November 17, 1997

REF

Roy H. Bailey

Reform

Mr. Roy Bailey (Souris—Moose Mountain, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to bring attention to a small town in southeast Saskatchewan by the name of Redvers. It is a recipient of the prestigious five star award from the Federation of Canadian Municipalities awarded to communities that excel in providing access to persons with disabilities.

The new health care centre which is under construction will contain space for laboratory, radiology, community health services, a medical clinic, emergency, observation and maternity rooms as well as six acute care beds.

The Redvers and District Community Health Foundation Inc. is building the centre without one cent of provincial money and without one cent of federal money. Once again local initiative leads the people in my constituency.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Health
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LIB

Susan Whelan

Liberal

Ms. Susan Whelan (Essex, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this past week, November 11 to November 15, 1997, the Minister for International Trade led a very successful and ground breaking team Canada trade mission including 120 business women from across Canada, members of Parliament from Parkdale—High Park, Barrie—Simcoe—Bradford, Kitchener Centre, Senator Céline Hervieux-Payette and me to Washington in an effort to increase the number of firms led by women exporting to the lucrative U.S. market.

The three day Canadian business women's international trade mission was designed to introduce potential exporters to the U.S. market and specifically to export business opportunities and form partnerships in the the mid-Atlantic states.

Canada's exports to that region amounted to $11.5 million in 1996. The program enables Canadian participants to pursue business opportunities with U.S. firms through mentoring, networking and partnering activities. The participants attended a series of export development workshops on topics ranging from export strategies to marketing and international business financing.

Our team Canada trade missions are the type of leadership the government provides to ensure that Canada continues to prosper into the new century.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   International Trade
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BQ

Pauline Picard

Bloc Québécois

Mrs. Pauline Picard (Drummond, BQ)

Mr. Speaker, is Canada truly the “best country in the world to live in”?

Two weeks ago, the Minister of Health told us that drinking water comes under provincial jurisdiction, while the equipment used to transport it is the federal government's responsibility.

Nothing surprises us any longer, since we already know that in Quebec the bottom of the St. Lawrence River comes under federal jurisdiction, while the water itself is the responsibility of the province. Fish is a federal responsibility but, once out of the water, it becomes a provincial one. Fishers' boats are registered under federal laws, but their construction is subject to provincial standards and, of course, federal safety regulations. The shores of the St. Lawrence come under provincial jurisdiction, but ports belong to the federal government.

And now the health minister is proud to add to the “best mess in the world to live in” with Bill C-14.

Sovereignty cannot be achieved too soon. We have to get out of this mess.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Drinking Water
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LIB

Raymonde Folco

Liberal

Ms. Raymonde Folco (Laval West, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, last week, the former Bloc Quebecois leader said his party should leave the scene.

At last, a sovereignist has suddenly realized that the Bloc Quebecois was taking root, in spite of claiming to be a temporary party. It is the first time that a Bloc Quebecois official alludes so openly to the possibility of a defeat of the yes side in a future referendum.

The former leader also feels that, win or lose, the Bloc Quebecois should leave after the next referendum.

Under the circumstances, and until its demise, the Bloc Quebecois should work much more seriously to try to improve Canadian federalism. It is time for the Bloc to take on this task.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Bloc Quebecois
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REF

Randy White

Reform

Mr. Randy White (Langley—Abbotsford, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, once again I must outline an excellent example of the inability of the Liberal government to deport illegal immigrants.

The Baljinder Dhillon family of Abbotsford was ordered removed from Canada in 1993 but never left the country. The family merely waited for three years to go by before applying under the DROC, that is the deferred removal order class program, to be allowed to stay because during these three years they had established ties in Canada.

I contacted Immigration Canada to check on the removal order and was told that the family's case was not even on the list to force a removal, meaning the family could conceivably stay forever without Immigration Canada ever pursuing the deportation.

I continue to be amazed that Immigration Canada has neither the physical ability nor the desire to deport people who have been under removal for more than four years. In this instance I wonder why Immigration Canada bothered to order the family removed in the first place. Why carry the ball all the way down the field only to drop it?

