May 9, 2003

BQ

Monique Guay

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Monique Guay (Laurentides, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, if they want to help the workers, they should do so now. The government has the means to act. The Bloc Quebecois is offering its solutions to guide such actions.

Will the government admit that if it were to improve the employment insurance system, it would be able to expand the impact of its assistance, to include not only fishery workers, but also those in the softwood lumber sector?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Employment Insurance
Permalink
LIB

Diane St-Jacques

Liberal

Ms. Diane St-Jacques (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources Development, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the situation is certainly not easy for people who work in the fishery, but we are trying our best to help them. That is why we are working for the good of the fishers, in conjunction with the ACOA, Economic Development Canada and the other governments in order to find solutions to this difficult situation.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Employment Insurance
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CA

Gerry Ritz

Canadian Alliance

Mr. Gerry Ritz (Battlefords—Lloydminster, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Defence said yesterday that the 1999 statement of requirements for the Sea King replacement is his bible. Apparently he is quoting from the King Jean version.

The minister claims that he is trying to get new helicopters as quickly as possible, but the contract stipulates Canada take no deliveries for at least four to five years. He claims the 1999 requirements have not been changed, but we know the military was ordered last July to dumb down the requirements to qualify Eurocopter.

Is the minister just trying to reinforce our view that he is totally incompetent, or is he misleading the House?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   National Defence
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LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I think I made it very clear yesterday, but since those members do not seem to get it, I will repeat the point.

The statement of requirements was developed in 1999 with the approval of the military leadership of this country. That statement of requirements has not changed one iota. Let me repeat, that statement of requirements is the bible on the helicopter file. It has not changed one iota. I think hon. members on the other side should begin to comprehend this point.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   National Defence
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CA

Scott Reid

Canadian Alliance

Mr. Scott Reid (Lanark—Carleton, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, the government imposes a levy on all blank recording media regardless of end use apparently on the assumption that all users are potential copyright thieves and that the guilty and the innocent should be punished equally.

What this does is punish those who use large quantities of recording media for perfectly legal purposes, such as a small business in my riding that distributes computer training manuals for CD-ROMs. The tax currently costs 21¢ for each CD-ROM the company sells, and this could soon rise to 59¢.

When will the government amend this law to eliminate its penalty on small business owners who use large quantities of recording media?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Copyright Act
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LIB

Allan Rock

Liberal

Hon. Allan Rock (Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the member well knows that the whole idea behind the measure was to try to ensure that the copyright of owners, people who created the art, was respected. It was put in place to ensure that when people created something of value and put it in the marketplace, that they would get the protection they deserved and that the law could afford.

It is a balance on every case, and the copyright tribunal has tried to establish that balance. It is always under review to ensure we get it right, and we will continue to do that.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Copyright Act
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BQ

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Jocelyne Girard-Bujold (Jonquière, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, the largest forestry cooperative in Quebec, located in Laterrière in my riding, is no longer able to pay its creditors. Its president says that the softwood lumber crisis is largely responsible for this situation.

Does the Minister for International Trade finally understand that the possible closing of this sawmill would provide yet more evidence that his assistance plan of last fall does not meet the needs of the current situation and that he must proceed to the next phase as soon as possible?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Softwood Lumber
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LIB

Herb Dhaliwal

Liberal

Hon. Herb Dhaliwal (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the government provided a comprehensive package to deal with softwood lumber, including community adjustment, research and development and looking for new markets for Canadian wood products.

The hon. member has not stated with which part of that comprehensive package that she disagrees. This is something that has been supported by Canadians across the country and she should work with us to support that because I think it is the right way to go.

The hon. member should stand up and say how good this package is and how well it is working to ensure we protect and support Canadians across the country.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Softwood Lumber
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BQ

Jocelyne Girard-Bujold

Bloc Québécois

Ms. Jocelyne Girard-Bujold (Jonquière, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, the minister is talking about the past; I am asking him about the present. The 450 members of the Laterrière cooperative have $13 million in shares in this company and now want to save their pension fund.

What does the minister plan to tell these workers, whose jobs are threatened, because the government is dragging its feet on introducing a new assistance plan?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Softwood Lumber
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LIB

Claude Drouin

Liberal

Hon. Claude Drouin (Secretary of State (Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec), Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I want to say that we have implemented measures to the tune of $361 million. Of the $110 million for communities, $22 million is available now. Of this, the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean region is to get $3.5 million, and another $2 million will go to the Consortium de recherche sur la forêt boréale for research on the black spruce.

