March 12, 2009

NDP

Denise Savoie

New Democratic Party

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie)

All those in favour of the motion will please say yea.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Foreign Affairs and International Development
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?

Some hon. members

Yea.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Foreign Affairs and International Development
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NDP

Denise Savoie

New Democratic Party

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie)

All those opposed will please say nay.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Foreign Affairs and International Development
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?

Some hon. members

Nay.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Foreign Affairs and International Development
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NDP

Denise Savoie

New Democratic Party

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie)

In my opinion the nays have it.

And five or more members having risen:

Call in the members.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
Sub-subtopic:   Foreign Affairs and International Development
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And the bells having rung:


NDP

Denise Savoie

New Democratic Party

The Acting Speaker (Ms. Denise Savoie)

The vote will stand deferred until Monday, March 23.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Committees of the House
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NDP

Peter Julian

New Democratic Party

Mr. Peter Julian (Burnaby—New Westminster, NDP)

Madam Speaker, I am pleased to present in the House petitions that are filed by hundreds of Canadians from coast to coast to coast, from British Columbia, Ontario and Nova Scotia. All of these petitioners call upon the government to halt any discussions with the Government of Colombia around a possible free trade agreement until such time as a human rights assessment that is done independently can fully ascertain the human rights situation in that country.

As you well know, Colombia has the worst human rights record in the Americas. It is a country that kills more trade unionists than any other country on the planet. More trade unionists die there than anywhere else. For all of those reasons, these Canadians are calling on the government to halt the process and allow an independent and fully impartial human rights assessment to take place before proceeding any further.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Colombia
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LIB

Borys Wrzesnewskyj

Liberal

Mr. Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Etobicoke Centre, Lib.)

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 36, I have the sad duty to present a petition signed by over 700 upset constituents, and counting, who are very disappointed by the decision of the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism to deport Lioubomir and Olha Nalesnik.

Mr. and Mrs. Nalesnik fled Ukraine in 1994 for security reasons. They have since that time made a positive contribution to Canadian society by working continuously throughout this period, paying their taxes and volunteering in our local community. They are exactly the type of new Canadians our country needs.

Consequently, the petitioners urge the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism to reverse this decision to deport Mr. and Mrs. Nalesnik. To do so on a finding that the security threat no longer exists would destroy the lives they have built in Canada and the positive contribution they have made to our community during the last 15 years.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Citizenship and Immigration
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CPC

Brent Rathgeber

Conservative

Mr. Brent Rathgeber (Edmonton—St. Albert, CPC)

Madam Speaker, I would like to present this petition signed by over 200 Canadians from the Edmonton—St. Albert constituency, calling for Parliament to enact legislation that will make the production and distribution of explicit pornography illegal in Canada.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Pornography
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NDP

Pat Martin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Pat Martin (Winnipeg Centre, NDP)

Madam Speaker, I have a petition signed by thousands of citizens from across Canada who call upon the House of Commons to take note that asbestos is the greatest industrial killer that the world has ever known and that more people in fact die from asbestos-related disease than all other occupational causes combined, yet Canada remains one of the largest producers and exporters of asbestos in the world and that Canada spends millions of dollars subsidizing the asbestos industry.

These petitioners call that corporate welfare for corporate serial killers. These petitioners are calling upon Parliament to ban asbestos in all its forms and to end all government subsidies of the asbestos industry, both in Canada and abroad, and to stop blocking international health and safety conventions designed to protect workers from asbestos such as the Rotterdam Convention.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Asbestos
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LIB

Dan McTeague

Liberal

Hon. Dan McTeague (Pickering—Scarborough East, Lib.)

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition that calls upon the Canadian government to respond to the proposed suppression of religious freedom in Sri Lanka, and requests that the government, particularly the Minister of Foreign Affairs, take whatever steps necessary to exert its influence and prevent this contravention of basic human rights as enshrined in article 18 of the UN Declaration of Human Rights and International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights with regard to worship and the practice of faith of citizens.

This is signed by over 100 residents from Scarborough, Pickering and Ajax, Ontario.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Sri Lanka
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CPC

Rob Moore

Conservative

Mr. Rob Moore (Fundy Royal, CPC)

Madam Speaker, I am presenting a petition signed by a number of citizens from Ontario. The petitioners call upon the government to take strong action in the Criminal Code on animal cruelty.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Animal Cruelty
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CPC

Rob Moore

Conservative

Mr. Rob Moore (Fundy Royal, CPC)

Madam Speaker, I am presenting a petition from a number of students in Saskatchewan. The petitioners call for a toughening of the laws dealing with illicit drugs, particularly illicit drugs in schools.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Illicit Drugs
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NDP

Irene Mathyssen

New Democratic Party

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

Madam Speaker, I have two petitions to present.

