shall be resident in the Province for which he is appointed.”

That is a requirement that the Prime Minister has a duty to verify, since he is the one who appoints senators. However, we know that did not happen, since Mike Duffy has lived in Kanata, Ontario, for years.

What, exactly, made the Prime Minister think that Senator Mike Duffy was indeed a resident of Prince Edward Island?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

Paul Calandra

Conservative

Mr. Paul Calandra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, as I have already said, the constitutional practice on this has been clear for almost 150 years.

It is also clear that it is against the rules of the House to use taxpayer money for partisan purposes. There are 68 NDP members who used taxpayer money in violation of the rules of the House, and I encourage all NDP members to do the right thing and repay taxpayers.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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NDP

Rosane Doré Lefebvre

New Democratic Party

Ms. Rosane Doré Lefebvre (Alfred-Pellan, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the more the Conservatives avoiding answering, the more Canadians have questions about this affair. It is rather simple. Either the Prime Minister was not aware of Duffy's place of residence—which shows that he really did not do his job—or else he was aware, in which case he should not have appointed Mike Duffy as a senator for that province.

How does the Prime Minister explain his appointment of Mike Duffy as a senator for a province in which he did not even reside?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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CPC

Paul Calandra

Conservative

Mr. Paul Calandra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and for Intergovernmental Affairs, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I have answered that question many times.

At the same time, as I just mentioned, there are 68 members of the NDP who owe Canadian taxpayers $2.7 million. The member who asked this question owes Canadian taxpayers over $29,000 in illegal money that was funnelled to an illegal office in Montreal, against all of the rules of the House. The NDP might think that is funny. I can assure them that Canadians taxpayers do not. Canadian taxpayers would rather have the $2.7 million in their pockets as a result of their hard work, and not in illegal offices in Montreal. I suggest that the NDP pay it back.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Ethics
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LIB

Kirsty Duncan

Liberal

Ms. Kirsty Duncan (Etobicoke North, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the finance minister made it clear to Canadians that Conservatives only care about short-term political gain when he said that the TFSA increase for the rich will be paid for Canada's next generation, and “why don't we leave that to [the Prime Minister's] granddaughter to solve”.

The cost will rise exponentially by tens of billions of dollars a year for both the federal government and the provinces. Why are the Conservatives mortgaging the future generation, instead of building a plan for jobs and growth?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, we are proud to leave more money in the pockets of Canadians, which is good for future generations. The TFSA is the most popular savings vehicle since the RSP was introduced, with 11 million accounts and growing, the majority of which are for low-income and middle-income earners.

The Liberals want high taxes on middle-class families, high taxes on middle-class seniors, and high taxes on middle-class consumers. That is their plan: high taxes on the middle class.

Our Conservative government is lowering taxes on the middle class, and we will not apologize for helping Canadians save for their future.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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LIB

Kirsty Duncan

Liberal

Ms. Kirsty Duncan (Etobicoke North, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, in addition to saddling our future generations with a multi-billion dollar mortgage, the Conservatives are funding this change by taking $32,000 from the poorest and most vulnerable seniors by raising the OAS age from 65 to 67.

Why are the Conservatives taking money away from low-income seniors and giving even more to high wealth households? Why will they not help the middle class and those working hard to join it?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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CPC

Andrew Saxton

Conservative

Mr. Andrew Saxton (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, it is our Conservative government that has fought for seniors. We have increased the guaranteed income supplement by the largest amount in more than a quarter of a century. They voted against it. We have introduced pension income splitting for seniors. They voted against it. Economic action plan 2015 introduces even more support for seniors, such as the new home accessibility tax credit, more compassionate care benefits, and lower required RRIF withdrawals.

