May 31, 1993

PC

Monique Bernatchez Tardif (Parliamentary Secretary to the Solicitor General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Tardif:

Mr. Speaker, I would like to tell my hon. colleague that, earlier in the debate, we discussed at length the initiatives taken by the government, including the centres for excellence and the Canada Scholarship Program, which was originally targeted at students graduating from colleges and which now provides scholarships to high school graduates who are entering the field of techniques of the future or faculties which will enable us to create jobs, thanks to the new technologies.

I believe that this government has recognized that it was extremely important to prepare the future and to try to direct young people in fields such as engineering and the new sciences.

This is one aspect. It is for young successful people. It is extremely important because this is where jobs will be created. As I was saying earlier, the fact that one-third of high school students drop out is very costly, first for those young people, in terms of salary in future years, and also for Canadian taxpayers, in terms of the support which they will have to provide to those who will not have gone to school long enough to get the better jobs. If we look at what is going on in our society, we find that there is a large number of available positions for which Canadians are not qualified.

We must first develop the knowledge and skills and the will to learn in our young people, so that they can get the jobs. We must urge our good students to persevere, and we must ensure, as adults and as a government, that we recognize the importance of succeeding and having this quest for excellence, which may guarantee that tomorrow we will all be better off in an economic activity which will enable Canadians to live even better, and which will provide a job for every one of them.

May 31, 1993

[English \

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Ronald MacDonald

Liberal

Mr. Ron MacDonald (Dartmouth):

Mr. Speaker, I rose a little earlier in the debate today to compliment my colleague from North York who saw fit to bring this motion to the floor of the House today.

As was indicated by another one of my colleagues, this is the second time the Liberal Party has put a motion dealing with this government's lack of any idea of what to do about the unemployment problem and in particular the plight of unemployed youth in Canada. We only get so many allotted days to decide what the subject matter that is debated on the floor of this House will be.

Truly the situation in Canada today is extremely tragic. Most would say this is one of the most blessed countries in the world from the perspective of its geography, natural beauty and abundance of natural resources. We are probably unequalled anywhere in the world.

We look at the world and the global markets evolving and say that Canada should be poised to take advantage of this expansion in world markets. We should have a skilled and ready labour force that will be able to take advantage of the emerging opportunities in both the North American and global contexts.

After nine years of Conservative government we have seen the greatness of Canada almost frittered away. Whole classes of people, based on where they live in the regions, have literally been cut adrift.

We have seen this government pursue policies that are insane. We have watched as the Tories decided to battle inflation but had no strategy for growth. They determined up front that an acceptable price to pay for lower inflation was a system ically high unemployment rate. That is what they have done.

In the five years since I was elected to this place they have continued their scorched earth policy when it comes to the regions of this country, the dispossessed and the unemployed.

The only thing they have done for the unemployed since they were re-elected by a fluke in 1988 was add many to their numbers so at least they would not be lonely. They did the same thing to food bank lines as well. Rather than solving the problem of the increasing growth of the poor and dispossessed in Canadian society and rather than dealing with the fundamental problems

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that were causing that, all they did was to add to their numbers. I guess, according to the Tories, misery loves company.

We had the spectacle only a week ago of the member from Don Valley who had a staff member show up at a food bank so that she could just show that anybody, even if they did not need to, could go in and get food at a food bank. She was trying to convey some perverse idea that food banks were unnecessary or were being abused. That is absolutely insane.

Can one just imagine it? Rather than tackling the problem of unemployment this government has constantly attacked the the unemployed budget after budget after budget. That is what it has done.

In the last year when Canadians were facing despair in record numbers because of Tory economic policies, we did not see it come back after the referendum and say: "We have listened to Canadians. They are fed up with the way that we govern. They are not prepared to support any initiative on the Constitution no matter how worthy because Canadians are fed up because we are not dealing with the fundamental issues for Canadians and they are economic issues".