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Immigration
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LIB

Rey D. Pagtakhan

Liberal

Mr. Rey D. Pagtakhan (Winnipeg North—St. Paul, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, this week and next the eyes of the world will be fixed upon Canada when it hosts the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation forum, the culmination of Canada's year of Asia-Pacific.

The forum is a golden opportunity for Canada to help APEC move in a direction which reflects the needs and values of Canadians and to expand its influence in the region.

APEC members have a combined gross national product of $16 trillion U.S., which is about half the world's annual trade. Last year Canada's trade with APEC members, excluding the United States, reached $58.6 billion.

The Prime Minister has underlined the importance to Canada's economic future of bringing APEC to Canada for developments in Asia-Pacific touch the lives of Canadians more and more as a result of growing business, immigration and cultural ties.

Canada must commit itself, in addition to continued economic engagement, to learning more about the cultures of our neighbours thereby reinforcing economic co-operation in the Asia-Pacific region on the basis of shared partnership, shared responsibility and common good.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Asia-Pacific
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NDP

Gordon Earle

New Democratic Party

Mr. Gordon Earle (Halifax West, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the anniversary of the death of Louis Riel was yesterday. I know I speak on behalf of my colleague, the hon. member for Churchill River in Saskatchewan, who is Metis, and the rest of the New Democratic caucus when I call upon the government to correct horrible historic injustices.

Now is the time to officially exonerate Louis Riel and with it the dark cloud that hangs over the federal government. Now is the time to go beyond recognizing Riel as a founder of Manitoba and officially recognize him as a Father of Confederation.

The refusal of the federal government to acknowledge that the Metis fall under subsection 91(24) of the constitution is one of the worst forms of official federal discrimination according to the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples.

The anniversary of the death of Louis Riel would be a very fitting time to correct these injustices.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Louis Riel
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LIB

Claude Drouin

Liberal

Mr. Claude Drouin (Beauce, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I would like to repeat in this House a piece of excellent news for the great Québec-Chaudière-Appalaches region.

On November 7, the hon. secretary of state responsible for the Federal Office of Regional Development gave a highly positive report on the regional technology fund. After a mere year of existence, thanks to contributions totalling $3.3 million, this fund has made ten high-tech projects possible. These projects, in which close to $17 million will be invested, will create 187 jobs in the greater Québec-Chaudière-Appalaches region.

This initiative, undertaken by the government in partnership with Gatiq-Technorégion, will help make this region a centre of excellence for the companies involved in the new economy.

This is once again proof of the important role played by the Canadian government, via FORDQ and its secretary of state.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Regional Development
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PC

Elsie Wayne

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Elsie Wayne (Saint John, PC)

Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate the University of New Brunswick, Saint John campus, for acquiring the support of CIDA for a major international project.

The project entitled “Community based conservation management: China and Vietnam” will support a five year project that will respond to major gaps that exist in species conservation and habitat protection for China and Vietnam.

Through community oriented field training activities the project will develop institutional expertise in ecosystem health and conservation management and enhance linkages between the two countries.

This is the third international development project the university has received funding for. With the help of CIDA and the leadership of Dr. Rick Meiner, vice-president of UNBSJ, our university is emerging as the leader in the maritimes in the field of international development.

I say congratulations to UNBSJ and good luck with its new project.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   International Development
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LIB

John Richardson

Liberal

Mr. John Richardson (Perth—Middlesex, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, it is with great pleasure that I rise in the House today to pay tribute to our peacekeepers in Bosnia.

I had the opportunity to visit some of our peacekeepers last week where I saw first hand their efforts to keep peace in that unfortunate country, enabling its people to rebuild their lives after years of war.

I observed significant progress in making it safer by ridding the country of the scourge of land mines. I met with pilots and the support staff of the CF-18 squadron based at Aviano, Italy, whose task was to enforce the no fly zone over Bosnia. I had the pleasure once again of meeting them as they return today after doing a job well done in Bosnia.

