June 14, 1993

NDP

Lorne Edmund Nystrom

New Democratic Party

Hon. Lome Nystrom (Yorkton-Melville):

Madam Speaker, my question is for the Deputy Prime Minister.

First, on behalf of my party I extend our congratulations to the Minister of National Defence for winning the leadership of her party and commend the other candidates for their campaigns.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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?

Some hon. members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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NDP

Lorne Edmund Nystrom

New Democratic Party

Mr. Nystrom:

The Minister of National Defence said on the weekend that she wants to restore confidence among the Canadian people. If we have to restore

confidence, it means that confidence must have been shattered in the past, likely by government policies that have left people in unemployment lines and welfare lines.

Can the Deputy Prime Minister tell us whether or not the government is planning any new directions or new policies to create jobs in Canada or is it just more of the same from the same old government and the same old gang?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Minister of Finance; Vice-President)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, may I say thank you to the hon. member who has expressed best wishes and congratulations on behalf of his party to our new leader and to all the candidates who participated.

The hon. member knows very well that we have gone through a very difficult period, a global recession. Many industrialized countries are deep in a downturn in their economies. As I indicated in the House the other day, the European economies are trying to contract in 1993 and that is the first time in over 30 years.

We have a pretty clear indication that growth is taking hold. We have just seen the composite leading indicator increase by the greatest amount in two years. We have had strong performance in growth in the fourth quarter of 1992. We have had strong performance in growth in the first quarter of 1993.

What is most encouraging is that growth is occurring in the goods-producing sector which is creating jobs, particularly in the manufacturing sector. All of this is given to a large extent by our ability to export more because of improved competitiveness and improved productivity.

The fact that those fundamentals are in place augurs well for the future.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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NDP

Lorne Edmund Nystrom

New Democratic Party

Hon. Lome Nystrom (Yorkton-Melville):

Madam Speaker, government policies like the GST, the free trade deal and NAFTA are what have shaken the confidence of Canadians.

Can the Deputy Prime Minister tell unemployed Canadians today whether there will be any changes in these fundamental policies that have shaken the confidence of Canadians, or can we expect the same old policies that have brought this country to its knees?

June 14, 1993

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Minister of Finance; Vice-President)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, the hon. member talks about the GST.

For the last 20 years his party has been advocating the scrapping of the manufacturers' sales tax and replacing it with a broad base sales tax that would not impair our ability to compete abroad, particularly in the manufacturing and processing sector.

The reason we are experiencing growth and job creation in the processing and manufacturing sector is that we have put those industries on a more competitive playing field. Furthermore, the reason we are doing well on the manufacturing and processing side is that we do have a free trade agreement with the United States. We intend to expand that under a broader North American free trade agreement which will provide a greater and more secure access.

The hon. member comes from an agricultural area. He should be interested in knowing that since the free trade agreement came into effect agrifood exports to the United States have increased by 67 per cent. Why would he want to kill a policy that has provided that kind of support for the agricultural industry?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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HEALTH CARE

NDP

Lorne Edmund Nystrom

New Democratic Party

Hon. Lome Nystrom (Yorkton-Melville):

Madam Speaker, it is the same old policies from the same old gang.

The new leader of the party has talked about change. One change she talked about was the possibility of allowing the provinces to charge user fees in medical care. User fees do not work. We know that.

Can the Deputy Prime Minister assure the House today that the change the government has in mind will not allow the province to impose medical care user fees or deterrent fees which would be nothing more than a tax on the sick?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HEALTH CARE
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PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Minister of Finance; Vice-President)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, I think the new leader has made it very clear she intends to work closely with the provinces in dealing with the deficit and the debt situation and in dealing with the number of challenges we face in bolstering economic growth and in achieving social justice.

Oral Questions

I can assure my hon. friend that kind of consultation and close co-operation will prevail for the betterment of all Canadians.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HEALTH CARE
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YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Mary Clancy (Halifax):

Madam Speaker, last summer in Nova Scotia the unemployment rate for students was 23.8 per cent. The government has cut the budget of SEED by 44 per cent since 1985 and the total jobs created under SEED has dropped by 40,000 over six years.