It did not come back in with a public works program like the Japanese and the Europeans have to give people back their dignity and to make them taxpayers instead of tax takers. It did not do that. It came in and passed a bill and rammed it through with their majority. It was not to solve the problem of unemployment but to make those poor, unemployed Canadians whose numbers are increasing more miserable while they were getting their unemployment insurance. It cut back on the amount of money that one could get and increased the length of time one had to work to get it. It decreased the length of time that one could get it. Rather than deal with the fundamental Tory problems that have caused an economic collapse across this country it attacked the unemployed.

I listened to some of the ministers opposite here in their feeble attempt in their dying days as a government. Canadians will not forget the turmoil that this bunch opposite have put them through over the last nine years. There are over 2 million people who are on unemployment insurance or on welfare or lined up at food banks.

May 31, 1993

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There are 500,000 children who live in poverty. The record will not be forgotten.

Ministers opposite in this debate today get up and say: "I will tell you how much money we spent on this program and how much we spent on that. We have training dollars going here". I hate to tell those ministers but whatever they have done has not been enough. Whatever they have done has not contributed to alleviating the problem. It has contributed to making the problem worse.

We talk about programs for the youth of this country. My goodness, anybody that knows history knows that a country that has not invested in the youth of its nation does not have a future. It is as simple as that. In these very quickly changing times with the emerging global markets any nation that is not investing a substantial amount of resources into training its young people, putting it into the university system, putting it into apprenticeship training programs and putting it into that whole host of first-time job opportunities for our youth is a nation that does not have a future.

Yet the Tory bunch opposite is insistent every time it gets up in the House to tell people that they have never had it so good. I have the dubious distinction in the opposition of being the critic for bankruptcies of all things. At least one thing that I know is that I will be on the national news once a month when I have to get up and comment on yet another record month of bankruptcies in this country.

In 1992 this government presided over the largest number of personal and business bankruptcies in the history of the country. Yet each and every time opposition members get up and question the government's policies that have caused this, the ministers on the front bench, or God forbid the Prime Minister himself, pop up and say: "Things are going to get better. If we just pursue these policies we will have some equality across the country". It is not going to be equality of opportunity. It will be equality of despair from coast to coast to coast in this country.

Today in the dying days of this Parliament we are debating a motion that condemns the government on

behalf of the millions of individuals who have been forced into despair because of its policies.

Tike a province like Nova Scotia. I do not care what the bunch opposite says. Down in Cape Breton Island one finds that the Statistics Canada unemployment rate is at 28.5 per cent. I am a Cape Bretoner and we are a pretty strong and proud people but after nine years of having the Tory government dish out its brand of economic renewal it has damned near broken the spirit of Cape Bretoners.

There will be hope for people in Cape Breton, Montreal, the north and my riding of Dartmouth because in a very few weeks-not months-the people of Canada will have an opportunity to pass judgment on this government's job creation effort and opportunities for the unemployed and for the young people of this country.

There is no question in my mind that the people of Canada when given the opportunity will judge the federal Tory party the way we have recently-last Tuesday-judged the provincial Tory party in Nova Scotia. We will kick butt and there will not be very many Tories left nationally. In the province of Nova Scotia the Donald Cameron record of Toryism was patterned after the Brian Mulroney brand of Toryism. I think there are 7 or 8 of them left out of 52 and those guys got in by the skin of their teeth.

There is hope for Canadians. Hope is around the corner. It is called the federal election. The Liberal Party will put forward a prescription for renewed optimism for the people of Canada. It will be a prescription based on people first. It is a prescription the Tories opposite simply do not understand.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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?