The first petition is from a significant number of citizens from London—Fanshawe who petition the Government of Canada to support a universal declaration on animal welfare. There is scientific consensus and public acknowledgement that animals can feel pain and suffer. All efforts should be made to prevent animal cruelty and reduce animal suffering.

Over a billion people around the world rely on animals for their livelihoods and many others rely on animals for companionship. Animals are often significantly affected by natural disasters, yet seldom during relief efforts and emergency planning, despite their recognized importance to humans, are they considered.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Animal Cruelty
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NDP

Irene Mathyssen

New Democratic Party

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

Madam Speaker, the second petition is from a number of seniors in my riding who are concerned that Statistics Canada made a major error in its calculations of the consumer price index. That resulted in Canada's inflation numbers being underrated by half a percentage point since 2001.

This mistake affects anyone whose benefits are tied to the CPI, including recipients of Canada pension, old age security and the guaranteed income supplement. They have been underpaid by a compounded half a percentage point a year, thereby losing benefits totalling over $1 billion for the seniors of Canada.

The petitioners call upon the Parliament of Canada to take full responsibility for this error and take the required steps to repay every Canadian who was shortchanged by a government program because of this miscalculation.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Consumer Price Index
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LIB

Rodger Cuzner

Liberal

Mr. Rodger Cuzner (Cape Breton—Canso, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to present a petition on behalf of the Inverness South Fishermen's Association. These are fishermen who ply their trade from Inverness, Mabou Mines, down through Baxters Cove and Murphys Pond and along the west coast of Cape Breton, Little Judique Harbour. Sixty-five fishermen have signed this petition.

The petitioners call upon Parliament to investigate whether there has been an unreasonable and inequitable fettering of discretion with respect to the Government of Canada's allotment of snow crab fishing licenses in area 12 among the fishermen of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Nova Scotia. They call for a 3% annual assignment of annual total quota for area 12 to the association.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
Sub-subtopic:   Fisheries
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CPC

Tom Lukiwski

Conservative

Mr. Tom Lukiwski (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, CPC)

Madam Speaker, the following questions will be answered today: Nos. 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 18, 19, 20, 21, 32 and 36.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
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NDP

Dawn Black

New Democratic Party

Ms. Dawn Black

With regards to the use of Claymore munitions by the Canadian Forces (CF) in Afghanistan: (a) does the CF have special doctrine for the use of the Claymore in Afghanistan; (b) does the CF chain of command give instructions with regard to the use of the Claymore and obligations under the Ottawa Protocol; (c) is the chain of command aware of uses of the Claymore that have not followed standard procedures in Afghanistan; (d) is the Minister of National Defence aware of any use of the Claymore that violated the Ottawa Protocol; and (e) is the Minister or chain of command aware of any use of the Claymore in which the intended target of the weapon was responsible for its detonation?

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 4
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CPC

Peter MacKay

Conservative

Hon. Peter MacKay (Minister of National Defence and Minister for the Atlantic Gateway, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, in response to (a), the use of a Defensive Command Detonated Weapon C19, sometimes referred to as a “Claymore”, is restricted by Canadian Forces doctrine, and further clarified by the rules of engagement for Operation ATHENA issued to Canadian Forces personnel in theatre.

In response to (b), yes, the Canadian Forces publication entitled “Defensive Operations” provides information on the use of the C19. The publication “Ambush and Counter-Ambush” provides further information on the use of support weapons, such as the C19, for ambush tactics, techniques and procedures.

Soldiers and officers are instructed in the use of the C19 and the associated doctrine during their infantry training. Each task force is provided with C19 training in Canada before deploying to Afghanistan. This allows the Infantry battle group to practise testing, setting up and initiating the C19.

In its use of the C19, the Canadian Forces follow the International Law of Armed Conflict as set out in the Joint Doctrine manual, “Law of Armed Conflict at the Operational and Tactical Levels”. The manual, at paragraph 511(4), provides as follows:

4. The use of an anti-personnel mine that is manually detonated (for example, by land line or electronic signal from a remote or protected position) by a [Canadian Forces] member is not prohibited. Therefore, the use of an explosive device such as a “Claymore Mine” is not prohibited if it is manually detonated. Any anti-personnel mine that is designed to be exploded automatically by the “presence, proximity or contact of a person” cannot be lawfully used by the [Canadian Forces]. The “Claymore Area Defence System” is not prohibited if it is command detonated. If horizontal fragmentation weapons which propel fragments in a horizontal arc of less than 90 degrees, such as the Claymore, are placed on or above the ground, they may be used for a maximum period of 72 hours if they are located in the immediate proximity to the military unit that emplaced them, and the area is monitored by military personnel to ensure the effective exclusion of civilians.

In response to (c), (d) and (e), Canadian Forces leadership is not aware of any incident involving the placement or detonation of C19s in a manner inconsistent with Canadian Forces doctrine, rules of engagement, or the Ottawa convention.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Questions on the Order Paper
Sub-subtopic:   Question No. 4
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March 12, 2009