They want to raise taxes on seniors. We are putting money back in the pockets of Canadian seniors.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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LIB

Marc Garneau

Liberal

Mr. Marc Garneau (Westmount—Ville-Marie, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, increasing the TFSA limit will mainly benefit the richest Canadians and will impose a heavy tax burden on future generations. That is not fair or prudent. Canada is facing many challenges: an ageing population, a stagnant economy, a shortage of quality jobs and crumbling infrastructure. We must not mortgage our future and create problems for the Prime Minister's granddaughter to solve.

Why is the government favouring the richest Canadians by mortgaging our children's future?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, nearly two-thirds of Canadians who contributed the maximum amount to a tax-free savings account earn less than $60,000. The Liberals think that everyone who earns $60,000 or less is rich and that they need to raise those people's taxes. That is the Liberals' position. We support taxpayers and seniors, and we are going to let them save more money without having to pay taxes on their earnings.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
Permalink
NDP

Peter Julian

New Democratic Party

Mr. Peter Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, let us talk about another Conservative mess. A government ad promoting the apprentice loan program shows workers committing a wide range of serious violations of workplace health and safety standards.

Now the Conservatives want to spend $7.5 million to promote their election budget at taxpayers' expense and with faulty advertising.

Will the Conservatives stop wasting taxpayers' money on partisan advertising that is full of misleading information and depictions of health and safety standards being violated?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Government Advertising
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, our government is funding apprentice grants. Why? Because we will need one million skilled workers over the next seven years. We are giving out grants and loans to apprentices to prepare them to fill those jobs. The New Democrats do not believe in the skilled trades and oppose these investments. We will create jobs by training our young people in those trades.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Government Advertising
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NDP

Peter Julian

New Democratic Party

Mr. Peter Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, we actually think health and safety is important for the workplace and Conservatives cannot even get that right. They are spending $7.5 million in advertising for a snake oil sales job on a budget that leaves Canadians behind and the Minister of Finance has admitted the truth that our grandchildren will be saddled with the fiscal problems of billion dollar handouts to the wealthiest few. Meanwhile, the number of out-of-work Canadians applying for EI benefits has surged, but fewer and fewer are being accepted.

Why do the Conservatives think that helping the wealthy buy a second BMW is more important than helping Canadians and parents put food on the table?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
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CPC

Pierre Poilievre

Conservative

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Minister of Employment and Social Development and Minister for Democratic Reform, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, New Democrats think anybody who makes $60,000 a year is too wealthy. Sixty per cent of those who have maximized their tax-free savings accounts earned less than $60,000 a year. Two-thirds of those who have maxed out are seniors. These are people who are taking money from their RRSP and putting it into their tax-free savings accounts so that they can have a tax-free nest egg to live on. These are middle- and lower-income seniors and the NDP wants to raise their taxes.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Budget
Permalink
NDP

Guy Caron

New Democratic Party

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, it is very clear that the Conservatives are placing a major burden on the shoulders of future generations.

The Conservative budget is a disappointment to Quebec, the regions and families. The Conservatives are unilaterally reducing the growth of health transfers to Quebec, and infrastructure funding will be both delayed and insufficient.

In addition, the Conservatives are making further cuts to the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec.

Is regional economic development not a priority for the Conservatives?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Intergovernmental Relations
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CPC

Jacques Gourde

Conservative

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, for Official Languages and for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec is continuing to help all regions of Quebec with their economic development.

We are a privileged partner of choice, and we would like other partners, such as the NDP, to vote for our budget, which will support many economic development projects in Quebec in the future.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Intergovernmental Relations
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NDP

Laurin Liu

New Democratic Party

Ms. Laurin Liu (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, with soaring rates of youth unemployment many young Canadians are being pressured into taking unpaid internships in hopes of one day landing a job. Under the Conservatives' watch, thousands of interns have been left without basic workplace protection. After finally committing in the budget to take action to protect interns, Conservatives then voted against my private member's bill, the intern protection act.

Why are handouts to the wealthy few put on the fast track while rights for vulnerable workers are put on the backburner?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Labour
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April 24, 2015