Hon. Chas. L. Caccia@Davenport

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask my colleague, the member for Dartmouth who has made such an impressive and convincing intervention, whether he would care to comment for a moment about the jobs strategy which we have seen evolving in the last two years in this country. I wonder whether the jobs strategy is on target with the changing requirements of employers and whether the jobs strategy takes into account the changes for Canada in terms of the production of goods and services which would be exported. In other words, is the jobs strategy one that he would subscribe to or would he conclude, as I unfortu-

May 31, 1993

nately have to conclude, that it has been an abysmal failure?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Ronald MacDonald

Liberal

Mr. MacDonald (Dartmouth):

Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Davenport for asking that particular question. Here is what we have seen most recently in the budget. The government came in and mismanaged the economy into a record series of deficits. We had the Minister of Finance only last year indicate that the federal deficit would be in the order of about $28 billion for this current fiscal year. He is off by a little bit. He is only off by $8 billion. He says: "Trust me in all the other figures I am going to give about all the jobs we will create if you allow us to come back in again to give you another dose of Tory economics".

Quite clearly the budget that we saw was a strategy for cutting. When one does not know what else to do then one just cuts indiscriminately. There was nothing there. I say to my colleague from Davenport that it was clear in the last budget that this government has no strategy for growth, none at all. There was nothing in the budget for the unemployed. Indeed the economic policies we have seen over the last number of years had contributed and are probably solely responsible for the high level of unemployment in every age group and in every sector.

We have had the government tell us in 1988 that free trade was going to be a bonanza and that we would see expansion in markets and in employment opportunities unlike anything we had seen before. The member is from Ontario and knows full well that as a result of this government's free trade initiative, this crazy deal that it entered into with the Americans, there have been hundreds of thousands of jobs lost in the manufacturing sector in Ontario alone.

Quite clearly if I have to comment about this government's strategy for creation of jobs and growth, it simply does not have one. The only strategy it has is a strategy to try to hold on to the power. That one has proven bankrupt or will prove bankrupt as soon as the election is called.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Joseph R. (Joe) Comuzzi

Liberal

Mr. Joe Comuzzi (Thunder Bay-Nipigon):

Mr. Speaker, I have just a short question because I know our time is limited.

My colleague was in the House when I asked the previous speaker a question about skills development

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and the absence in our educational system of training for our young people in skills development.

My colleague is involved and very knowledgeable in that area. I would like him to comment on the process in the last 10 years of not training our young people with the skills to acquire the jobs that are needed and thereby correct the problem, of not taking the initiative to bring that forward.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Ronald MacDonald

Liberal

Mr. MacDonald (Dartmouth):

Mr. Speaker, clearly one of the problems we have had is that the federal government continuously passes the buck on its own responsibilities. As a national government the federal Government of Canada through the Parliament of Canada has the responsibility to look after things like labour market development. As a result it has a responsibility to come in with programs which are cost-shared and administered by the provinces to ensure that Canada has a strategy to face the changing labour market and, most of all, that there is a national plan co-ordinated by the federal government.

I heard on the floor of the House today some Conservatives who agree with the Liberal strategy for having a national apprenticeship training program. They say they agree with the principle but it will never happen because we simply cannot get the provinces to agree. One of the problems we have is not whether the provinces agree. It is not whether there is a need. It is whether this government has the moral authority, legitimacy or credibility with provincial governments to put any national program in place.

Clearly after nine years of despair, nine years of cutbacks in transfers to the provinces for things like post-secondary education, the provinces will not play ball with the government. In Nova Scotia alone in 1992 we saw the federal government, the one that says it is so interested in youth, in training and in preparing our youth for the jobs that will be available now and in the future, renege on its constitutional requirement to ensure similar levels of post-secondary education are available across the country.

In 1992 in my own province of Nova Scotia $46 million was cut from the transfers to the Established Programs Financing for post-secondary education. Clearly that makes sure that in Nova Scotia like the rest of the country tuitions have gone through the roof. At the same point in time as there is more student unemployment, 24 per cent student unemployment in Nova Scotia, it has cut back on grants to the provinces for post-secondary

May 31, 1993

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education which has increased tuition. Under this Tory administration for a number of years we are now seeing post-secondary education being-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Charles Deblois (Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

The Acting Speaker (Mr. DeBlois):

I am sorry, but the time for questions and comments has now expired.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Mary Clancy (Halifax):

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to follow my colleague, the hon. member for Dartmouth. I can assure the House that we are two minds but with a single thought on this issue.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Joseph R. (Joe) Comuzzi

Liberal

Mr. Comuzzi:

Three minds.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Clancy:

Yes, three minds including the hon. member for Thunder Bay-Nipigon, three minds with a single thought. That is the last bit of levity that I expect to inject into this debate. This is not a matter for levity. It is not a matter for joking. It is not a matter to smile about. It is a matter, in the words of my colleague, the hon. member for North York, that we can only call a tragedy. He calls it the tragedy of unemployment, especially among the young and particularly with regard to education, job training and retraining.