The new leader speaks of inclusion. My question is for the Deputy Prime Minister. Why has his government failed to include young people in the Tory agenda?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport); Minister of State (Youth); Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport) and Minister of State (Youth) and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

Again, Madam Speaker, as the Deputy Prime Minister says, they were not excluded. They were pretty well included and inclusive at the convention this weekend.

Whenever the opposition refers to the SEED program it isolates the SEED part of the program from the total Challenge program which was redone in 1988 by the then minister in order to deal with the students at risk, the ones who were dropping out of school. The moneys have not been reduced. They have been increased this year alone by $5.1 million.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Mary Clancy (Halifax):

Madam Speaker, talk is cheap. Indeed, some of those fine young people, and they are fine young people, who were at the Tory convention will be back in my office next week still looking for summer jobs.

This government has been promising reforms to the Canada Student Loans Program for two years, but students are still stuck with a 3 per cent tax and the removal of the six-month grace period for repayment. The government speaks of competitiveness and prosperity but does everything possible to hinder such projects.

I ask the minister this: Since this government is clearly doing nothing for students, why not simply call an election and end an illegitimate government?

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport); Minister of State (Youth); Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport) and Minister of State (Youth) and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

Madam Speaker, I would be very surprised if those students who were at the convention end up in the hon. member's office. I am sure that those young students are also looking forward to an election very soon because we will be back in office for a third consecutive majority term and the member will still be sitting there.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

John Harvard

Liberal

Mr. John Harvard (Winnipeg-St. James):

Madam Speaker, I also want to pursue this issue of youth unemployment.

Students need jobs to finance their education but they are finding there is no room for them in this Tory economy. In my home province of Manitoba youth unemployment stands at over 16 per cent. There is no evidence of a turn-around and no hope from a tired old government with no mandate from the people.

My question is this: Why has the government failed students in the west, and in particular Manitoba?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport); Minister of State (Youth); Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport) and Minister of State (Youth) and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

Again, Madam Speaker, this government is working not only for the students of Canada but all Canadians. One of the best ways to make sure that our young people, particularly students, have a chance in the future is to put all the instruments in place so that they can face the challenges they will be facing all their lives, bearing in mind all the changes that are coming about and bearing in mind the situation they will be faced with in the year 2000.

That is exactly what we are doing, and in particular in Manitoba.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

John Harvard

Liberal

Mr. John Harvard (Winnipeg-St. James):

A supplementary, Madam Speaker. A lot of students in my riding are confused over what this government says and does. On the one hand the government talks about the importance of youth employment. On the other hand it has taken millions out of the youth summer employment program. Moreover, universities in Manitoba have suffered serious cutbacks and students have had to pay steep increases in tuition fees.

My question is: Does the government have any plan whatsoever for students or is it just waiting for its own demise?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport); Minister of State (Youth); Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party Deputy House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Pierre H. Cadieux (Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport) and Minister of State (Youth) and Deputy Leader of the Government in the House of Commons):

Madam Speaker, the weekend demonstrated very clearly that we are far from waiting for our demise. On the contrary, I think the hon. member will feel that those benches are very comfortable when we come back after the election.

The money was not cut back. This year alone the budget was increased by $5.1 million. If the students in my hon. friend's riding are confused, perhaps they spend too much time in his office.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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NDP

David Stupich

New Democratic Party

Mr. David D. Stupich (Nanaimo-Cowichan):

Madam Speaker, my question is for the Minister for International Trade.

The announcement of the panel on Friday last about the American import of Canadian live hogs shows, if nothing else, that the Americans are determined not to give open access to Canadian produce but rather to keep fighting every battle until they have won the war.

Does the minister still believe in the dispute settlement mechanism as contrasted to a definition of subsidy?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Michael Holcombe Wilson (Minister for International Trade; Minister of Industry, Science and Technology)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michael Wilson (Minister of Industry, Science and Technology and Minister for International TVade):

Madam Speaker, like the hon. members, we are disappointed in the decision that has been handed down by the panel. I should say to my hon. friend that the circumstances in this particular panel were different from previous panels where we were successful.

We as always have tried to work with the industries involved and with the provinces where they have taken an active part in putting our best foot forward. We will continue to do so in any of these situations that get referred to free trade panels.

June 14, 1993

The simple answer to my hon. friend's question is yes, we have something with the free trade panel system that no other country has today and it has served us very well in this country.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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June 14, 1993