May 14, 1993

GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES

PC

John Williston (Bud) Bird

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. W. Bud Bird (Fredericton-York-Sunbury):

Madam Speaker, when this government introduced Bill C-56, the Spending Control Act, last year it set an absolute limit on program spending by law.

It is encouraging that actual spending has been more then $1 billion below that limit in the first year and is estimated to average almost $2 billion annually below the limits in the ensuing four years.

As a result the government has reduced the legal control limits accordingly and the legislation will be extended by an additional two years. The major contributing cause of present deficits has been undisciplined spending, especially in good economic times by our Liberal governments for the 15 years before 1984.

Government action to control spending by law is unprecedented in Canada. Thus it is imperative that the Spending Control Act remain in place indefinitely, certainly until a balanced budget has been achieved and we have commenced to reduce the national debt.

For years to come, perhaps decades, a strong conservative approach to public finance must remain a hallmark of government administration in Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES
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MINISTER OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

LIB

Marlene Catterall

Liberal

Mrs. Marlene Catterall (Ottawa West):

Madam Speaker, if we ever doubted the Tories, a Tory is a Tory.

The Minister of National Defence last night put herself squarely in the Mulroney mould by lashing out at those who disagree with her and calling them enemies of Canadians. I want to tell madam high and mighty minister that the 1.5 million Canadians who are out of work and out of hope because of her government's policies are not the enemies of Canadians.

The millions of seniors who have been politically and economically abused by her government are not the enemies of Canadians. Those seeking equality who have had their voices stifled and their right to challenge and

May 14, 1993

justice suppressed by her government are not the enemies of Canada.

Those who believe that health care is for the sick and not just for the wealthy are not the enemies of Canadians. Those who believe in a Canada for all Canadians and a future for our young people, an economic prosperity that benefits the many and not just the privileged, we are not the enemies of Canada.

The current Prime Minister learned at his peril that Canadians will not stand being bullied and branded as traitors for disagreeing with him-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MINISTER OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
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PC

Andrée Champagne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Madam Deputy Speaker:

The member's time has expired.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MINISTER OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
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CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

PC

Gregory Francis Thompson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Greg Thompson (Carleton -Charlotte):

Madam Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Justice introduced legislation in the House to deal with child pornography.

Under the bill possession of child pornography would be a crime punishable by up to five years in prison. Distribution of child pornography would be punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

The legislation contains many of the measures suggested by three federally commissioned studies dating back to 1984. It is necessary legislation and, quoting the minister, "the message is that child pornography should not be tolerated in this country".

I am confident that the bill will be supported by all members of the House.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CHILD PORNOGRAPHY
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FOREIGN AID

NDP

Ross Harvey

New Democratic Party

Mr. Ross Harvey (Edmonton East):

Madam Speaker, yesterday in a keynote speech to the African Development Bank a U.S. representative announced that President Clinton was ready to help relieve Africa's poorest nations of their "crushing debt burdens" by writing off half their U.S. owed debt.

Two weeks ago Oxfam International opened a campaign to bring a kind of Marshall plan to Africa. The plan would stop the present slide of sub-Sarahan Africa that will drive half of the continent's 600 million people below the poverty line by the end of the decade and

doom the many precarious democratic movements that have brought real hope to that region.

How has the Canadian government responded to the grinding poverty in Africa? As a result of the latest round of cuts, aid levels as a percentage of GNP are projected to fall to .39 per cent by next year, back to the levels of the early 1970s. Virtually all bilateral aid to seven sub-Sarahan African countries is being cut, and all but one of these nations is on the list of the 20 poorest countries in the world.

Meanwhile during his recent trip the Prime Minister offered Russians another $162 million in assistance. Canada is already the second most generous contributor to Russia in per capita terms-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   FOREIGN AID
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PC

Andrée Champagne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Madam Deputy Speaker:

The member's time has expired.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   FOREIGN AID
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JUSTICE

LIB

Dennis Joseph Mills

Liberal

Mr. Dennis Mills (Broadview-Greenwood):

Madam Speaker, on behalf of Women of Courage, the coalition of women survivors of violence and their supporters, I call upon the Prime Minister to explain the imprisonment of a mother for trying to protect her child.