The peacekeepers in Bosnia are fine examples of dedicated, courageous professionals of the Canadian forces who have placed themselves at risk to help nations and peoples to find peaceful solutions to their disagreements. I am proud of these men and women, as are all Canadians.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Peacekeeping
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REF

Deborah Grey

Reform

Miss Deborah Grey (Edmonton North, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, while our two great allies, Britain and the U.S., are mobilizing warships this Prime Minister is mobilizing cocktail receptions with Iraqi officials. Last week our Prime Minister was actually defending Canadian business invitations to Saddam. He said “If you want to sell you have to have contact first”.

Contact? Who wants contact with a man who gassed thousands of Kurdish dissidents with chemical weapons? What kind of contact with the butcher of Bagdhad would the government find acceptable?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Herb Gray

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (Deputy Prime Minister, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the government finds completely unacceptable the conduct of Saddam Hussein and his regime. We insist that the Iraqi regime allow the UN inspectors back, including those of American origin, to carry out their job pursuant to the UN resolutions without reservation.

In so far as there is any matter of exports to Iraq, the government's position, as is the Prime Minister's position, is that these must meet completely Canadian law and UN resolutions. How can the Reform Party object to that?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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REF

Deborah Grey

Reform

Miss Deborah Grey (Edmonton North, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, the Reform Party objects to that because it completely sends the wrong signal to our allies. That is what we are talking about right now. Any business deal with Iraq, even under the name of so-called non-military business, undermines any allied action.

The UN weapons inspectors must have full access in Iraq and Saddam's bullying must end, but our government is actually helping Saddam's image and harming our allied cause. Again, why on earth is the Prime Minister supporting trade with the likes of Saddam Hussein?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Herb Gray

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (Deputy Prime Minister, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister is not supporting trade. All he said was that our rules and the UN rules have to be respected. I do not see why the Reform Party would oppose that.

Furthermore, if the Reform Party is saying that the UN inspectors must be allowed in, all it is doing is agreeing with what we have already said, and it is about time.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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REF

Deborah Grey

Reform

Miss Deborah Grey (Edmonton North, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, this is unbelievable. In defiance of UN sanctions, Saddam continues to develop chemical and biological weapons, nuclear weapons and missile technology. Yet the government says that it is okay, that it does not have a problem with that.

Our Prime Minister said that these acceptable trade items are okay because they are okay with the UN. Let us talk about trucks and medical supplies. They can be used for military purposes and military personnel as well. Our government knows it; Saddam Hussein knows it.

Is there no dictator too dirty for the government to do business with?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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LIB

Herb Gray

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (Deputy Prime Minister, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member completely misstates the government's position. The government has never said that it supports Iraq's development of biological weapons. It totally rejects that. It stands firm with the other countries of the UN in saying that Iraq must back down and accept UN inspection without reservation.

I say to the hon. member that type of misleading comment, perhaps not intentional, totally weakens the ability of this Parliament to send a strong signal to Saddam Hussein that his misdeeds are unacceptable. It is about time that she supported our position against Saddam Hussein.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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REF

Jack Ramsay

Reform

Mr. Jack Ramsay (Crowfoot, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government desperately wants the Airbus scandal to go away but is unable to sweep it under the rug.

Yesterday former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney accused the government of a high level cover-up. In the face of this very serious accusation, will the Prime Minister stand and state today unequivocally that former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney is lying?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Airbus
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LIB

Herb Gray

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (Deputy Prime Minister, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I have more respect for Parliament and the institution of prime minister than to use the language suggested by the hon. member.

I do want to say that the minutes of settlement signed on behalf of Brian Mulroney say that the parties accept that the RCMP, on its own, initiated the Airbus investigation. The parties have always acknowledged that the RCMP must continue investigating any allegations of illegality or wrongdoing brought to its attention.

This is what Brian Mulroney's lawyers signed for him. These words—

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Airbus
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?

The Speaker

The hon. member for Crowfoot.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Airbus
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REF

Jack Ramsay

Reform

Mr. Jack Ramsay (Crowfoot, Ref.)

Mr. Speaker, everyone from the prime minister to the former justice minister to the commissioner of the RCMP has told Canadians that Staff Sergeant Fiegenwald is the only individual responsible for the Airbus scandal.

Yet they allowed him to walk away without a hearing and without the determination of guilt. I ask the prime minister is this because it forms part of a high level government cover-up?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Airbus
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November 17, 1997