I live in Halifax. I live one block from Dalhousie University. I live four blocks from Saint Maiy's University, four blocks from Queen Elizabeth High School, four blocks from the Vocational School Halifax, four blocks from St. Patrick's High School, two blocks from Sacred Heart School, and six blocks from Halifax Grammar School. Every day hundreds of young people pass by my office door, my house door. Every day I see young people who no longer have hope.

Twenty-five years ago when I was in university we had hope. We had to work hard and we had to scrape and save, although we had a better student loan program in those days, better access to summer jobs and better bursaries in the provinces. We had to work hard but we had hope.

I remember in the early seventies facing graduation not for an instant thinking that there would not be a job. Of course there would be a job. We were the sixties generation. We were the best educated, the most aware, the most ready generation that this country had ever

seen. We came out, we got jobs and we did well. Some of us even ended up in Parliament.

However, what have we collectively as a Parliament been able to do for the people that have come after us, for this next generation, for those kids born in the seventies and coming into the work force in the nineties?

We have disappointed them and we have betrayed them because this is Canada. It is a country of magnificent opportunity. It is a country of incredible resource. It is a country that should be able to support not just the population that we have, a scant 28 million over the immense and fabulous land mass that is this country, but 10 times that number, if we had a government that planned for the future, that anticipated to some degree the way the world was going to develop and if it took seriously-and I hesitate to use the words because they have become base coin-the sacred trust that we all should hold to ensure that the children of this country can wake up in the morning with hope in their hearts. That does not happen, not in this country, not today.

At 9.30 this morning I was on Spring Garden Road, one of the major thoroughfares in Halifax. I had come out of a meeting and in front of one of the shopping centres there must have been 25 young people, all of them I would say between the ages of 18 and 22.1 do not know whether they were recent high school graduates or university students. I do not know what their specific situation was, but I do know generally at 9.30 on a Monday morning if one has a job one is at work. This crowd of young people did not have jobs and were not at work and indeed had probably come from the student employment office where they had again been told there was nothing available, nothing for them.

If they happen to be students who hope to go back to university in the fall they are being faced with incredible rises in tuition because of the cutbacks in established programs funding that have eviscerated the maritime universities and universities across the country.

If they are young people who have finished their education or think they have finished their education, they are learning tragically that education has not prepared them to be productive members of this new and changing society.

May 31, 1993

It is absolutely unfathomable to me that this government which has been in power for nine long arduous years has not in the nine long arduous years come up with a response because it had already started in 1984. It had well started in 1984.

We, the previous government, indeed the previous minister of employment, the member for Winnipeg South Centre, had a most ambitious training program he was bringing forward. It was a skills training program. What has happened to it? Gone. Cut. Not there any more.

This country of ours, one of the most amazing countries in the world, is the least served by its work force in highly skilled training. We do not have it. We have the people, but no one has trained them in any numbers to do the jobs that are available.

I can remember sitting in this House-I do not remember how many years ago, I know my colleague from Dartmouth remembers it too-when the fish plant in Shelburne was closing and the fish plant in Canso was closing. I remember being told by the then Minister of Employment and Immigration that retraining was going to take care of it all. We laughed, not because it was amusing but because it was tragic. We laughed.

We are not laughing today, because the tragedy that we were laughing at that day has come to pass. There has been no retraining in Shelburne county. There has been no retraining in Canso. Why retrain people if there are no jobs? Why not create the jobs and do the training? The government does not do that.

