June 10, 1993

PC

Charles A. Langlois (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence; Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Charles A. Langlois (Manicouagan):

Madam Speaker, today the people of Natashquan, on the North Shore, mourn the loss of a pioneer whose dedication and zeal were an inspiration to those around her. Marie Landry-Vigneault, mother of Gilles Vigneault, the famous North Shore poet, died yesterday in Natashquan. She was 101 years old.

She will be remembered as a woman of exceptional talents. A mother of eight children, a teacher and also an occasional author under the pseudonym "La Ma-rieouche", she was widely known and respected by all.

In my capacity as member of Parliament for Manicouagan in the House of Commons, it is a privilege to pay tribute to this remarkable woman whose wisdom and experience are now part of the annals of the North Shore. Today, Quebecers join her son Gilles and her daughter Bernadette in singing that famous song: "Dame Marie, c'est a votre tour, de vous laisser parler d'amour".

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE LATE MARIE LANDRY-VIGNEAULT
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FOREIGN AID

NDP

Daniel James Macdonnell Heap

New Democratic Party

Mr. Dan Heap (Trinity-Spadina):

Madam Speaker, Canada and other developed countries use aid to subsidize domestic industry and promote foreign policy aims, according to a report entitled The Reality of Aid by the Canadian Council for International Co-operation and other non-governmental agencies around the world.

The report particularly criticizes tied aid, which is when donor countries give aid on the condition that it be used to buy goods and services from the donor country.

Canada spends 65 cents of every official development aid dollar in Canada. Tied aid increases costs by limiting competition, stifles the development of indigenous industries and skills and locks the recipient country into dependence upon parts and maintenance that may be expensive and inappropriate.

I call on Canada's government to abolish this kind of phoney aid and instead establish fair and equal trading relations with the countries of the south.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   FOREIGN AID
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CREDIT CARDS

PC

Jean-Pierre Hogue

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jean-Pierre Hogue (Outremont):

Madam Speaker, this week the Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs published its latest quarterly report, this time about credit card costs. In the report, consumers are informed about costs connected with the use of credit cards, to help them choose and use credit cards wisely.

Furthermore, as the summer holiday season approaches, consumers should remember to take additional precautions when using their credit cards. They should always keep them in a safe place. A person's vacation can be ruined if his or her credit cards are stolen. And besides, credit card thefts increase costs for all consumers.

I therefore urge all Canadian consumers to get a copy of this publication from their nearest Consumer and Corporate Affairs office. Don't leave home without it.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CREDIT CARDS
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YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Mary Clancy (Halifax):

Madam Speaker, the YWCA was founded in 1855 in England to assist independent young women in fully developing their intellectual, physical and spiritual strength.

Today the organization is an international movement. The first Canadian branch was opened in an Atlantic Canadian city, Saint John, New Brunswick in 1870, and then in Halifax in 1875.

Just last week at its annual meeting the YWCA elected as its national president, Dale Godsoe, a Haligonian and an outstanding volunteer and community activist in both social and political spheres.

The YWCA was founded on the qualities of strength, usefulness and responsibility, and those values still hold true today. The organization is a valuable place for women of all walks of life to gain leadership skills and life management training to help them meet the needs of an evolving community and society. The YWCA is an excellent advocate for women in this country and around the world.

June 10,1993

I want to send my congratulations to the new president and the YWCA board and ask them to continue their fight for the women of Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
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INTERPROVINCIAL TRADE

PC

Gregory Francis Thompson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Greg Thompson (Carleton-Charlotte):

Madam Speaker, provincial trade ministers met in Vancouver this week to discuss the elimination of trade barriers between the provinces.

It appears that a process has been negotiated which will lead to a dismantling of barriers. This agreement, scheduled to take effect by July 1994, is most welcome and long overdue. Provinces should be commended for recognizing that it is time to tear down the obstacles that hinder growth within the Canadian economy.

According to the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, 95 per cent of its member companies said they received no benefit from internal trade barriers. The elimination of these barriers will go a long way toward strengthening the economies of our provinces and will benefit all Canadians.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   INTERPROVINCIAL TRADE
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UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA HEART INSTITUTE

LIB

Leonard Donald Hopkins

Liberal

Mr. Len Hopkins (Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke):

Madam Speaker, I recently had the great privilege of returning to the House of Commons after demolishing my car in a serious car accident, followed by urgent preventative open heart surgery. The potential heart problem was discovered by Dr. Leach and his wonderful cardiology personnel at the National Defence Medical Centre.

The operation was performed by Dr. Wilbert Keon and his staff at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute at the Ottawa Civic Hospital before a major problem could occur.

When I returned to this House I was taken by storm when all members on both sides of this Chamber rose to give me a very warm welcome back. I extend my very sincere thanks to all members for that excellent dose of

mental therapy. In spite of what many may think this place has its moments of decency, kindness and understanding, and I thank everyone for it.

