April 9, 2008

CPC

Jim Prentice

Conservative

Hon. Jim Prentice (Minister of Industry, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, this is not the case. The question is premature. I am studying the matter and examining the sale of MDA under the Investment Canada Act. In accordance with the Remote Sensing Space Systems Act. Canada will continue to use the RADARSAT-2 satellite.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Aerospace Industry
Permalink
BQ

Francine Lalonde

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Francine Lalonde (La Pointe-de-l'Île, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, ATK, the company that wants to buy RADARSAT-2, is one of the largest weapons and munitions manufacturers in the United States. This company manufactures missiles, munitions and landmines. It is also involved in the militarization of space, and there is proof—ATK has been involved in the American missile defence shield.

How can the Minister of Industry believe that selling such a state-of-the-art satellite to an American company that manufactures landmines and is involved in the militarization of space would be advantageous to Quebec and Canada?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Aerospace Industry
Permalink
CPC

Jim Prentice

Conservative

Hon. Jim Prentice (Minister of Industry, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I would point out to the hon. member that the transaction is a proposed transaction. She will be aware from my previous statements in the House that any decisions which I have made or will make in the future with respect to this matter are governed by the Investment Canada Act. I will abide strictly by the requirements that are imposed in law under that statute.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Aerospace Industry
Permalink
LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Markham—Unionville, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the IMF has just reported that the global financial crisis could result in losses of $1 trillion. Serious governments, like the British and the Americans, have prepared detailed plans of action which they will be discussing at the G-7 finance meeting this Friday.

What concrete plans or ideas will Canada's government be bringing to the table?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
Permalink
CPC

Jim Flaherty

Conservative

Hon. Jim Flaherty (Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I am sure, if the hon. member has an opportunity to read the IMF report, which I have, he will see that Canada and the performance of this government are complimented.

We have been specifically chosen by the IMF as an example of what governments should do because we did it on a timely basis last year on October 30 with the economic stimulus that this country needed to create jobs. That is exactly what we did. As I said, we were lauded by the IMF in its report released today.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
Permalink
LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Markham—Unionville, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, so it sounds like he will be G-7 window dressing with nothing concrete to put on the table on the global crisis.

Canadians expect their governments to show leadership in global economic affairs, like when the previous Liberal finance minister jumped on the global stage and successfully pushed for the G-20, an assembly of the 20 largest nations in the world.

Other than fancy trips for ministers, what is the point of being a G-7 country if the government has no ideas and nothing to put on the table?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
Permalink
CPC

Jim Flaherty

Conservative

Hon. Jim Flaherty (Minister of Finance, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the member opposite really should read the report before he asks questions about it.

Another example used by the international community reflecting on Canada's leadership is with respect to the non-bank-backed asset backed commercial paper and the Montreal accord, and the work on that accord led by Purdy Crawford, a great Canadian, who has developed in the private sector, with the facilitation of the Bank of Canada and the governor and the Department of Finance, a solution to that which we hope will pass with the investors on April 25.

Canaccord made an important announcement today with respect to the private investors. I hope--

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Economy
Permalink
LIB
LIB

Sue Barnes

Liberal

Hon. Sue Barnes (London West, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the Ontario government has pledged $17 million to keep open and expand the Ford plant in Essex. Ford is waiting for the federal government to match this or the project might not go ahead.

Will the government commit $17 million for the Ford plant in Essex, yes or no?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Automotive Industry
Permalink
CPC

Jim Prentice

Conservative

Hon. Jim Prentice (Minister of Industry, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, let us make sure that the record is clear.

That hon. member has sat on her hands for 13 years in relation to the issue of competitiveness. She sat on her hands for the 2008 budget that contained the automotive innovation fund. In 2007 she voted against the best manufacturing budget we have seen in a generation.

Her efforts could only be described successful in the way that Churchill described Liberals: lurching from failure to failure with enthusiasm.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Automotive Industry
Permalink
LIB

Sue Barnes

Liberal

Hon. Sue Barnes (London West, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, that certainly did not answer the question that was asked.

Can the minister answer the question? Will the government commit $17 million for the Ford plant in Essex, yes or no? Try again.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Automotive Industry
Permalink
CPC

Jim Prentice

Conservative

Hon. Jim Prentice (Minister of Industry, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the hypocrisy is astounding. If it had been up to that member, there would not be a fund at all to fund anything. She should leave Ford to me. She should be in the House to vote on other matters that are before the House.

As for the record that she has left, she is going to have to be accountable to her constituents. She has left the faintest footprints with respect to industry in Canada.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Automotive Industry
Permalink
CPC

Scott Reid

Conservative

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, there is a growing consensus in the international community on the need for a principled response to the human rights situation in Quebec, or in Tibet.

Only yesterday, Kevin Rudd, the Australian Prime Minister--

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Tibet
Permalink
?

Some hon. members

Oh, oh!

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Tibet
Permalink
LIB

Peter Milliken

Liberal

The Speaker

Order, please. We have to be able to hear the question. The hon. member for Lanark—Frontenac—Lennox and Addington has the floor. We will have a little order please.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Tibet
Permalink
CPC

Scott Reid

Conservative

Mr. Scott Reid

As the saying goes, Mr. Speaker, I misspoke myself.

Only yesterday, Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd urged the government of the People's Republic of China to avoid further violence and to find a solution through dialogue with the Dalai Lama.

Could the foreign affairs minister say whether the Canadian government's policy on Tibet is similar to the one expressed yesterday by Prime Minister Rudd?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Tibet
Permalink
CPC

Maxime Bernier

Conservative

Hon. Maxime Bernier (Minister of Foreign Affairs, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for her question. As we know, the situation in Quebec has been very good since Quebeckers elected a Conservative government.

However, we have very huge concerns for human rights in Tibet and China. That is why we continue to urge the Chinese government to engage in a dialogue with the Dalai Lama, to fully respect human rights, to respect peaceful protests, and to show restraint in dealing with the situation in Tibet.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Tibet
Permalink
NDP

Olivia Chow

New Democratic Party

Ms. Olivia Chow (Trinity—Spadina, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Immigration is so worried about the damaging, offensive and sweeping changes. I am astounded that she will not tell the truth. No, the charter will not apply to those who are trying to come into Canada. No, humanitarian or compassionate grounds will not apply to those who are outside of Canada, and no, families will not be able to come to Canada faster and easier.

Will the minister drop her half-truths and really fix the immigration system?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Citizenship and Immigration
Permalink
CPC

Diane Finley

Conservative

Hon. Diane Finley (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the level of fearmongering from the NDP today is absolutely off the scale. I can assure you, Mr. Speaker, that the instructions we will be issuing to help bring more people here to fill the jobs, to be reunited with their families, and to get it done sooner will of course be charter compliant.

They will be done after consultations with the provinces, the territories and other key stakeholders. They will be approved by cabinet. They will be published and the results of our efforts will be published. Why do those members not want to help us get the backlog down from 10 years?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Citizenship and Immigration
Permalink
NDP

Olivia Chow

New Democratic Party

Ms. Olivia Chow (Trinity—Spadina, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the minister should stop giving herself sweeping powers to end run the existing system.

She said that the system was crumbling. She is trying to destroy it. We have seen this kind of discretionary power turn into discrimination, and I wonder whether my family will be able to come into this country if her immigration policies pass this House.

These changes are cold, callous and damaging. Will the minister change and fix the immigration system properly instead of crumbling and killing the entire system?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Citizenship and Immigration
Permalink

April 9, 2008