May 5, 1993

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31

PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY

LIB

David Walker

Liberal

Mr. David Walker (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, last week there was an ugly incident at the Tory leadership debate in Calgary which probably more than anything else shows how shallow the claim of politics of inclusion really is for that party.

Despite having paid admission Vickie Crowchild-Ab-erdeen, a native woman and a former Conservative member, was not only denied admission to the forum but was pushed up against the wall by PC security.

Tony Hall, a professor at the University of Lethbridge, was also refused entry. He was protesting the omission of aboriginal rights in NAFTA.

Yesterday MPs from all parties heard the chief of the Assembly of First Nations, Ovide Mercredi, testify before a committee that aboriginals "only know the politics of exclusion" and what is needed is "real access to the decision-making process of government".

What does this incident tell us? Perhaps the editorial board of The Edmonton Journal is correct in saying today: "Sometimes it looks as if the Conservatives are determined to lose the coming election".

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY
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STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

PC

Wilton (Willie) Littlechild

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Willie Littlechild (Wetaskiwin):

Mr. Speaker, May 7 will mark the nation-wide launch of the Hire a Student-Business Drive for Jobs campaign at a regional event site in each region of the country with the national kick-off ceremony taking place in Quebec City.

Employers and home owners almost anywhere in the country can call one of 400 student employment centres and ask for help in filling just about any kind of student employment opening. This student placement service of Employment and Immigration Canada is now celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Through the Business Drive for Jobs campaign four major business organizations have pledged to encourage their members to hire students. These business organizations are the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, the Retail Council of Canada and le Conseil du patronat du Quebec. As a result, many businesses will strike up a partnership with one of our student employment centres this summer.

Our next generation of workers is knocking on the door and I urge every employer to assist it.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
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DUMPING

LIB

Alfonso Gagliano (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Alfonso Gagliano (Saint-Leonard):

Mr. Speaker, in an effort to prove American companies are guilty of dumping Canadian companies must initiate lengthy and costly procedures, which is totally unacceptable.

Claude Jutras, executive vice-president of the Association des fabricants de meubles du Quebec, suspects an American company of dumping its products on the Canadian market which constitutes an unlawful trading practice. Mr. Jutras feels it is unacceptable that the Canadian government does nothing to defend our interests. Mr. Jutras would have to spend $500,000 on preparing his case. In the United States, the mere presumption of dumping gets a reaction from Washington.

I think the government should drop its policy of not intervening and start helping Canadian companies defend themselves against unlawful trading.

May 5, 1993

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   DUMPING
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PREMIER OF QUEBEC

PC

Guy St-Julien

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Guy Saint-Julien (Abitibi):

Mr. Speaker, I think all of us in the House today are delighted with the clean bill of health given the Premier of Quebec by his physicians, which means that Mr. Bourassa has recovered.

It is good news for Quebec that Mr. Bourassa is ready to finish his term, defending the interests of Quebecers as he has done throughout his life.

Like in the case of any Canadian family that has been struck by illness, we were very glad to hear this excellent news.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   PREMIER OF QUEBEC
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FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE

NDP

Steve Butland

New Democratic Party

Mr. Steve Butland (Sault Ste. Marie):

Mr. Speaker, I want to make a critical comment on the issue of this federal government's minimum wage for people 17 years of age and older.

The federal minimum wage is below that of all the provinces and the states of Kentucky, Oklahoma, New York, Idaho, Montana, et cetera. Just how low is the federal minimum wage? Would you believe $4 an hour, Mr. Speaker?

The fact that most employees in Canada are governed by provincial standards and the collective bargaining process and there are very few individuals affected by the $4 an hour wage merely aggravates the situation. The fact that so few are affected does not negate the fact that this is exploitive and unjust and makes action more necessary and urgent.

The minister has indicated to me that his staff is reviewing the $4 an hour wage policy. I ask him to immediately pursue an Order in Council to rectify this totally unacceptable situation and grant these individuals an immediate increase.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE
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INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

PC

Louise Feltham

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Louise Feltham (Wild Rose):

Mr. Speaker, governments have to adapt to meet the realities of the 1990s, particularly in the area of fiscal restraint.

Governments must be creative and innovative if we are to meet the future demands of taxpayers. In this regard, I am pleased to inform the House that the Minister of Western Economic Diversification and the Alberta minister of federal and intergovernmental affairs yesterday announced the results of a review to reduce overlap and duplication between the Governments of Canada and Alberta.

While the task will be an ongoing one, progress has already been achieved. Both ministers have asked the public to assist a joint government effort to reduce overlap and duplication by providing ideas, advice and comments directly to their offices.

I applaud these efforts and encourage everyone to participate in this endeavour.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS
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CHILD POVERTY

LIB

Albina Guarnieri

Liberal

Ms. Albina Guamieri (Mississauga East):

Mr. Speaker, one million Canadian children will rely on food banks this month to stave off hunger while they suffer in poverty.

Parents and teachers will have to tell these children that the very Prime Minister who stood on the international stage to take credit for the UN convention on children has betrayed them yet again.

The Prime Minister will take $1 million out of funds that could be spent on hungry children for his final stray cat strut around the globe. The Prime Minister is content to have the red carpet rolled out for him abroad while children eat off the floor at home.

Perhaps his protege, the Minister of National Defence, will be able to cut the deficit because she knows how to take a trip without leaving her office.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   CHILD POVERTY
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AIRLINE INDUSTRY

PC

Alan Redway

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Alan Redway (Don Valley East):

Mr. Speaker, pity the poor Minister of Transport.

If he lets American Airlines buy an interest in Canadian Airlines International he will be accused of allowing foreigners to get control of our skies, creating job losses at Gemini, perhaps destroying Gemini itself and putting Air Canada in jeopardy.

On the other hand, if he does not let American buy an interest in Canadian and encourages a merger of Cana-

May 5, 1993

dian and Air Canada he will be accused of creating job losses at Canadian and eliminating competition.

Then if either Air Canada or Canadian should ask for financial help he will be accused of subsidizing business and encouraging inefficiency.

The poor guy, he is darned if he does and darned if he doesn't.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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FISHERIES

NDP

David Stupich

New Democratic Party

Mr. David D. Stupich (Nanaimo-Cowichan):

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans said in response to the Pearse-Larkin report that there would be no renewal of the aboriginal fisheries strategy this year unless there was a watershed agreement with respect to the Fraser River in particular.

Negotiations with the Americans on the Pacific salmon treaty have broken down. The fishermen are already suspicious about what the department is doing. Everybody involved in the industry is concerned that the department does not seem to be talking with any of the users, any of the people employed, or any of those who have any interest in the fishing industry in B.C.

We are heading into the next salmon season. It could be a very dangerous period if something is not done soon to get the people together, get them talking to each other, get them listening to each other, get them to agree on what is going to happen this year with respect to the watershed agreements if there are to be any, with respect to harvesting the resource, who will do the harvesting, and where it will be processed. All of these questions must be dealt with or we are going to be faced with a very serious period in the fishing industry in the province of British Columbia.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 31
Subtopic:   FISHERIES
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SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY

May 5, 1993