I pay tribute to Dr. Wilbert Keon to whom many of us owe our lives. This man could have gone off to California, Texas or Boston and written his own financial contract. He chose to stay home and to build a first class heart institute in the nation's capital and at the same time to train other medical personnel. We thousands who owe our lives to him and his colleagues salute him as a great and dedicated Canadian.

At the same time our best from all members of the House goes out to Mr. Speaker, his wife, Kate, and family as he recuperates in Vancouver. We wish him well.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA HEART INSTITUTE
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TONY AWARDS

NDP

Ian Gardiner Waddell

New Democratic Party

Mr. Ian Waddell (Port Moody-Coquitlam):

Madam Speaker, I am particularly pleased to make this statement seeing that you, a former actress, are in the chair. I want to extend the congratulations of the House to my old friend, Brent Carver, who this week received a Tony Award for his role in the Broadway musical Kiss of a Spider Woman.

Brent is from Cranbrook, British Columbia. I first met him in the Arts Club of Vancouver. I want to congratulate also Garth Drabinsky, Live Entertainment of Canada Inc., Des McAnuff on his director's award and Adrea Martin on her best feature actress award.

These people were probably bom talented, but I would remind the House that Brent and the others have been beneficiaries of Canadian government public investment in the arts, in theatre and in films.

In accepting her award Adrea Martin thanked her family, and I quote, "for giving me my roots and my hairdresser, Gary, for restoring them to their natural colour".

We thank them all for their Canadian roots. It was a great week for Canadian talent in New York.

June 10, 1993

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TONY AWARDS
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT

LIB

Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Chretien (Leader of the Opposition):

Madam Speaker, I have a question for the Deputy Prime Minister.

Yesterday President Clinton said that NAFTA was in trouble in Congress and that the talks on side deals were at a complete impasse.

When the government forced the vote in the House of Commons last month telling us there was no problem with the deal, was it because the Conservative government was incompetent to forecast what was happening or was it because the Conservative government was trying to mislead Canadian people?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
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PC

Michael Holcombe Wilson (Minister for International Trade; Minister of Industry, Science and Technology)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michael Wilson (Minister of Industry, Science and Technology and Minister for International IVade):

Madam Speaker, I guess we are going to have the same sort of twisting of things by members opposite, but let me make it quite clear that what we have legislated is simply to prepare ourselves for a NAFTA by the implementing legislation that results in changes to 23 different statutes if the other countries do the same.

If the other countries do not implement their NAFTA legislation then the terms of the legislation says that the legislation we passed in the House the other day will not go into force. We are simply preparing for the agreement when it comes and we are confident it will come in spite of the comments of my friend opposite. We want to put our business people in a position where they can plan to take advantage of the opportunities that are there and ensure they will be there.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
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LIB

Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Chretien (Leader of the Opposition):

Madam Speaker, that is really funny. The minister has good intentions; he would like businessmen to be able to plan in Canada. But yesterday again, the U.S. government came up with a third proposal, this time on import surges. The U.S. government is proposing a third subject for a parallel accord.

Why does the Canadian government not want to do as the Americans now, namely move the issue forward and hold discussions immediately to get a clear definition of

Oral Questions

subsidy and of dumping, so that businessmen can plan and not be caught in the situation which the steel industry finds itself in now?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
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PC

Michael Holcombe Wilson (Minister for International Trade; Minister of Industry, Science and Technology)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michael Wilson (Minister of Industry, Science and Technology and Minister for International TFade):

Madam Speaker, I do not know where my friend has been. There is nothing new about the proposal on import surges. That was signalled by the U.S. president when he was running for president back in October 1992. There is nothing new in this.

My hon. says: "Let us clarify matters with relation to subsidies". That is precisely what we are doing during the Uruguay round negotiations. I am sure he would be very pleased to see that those negotiations have progressed significantly with the meeting I chaired in Toronto about a month ago and then the subsequent meeting in Paris last week that I attended with my counterparts in other countries. We will be continuing this process later this month in Tokyo.

We will be able to get a very solid response to the concerns he has expressed about subsidies which we share. We have agreed with the United States that we would pursue this through the Uruguay round.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
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LIB

Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. Jean Chretien (Leader of the Opposition):

Madam Speaker, if they are concerned about subsidies and dumping why have they not taken the initiative to have the definition incorporated into the NAFTA? Why wait for the other proposition that might never come to fruition?

Yesterday I met with the steel industry. It is very competitive but it had the surprise of its life. The Canadian board under the authority of this government is permitting producers of steel from abroad to dump it in the Canadian economy. The board says that there is no injury, but it does not take a genius to understand that if we let people dump in our market eventually the dumping price will reduce the price producers are receiving in Canada. When will this government do something about it?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
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June 10, 1993