November 23, 2005

NDP

Jack Layton

New Democratic Party

Hon. Jack Layton (Toronto—Danforth, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that Liberal words on climate change mean nothing. It is their actions that speak louder. Our emissions are dramatically up; over $1 billion in subsidies to oil and coal. We have no strategy to produce cars that produce less emissions even though the NDP offered one to the government over two years ago.

Now we have the Oshawa plant needing to produce a new model. Why is there no plan to start building the green cars that Canadians want, that can reduce pollution right here in Canada and have them built in Oshawa with Canadian workers?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of the Environment, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I will be very pleased to send a new copy of the climate change plan to the leader of the NDP. He will see that we will invest $10 billion over the years to decrease greenhouse gas emissions. I am very proud that Canada yesterday listed greenhouse gas emissions against CEPA. We did it and we would have been pleased to do it with the leader of the NDP. However, instead of that, he wants to join the Conservative leader who wants to kill Kyoto. It is a shame.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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CPC

Bob Mills

Conservative

Mr. Bob Mills (Red Deer, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, I want to repeat that just days before the COP 11 conference in Montreal, we have this new report from the UN. It shows Canada is the worst performer on the planet when it comes to reducing greenhouse gases. We are 25% above 1990 levels and that number is growing.

Canadians want to know how the environment minister will explain this embarrassment in front of the world?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of the Environment, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, Canada has a very growing economy because of this government protecting our industries. Instead of our industries going to China and other countries, the industries stay in Canada. It good for the environment because we have the capacity to decrease emissions with good technology and we will do it through a very compelling climate change plan. What party is speaking? A party that has no plan, no commitment and no conviction about the environment.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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CPC

Michael Chong

Conservative

Mr. Michael Chong (Wellington—Halton Hills, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, just a few days before the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Montreal we have a new UN report indicating that Canada is the worst country on the planet in terms of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

For 12 years this government has been long on promises and short on action and our emissions have increased by 24% according to the report.

Will the government be frank enough to admit that the Kyoto plan has resulted in increased emissions?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of the Environment, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, he is talking through his hat. Emissions would increase if we did what the Conservatives want to do, which is nothing at all—in other words, withdraw from the Kyoto protocol thereby upsetting the world wide balance required if we are to reduce emissions everywhere.

I remind hon. members that the Conservative critic said that Conservatives should not go before the electorate without a plan to address climate change. They still do not have a plan and Canadians will let them know how they feel about it.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   The Environment
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CPC

Jeff Watson

Conservative

Mr. Jeff Watson (Essex, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, former Canada Steamship Lines' chief engineers recently pulled back the veil of secrecy on CSL operations. CSL ships, they report, have been dumping tonnes of ore pellets into the Great Lakes when no one was looking. Sierra Club director, Elizabeth May, said that it was illegal. The present Prime Minister agreed in 1990 when he said, “Poisoning the water is a crime and persistent and wilful polluters must be treated as criminals and criminals must go to jail”.

When will the Prime Minister commit his government to pursue legal action against CSL for polluting our Great Lakes?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Canada Steamship Lines
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LIB

Geoff Regan

Liberal

Hon. Geoff Regan (Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this government takes the quality of our lakes and the environment very seriously and acts assiduously. The Coast Guard of course does this, as well as Transport Canada.

My hon. colleague should support the measures this government has taken in this regard.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Canada Steamship Lines
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CPC

Jeff Watson

Conservative

Mr. Jeff Watson (Essex, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, he missed the point. Canada Steamship Lines broke the law. It illegally dumped tonnes of ore pellets into the Great Lakes when no one was looking, and apparently not even the Prime Minister when he held active management of CSL.

Mark Mattson, water quality watchdog, said, “You can't put anything on the bottom of the lake.... There is no way around the laws...”, unless perhaps one becomes a cabinet minister or a prime minister.

Canada Steamship Lines repeatedly broke the law. Why will the Prime Minister not commit his government to legal action against CSL? Is the family business entitled to pollute?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Canada Steamship Lines
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LIB

Stéphane Dion

Liberal

Hon. Stéphane Dion (Minister of the Environment, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, nobody is above the law. Everybody must respect the law. If anything happens in this country that is outside the law we act because we have regulations. It is because we have an environmental policy, something that the Conservative Party is unable to imagine.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Canada Steamship Lines
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BQ

Meili Faille

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Meili Faille (Vaudreuil-Soulanges, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, when the Immigration Act was amended in 2002, the government dropped the number of board members hearing refugee claims from two to one. In order to allay concerns over this, the former Minister of Citizenship and Immigration said in June 2002 that he had promised the Canadian Council for Refugees that there would be an appeal division within the year.