What do we have in Atlantic Canada? We have supercomputers in Cape Breton. Supercomputers. Terrific. Just what we need. We have an industrial policy, a non-existent industrial policy I should say, in a province that has always been a proud province. It is a province that has had a work force second to none. It is a province where its men and women would take on any job, any time, to ensure they could feed their families, pay their mortgages and be productive members of society.

Now those people who have worked hard all their lives are seeing their children, young men and young women, on the unemployment lines. These people are not statistics. They are human beings. Every one of us goes

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back to our ridings. We see these young people desperate for work, desperate for hope, desperate for any kind of encouragement that will tell them life will get better. Maybe it will not be next week or next month, but surely next year, surely in six months, surely some time. However it is not and this government is not giving them any reason to think any better of it.

That is why I say this motion brought forward by the member for North York deserves support. Government members opposite should pick up this motion, wave it in front of their cabinet colleagues and say: "If we do nothing else before we leave this place"-most of them never to return-"we should do something for the young people of Canada".

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Ronald MacDonald

Liberal

Mr. Ron MacDonald (Dartmouth):

Mr. Speaker, my colleague from Halifax, coming from a province which has for far too long suffered disproportionately the downturns in the economy, knows what happens to people, particularly young people, who do not have the opportunity to grow and gain self-confidence and some integrity through employment.

In her riding of Halifax there is a place called Hope Cottage. Individuals who are down on their luck, who are living on the street, who do not have a job, who have basically no hope left through circumstances which most times are beyond their control go there to at least get a hot meal from somebody who does not question why they are there.

One of the things in Halifax-Dartmouth that concerns me is that when I pass by Hope Cottage there are more and more people lined up. I go down to the churches in Dartmouth. I see Reverend Chang and I find out that they cannot keep up with the numbers of people who come, people looking at their shoes because they have lost their dignity, looking for just enough food to feed their families.

As an individual who has been active and has been the social conscience in many cases of segments of Halifax society, I want to ask her what has happened in a place like Halifax, the centre, the economic hub of Atlantic Canada, because of this government's economic policies. What has happened as far as the increasing numbers of people lined up at food banks as a result of those policies?

May 31, 1993

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Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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LIB

Mary Catherine Clancy

Liberal

Ms. Clancy:

Mr. Speaker, I thank my hon. colleague from Dartmouth for the question.

Hope Cottage is two blocks from my riding office. I am very familiar with it. I too have noticed not only longer lines at Hope Cottage and longer lines at the food banks in the Halifax and Dartmouth area but younger people going there as well.

It used to be that the people who took advantage of Hope Cottage, the soup kitchen at St. Mary's Basilica and the services of Reverend Chang in Dartmouth were a segment of society which through no fault of its own, but for a variety of reasons had an inability to survive without these particular social services.

That group has been augmented by young, able-bodied men who try every morning at the unemployment office, at every possible outlet in the city of Halifax, in the city of Dartmouth, in the county of Halifax to find gainful employment. I know this because I have frequently called upon the services of young men to shovel snow or to clean my basement or my attic or something like that. I know how desperately they are looking for employment that just is not there.

They are not people who do not want a job. These are not people who would like to live what some bizarre and unusual people think is the life of Riley on social assistance. Tiiese are people who know, as every one of us in this House knows, that the greatest social service we can give anyone is the dignity of a job. However the dignity of a job is something that is lacking for too large a number of young people in my city, in my province and, God help us, in my country.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Gregory Francis Thompson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Greg Thompson (Carleton - Charlotte):

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to this important debate. We are addressing and debating a very important issue when we speak of the youth of this country and some of the difficulties they face.

I do not think that we can isolate the situation of the youth in this country from the mainstream of the economy. I will point to some of the programs we have in existence now to address some of those problems specifically. What is lacking in the debate from the other side of the House is focusing on the wider picture and putting in context that greater economy all Canadians share. That is where the answer really lies.