These are concrete measures. This is phase one, and we will continue to support the workers in the regions.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Softwood Lumber
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CA

Garry Breitkreuz

Canadian Alliance

Mr. Garry Breitkreuz (Yorkton—Melville, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, the member for Malpeque was once opposed to Bill C-68 because of its search without a warrant provisions.

In 1995 the same MP questioned justice officials about ways to enforce gun registration without turning innocent people into criminals. Why has the MP suddenly become Bill C-68's greatest promoter? Is it perhaps because he is now the Solicitor General?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Firearms Registry
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LIB

Wayne Easter

Liberal

Hon. Wayne Easter (Solicitor General of Canada, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, my golly, the member for Yorkton—Melville obviously does not realize the world has changed since 1995. I know he is back in that time and age, that is for sure.

If we look at the record, we will see exactly where I stood. Look at the voting record, not statements that were made, as the Minister of National Defence talked about earlier. We debate issues on this side of the House. We are not afraid of having differences of opinion. We do not always vote the party line as they do over there.

The fact of the matter is the world has moved on. These are different times.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Firearms Registry
Permalink
CA

John Williams

Canadian Alliance

Mr. John Williams (St. Albert, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, talk about a legacy. The Prime Minister is on his way out but some well connected Liberals are on their way in.

We have found that election defeat for former Liberal MPs parachutes them right on to the gravy train. David Dingwall now has a five-year term at the Royal Canadian Mint that will cost us $1.2 million.

Pierrette Ringuette-Maltais can look forward to 27 years in the plush red chamber, at an anticipated cost of over $3 million.

Could the Prime Minister tell us what the real cost of his pathetic legacy will really be?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Government Appointments
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LIB

Allan Rock

Liberal

Hon. Allan Rock (Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am astonished that it is not as evident to that member as it is to the rest of the country that appointments are made on the basis of merit, whether it is to the Senate or any other place.

The Prime Minister and the government have appointed people of talent, skill and commitment to do an outstanding job for Canadians and the country, and we are proud of every one of them.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Government Appointments
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LIB

Paddy Torsney

Liberal

Ms. Paddy Torsney (Burlington, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, when the Information Commissioner last appeared at the Standing Committee on Government Operations and Estimates, he said that the government needed to improve the management of information throughout its lifecycle.

In fact, he said that there was a pressing need to update the management of government information policy. My question is for the Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board.

What has the government done to address the commissioner's concerns and the concerns of all Canadians?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Information Management
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LIB

Tony Tirabassi

Liberal

Mr. Tony Tirabassi (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I wish to report to the House that indeed a new policy on the management of government information came into effect on May 1. The policy responds to some of the concerns of the Information Commissioner by outlining the responsibility of all government employees to ensure that the management of information is done in both an effective and efficient manner.

As well, the policy promotes the management of information in a privacy-protective manner that supports informed decision making and the delivery of high quality programs, services and information through a variety of channels, and in both official languages.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Information Management
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NDP

Alexa McDonough

New Democratic Party

Ms. Alexa McDonough (Halifax, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, trade challenges from south of the border are threatening more Canadian jobs. The latest U.S. call for tariffs terrifies blueberry pickers and processors. They know what has happened to softwood lumber. They know what has happened to our wheat farmers.

If duties are imposed on our blueberries, jobs will be wiped out in Nova Scotia, Quebec and other provinces. Some aboriginal communities already struggling will be devastated.

What action has the government taken to ensure that the blueberry industry does not get the raspberry?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Trade
Permalink
LIB

Murray Calder

Liberal

Mr. Murray Calder (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Trade, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, it is premature right now to speculate if the U.S. industry will petition for a trade remedy case against blueberries from Canada. Such investigations require formal petitions containing evidence if injury is due to dumping and/or subsidization. We are not aware of any such evidence so far.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Trade
Permalink
NDP

Alexa McDonough

New Democratic Party

Ms. Alexa McDonough (Halifax, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, that was some defence of our blueberry industry.

Yesterday Bush managed to keep a straight face when he went after Iran for violating arms control treaties. When Bush does not like an arms control treaty, he does not violate it, he just tears it up. That is what he did with the ABM treaty so he could plow ahead with star wars.

Would the defence minister explain why it is okay for some people to abandon arms control treaties and others not?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
Permalink
LIB

John McCallum

Liberal

Hon. John McCallum (Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, it seems this morning that the NDP wants us to move slower on ballistic missile defence, while the Canadian Alliance seems to want us to move faster on ballistic missile defence.

This leads me to conclude that probably we are moving at about the right speed.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
Permalink

May 9, 2003