Why has the current Minister of Citizenship and Immigration decided not to implement the refugee appeal division, thereby reneging on a commitment his own colleague made?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration
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LIB

Joe Volpe

Liberal

Hon. Joseph Volpe (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the UN still considers us a world leader, particularly in this area where we have excellent results. For example, there was a 2% increase last year in the number of refugees admitted to Canada.

I hope that the hon. member will recognize the excellent results of our system.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration
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BQ

Meili Faille

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Meili Faille (Vaudreuil-Soulanges, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, according to the Canada Border Services Agency, Ottawa has lost track of 43,000 illegal immigrants, a 20% increase since 2002. The lack of an appeal division encourages people to go into hiding because they have no faith in the system.

Will the minister admit that not only is his decision not to implement the appeal division irresponsible with regard to human rights, but it flies in the face of Canada's international commitments?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration
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LIB

Joe Volpe

Liberal

Hon. Joseph Volpe (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member refuses to recognize that, according to the UN, Canada leads the way in this regard.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Immigration
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BQ

Paul Crête

Bloc Québécois

Mr. Paul Crête (Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, on October 5, the House of Commons formally called upon the government to establish a policy of assistance to the textile and clothing industries. The textile and clothing industries really need that policy to be put in place now.

Will the Minister of Finance decide to announce this plan, which is essential to the survival of these industries and of hundreds of jobs?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Textile and Clothing Industry
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LIB

Jacques Saada

Liberal

Hon. Jacques Saada (Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Minister responsible for the Francophonie, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, on October 28, 2005, the Government of Canada announced the elimination of the 14% customs tariff on imported fabrics. That measure is retroactive to January 1, 2005. It will save Canadian manufacturers in the order of $29 million annually. This is in addition to the program for Canadian textiles, through which 173 projects have been approved in Quebec, for a total of $10.3 million. It is also in addition to CANtex, which has allocated $26.7 million nationally since October 13, 2004, $14.6 million of that in Quebec. In Quebec alone, 43 projects were approved for a total of $3.2 million.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Textile and Clothing Industry
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BQ

Paul Crête

Bloc Québécois

Mr. Paul Crête (Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, the House of Commons demanded a new policy back on October 5, 2005, and the current government's actions do not include it.

This reminds us of the softwood lumber situation, where it took the government three and one-half years to finally heed the demands of the Bloc Québécois and to come up with some semblance of a plan.

Is the minister waiting for the textile and clothing industries to disappear completely before announcing any concrete measures to save them from the catastrophe everyone can see coming? It will be on the government's head.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Textile and Clothing Industry
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LIB

Jacques Saada

Liberal

Hon. Jacques Saada (Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec and Minister responsible for the Francophonie, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I would tell my hon. colleague to go and see how things are at Stedfast, in Granby, or Empire Shirt in Louiseville, before saying that the textile industry is doomed.

Those people over there are constantly making more demands, but when they have an opportunity to walk the talk, they do not take it. When a budget increase was proposed to help that sector, they refused it. They voted against that budget. This is hypocritical. I keep on saying this, and will continue to say it over the coming weeks: they have no right and no credibility in that sector.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Textile and Clothing Industry
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CPC

Monte Solberg

Conservative

Mr. Monte Solberg (Medicine Hat, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance is sending the signal that he might be starting the very long climb down from the income trust debacle. After devastating the markets by musing about whether trusts had a future under his watch, he then told the House that three-quarters of the public were with him on the trust issue. Yeah right, we really believe that.

Now that the minister has had his nose bloodied by seniors and small investors who rely on income trusts, will he finally back away and declare that income trusts are here to stay and he will not raise taxes on them?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Income Trusts
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LIB

Ralph Goodale

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, we are conducting a very useful consultation process that has elicited a number of valuable points of view.

It is very important when making decisions to base those decisions on the best advice one can get. Many of those seniors to whom the hon. gentleman has referred and many other Canadians have come forward to give me the benefit of their opinions and I value those opinions.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Income Trusts
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November 23, 2005