The mother, a resident of the Prime Minister's home town of Baie Comeau, Quebec, was resentenced to two more years in jail for refusing to allow her three and a half year old daughter to see her father alone. The mother gives a graphic account of the father's sexual and physical abuse of the child.

I call upon the Prime Minister to direct the Minister of Justice to look into this situation immediately and take the necessary action to alleviate the suffering of this mother and child.

We must reform the Canadian Criminal Code and family law code to provide more flexibility to deal with instances such as this one.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   JUSTICE
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FOOD AND DRUG REGULATIONS

PC

Murray Dorin

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Murray W. Dorin (Edmonton Northwest):

Madam Speaker, recently I have received many letters and phone calls from my constituents who are concerned about proposed amendments to the food and drug

May 14, 1993

regulations dealing with herbs and botanical preparations.

Since there has been increased use by Canadians of herbs and botanical preparations, the Department of National Health and Welfare Health protection branch is concerned that some herbs and botanical preparations with potentially harmful properties could be marketed to the public.

While the proposed amendments will establish cautionary labelling requirements for some substances, it is important to note that many preparations have no history of causing adverse effects on the general population.

Since 1989 the Department of National Health and Welfare has undergone an extensive consultation process on the issue. While it is a necessary function of the department to ensure protection of the public, it is important for officials to recognize that the proposed amendments will have a major impact on the sector.

I urge the department to listen to the concerns of those involved and use caution in banning or unnecessarily restricting products which have long been used as herbal remedies.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   FOOD AND DRUG REGULATIONS
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SECOND LANGUAGE TRAINING

LIB

Mac Harb

Liberal

Mr. Mac Harb (Ottawa Centre):

Madam Speaker, a report by the Canada Employment and Immigration advisory council entitled Immigrants and Language Training states:

The lack of a national standard is the single most important shortcoming directly affecting the quality of immigrant language training services and affects the efficiency with which the millions of taxpayers' dollars are expended on immigrant language training.

We agree. Second language training policies of this government discriminate against the youth of Canada. For example, a 17-year old youth immigrant who requires second language training is not eligible to receive language training under present government policies.

This week I met with representatives of over 15 different organizations and school-boards to express our concerns over this and other issues relating to language training. I join with these organizations in calling on the government to immediately establish a joint federalprovincial committee to ensure that national standards for immigrant language training are in place and to eliminate any discrimination against the youth of Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SECOND LANGUAGE TRAINING
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PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PC

Harry Chadwick

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Harry Chadwick (Bramalea-Gore-Malton):

Madam Speaker, a new high school was recently built in my riding under the existing north-south flight path at Pearson International Airport.

In order to get final permission to build this school the government dictated that over $50,000 must be added to the cost in order to protect the occupants from the noise of those so-called quiet aeroplanes. Now the government has decided to build three new runways over existing schools and homes in my riding.

Can the government ensure my constituents that there will be no double standard here? Will the government give assurances to my residents that the same standard for noise reduction will be applied to the many existing schools and homes in our community? If so, is the government prepared to pay for it or will the local taxpayer once again be called upon to pay for the down side of an airport that benefits all Canadians?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PEARSON INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
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WESTERN GRAIN TRANSPORTATION ACT

PC

Kenneth David Atkinson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ken Atkinson (St. Catharines):

Madam Speaker, the government's response to the transport committee's report on the St. Lawrence Seaway stated again that the reform of the Western Grain Transportation Act was being pursued.

Grain markets have shifted to the far east to a certain extent, but it is my opinion that the WGTA creates a certain directional bias in favour of the west coast in the transportation of grain. Reform of the WGTA should help solve this problem, but it appears it will take a number of years to occur. In the meantime ship owners and the seaway are suffering. Their very existence is at stake.

I would again call on the government to provide interim relief to the ship owners and the seaway until the reform of the WGTA is completed. If this is not done there will be no infrastructure or ships to move grain in

May 14, 1993

Oral Questions

an easterly direction when the directional bias is eliminated and the seaway is required.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   WESTERN GRAIN TRANSPORTATION ACT
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May 14, 1993