The fact is that the Canadian economy is not in nearly as bad shape as the opposition likes to pretend. It is not as good as I would like to see it, or as good as you would like to see it, Mr. Speaker, but we are making progress. I want to emphasize some of the progress that we are making.

What I want to point out, as the member for Halifax did deal with the unemployment statistics and some of the numbers that she is seeing in her native province of Nova Scotia, is that as the Canadian economy continues to grow and as more Canadians are going back to work it does have a residual effect upon the prospects of those younger Canadians, including students, who are seeking work.

I will provide some of the statistics that give me pleasure and encouragement. When we mention those statistics we have to measure where we are in relation to where the opposition was back in 1981 when it was the government.

Today in Canada we have an inflation rate of less than 2 per cent. In fact it is 1.8 per cent. We have prime interest rates of less than 6 per cent and we have unemployment in my home province of New Brunswick of 11 per cent.

Compare that to 1981 when we had inflation at 12 per cent, interest at 22 per cent and unemployment over 17 per cent in my home province. There is no comparison. What it really means is that we have more jobs back home now, including in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. That is helping the youth.

No matter what city one is in or what street one is on one is always going to see unemployment. It is always going to be too much. However the economy is moving along well. The Canadian economy is positioned to out-perform all economies in the western world this year. It has so far.

That is good and it is good for our youth. Specifically some of the programs that we have for our youth would give them some cause for hope as well. For example we invested $3.8 billion in 1993 in training and adjustment packages for workers. That has an effect on young workers as well. It has a big impact on young workers.

May 31. 1993

We are going to be spending $250 million in the next live years to create skills councils. This year specifically l'or students our Challenge program will be budgeted to the tune of $110 million. It will be $110 million for youth in each and every one of the regions of Canada.

A common theme throughout the debate on the opposition side today is to simply ignore many of these figures. They ignore some of the things that we are doing. I think it has to be put on the record.

For example in 1993 we are going to be spending $2.21 billion to upgrade the skills of workers. The interesting thing to note is that it totally contradicts what the opposition is debating today. Those members voted against that in Bill C-21.

They fought and raged against Bill C-21. What they are really doing is fighting and waging war against the very program that is providing over $2 billion in training funds for our youth. Another statistic which is worth mentioning is the $296 million that we announced in February 1990 in what we call our stay-in-school initiative. There is $296 million.

The province of New Brunswick has used those funds rather well. We have a significant decrease in the drop-out rate in New Brunswick because of that program. It is a federal program. Many of the provinces bought into it and have had very good success with it.

One of the things that always amazes me about the opposition is its lack of a sense of history. The EPF, Established Programs Financing, payments go back to the provinces to help them provide for higher education. I remind the opposition that it was in 1977 when those members allowed and voted for the bill that would allow EPF payments to be used for something other than education.

That was wrong back then. When those moneys, which are given through the generosity of the Canadian taxpayer through the federal government, go back to the provinces some of the provinces are not using those funds for what they were intended.

The member for Dartmouth was not here in 1977 so I cannot blame him. However his party stood up here as the government at the time and allowed the provinces to

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do that. I think when it is examining its position in relation to what is happening out there today it has to take a very close look at the history of this country and what it did.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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PC

Charles Deblois (Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

The Acting Speaker (Mr. DeBlois):

Order, please. I am sorry but it being six o'clock p.m. it is my duty to inform the House that pursuant to Standing Order 81(17), proceedings on the motion have expired.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
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ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-WATER


The House resumed, from Friday, May 28, consideration of the motion of Mr. Gardiner: That this House condemn the government for its failure to protect Canadian interests regarding the inter-basin transfer of water as exemplified by the Kemano project, the North Thompson River, and both the Columbia River Treaty and the North American free trade agreement.


PC

Charles Deblois (Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

The Acting Speaker (Mr. DeBlois):

Pursuant to Standing Order 45(6), the House will now proceed to the deferred division on the motion of Mr. Gardiner, on the supply proceedings.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   ALLOTTED DAY, S. O. 81-WATER
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Call in the members.


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May 31, 1993