May 3, 1993

LIB

Réginald Bélair

Liberal

Mr. Reginald Belair (Cochrane-Superior):

Mr. Speaker, during the week of May 2 to May 8 Canadians will be celebrating National Forest Week. The 1993 theme will be Our Common Ground.

There is nothing common any more as the Conservative government is shafting the provinces and the forest industry with the financial burden in the application of

integrated forest management. So much for silviculture, reforestation, the protection of wildlife habitats and access roads for anglers and hunters.

Twenty thousand jobs will be lost when the Forest Resources Development Agreements are not renewed upon expiry. This will only fuel the environmentalist movement's efforts to tarnish our international reputation as a nation that neglects its forests.

During National Forest Week the question every Canadian should be asking themselves is: How can I help to make our forests better and more productive? The answer is: By removing this tired Conservative government.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL FOREST WEEK
Permalink

PEACEKEEPERS

PC

Gregory Francis Thompson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Greg Thompson (Carleton-Charlotte):

Mr. Speaker, Canada's peacekeeping soldiers have a long and distinguished history. However a recent spate of accusations by opposition members of Parliament casting shadows on their integrity and ability stem more from concern about the possibility of the Minister of National Defence becoming Canada's next Prime Minister than from the calibre of our soldiers in Somalia.

Lieutenant-General Gordon Reay said on the weekend that he is:

disturbed by attempts to use my soldiers as whipping boys in an

attempt to get defence minister Kim Campbell.

I and other Canadians agree with Lieutenant-General Reay. These fine men and women are doing their best in a very difficult situation, and attacks upon their integrity do not help.

The military justice system is currently investigating the Somali deaths. As members of Parliament we must learn to let them do their job and await the outcome of their investigation before casting doubts upon the capability of our Armed Forces.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PEACEKEEPERS
Permalink

PARLIAMENTARY EMPLOYMENT AND STAFF RELATIONS ACT

NDP

Lyle Stuart Kristiansen

New Democratic Party

Mr. Lyle Kristiansen (Kootenay West-Revelstoke):

Mr. Speaker, over the past almost seven years numerous questions, statements and speeches in this House by

May 3, 1993

myself and others have failed to elicit any reasonable response from this government as to why it has failed to proclaim its law, the labour standards and health and safety sections, parts II and III, of the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, which was passed by all parties in this House in June 1986.

The Prime Minister has failed to even reply to numerous repeated letters from Mr. Daryl Bean, the national president of the Public Service Alliance of Canada. Further, my attempts have resulted only in non-substantive acknowledgements from the PMO and the government House leader only verbally responded with mischievous diversions that were simply untrue.

My Motion No. 743, urging proclamation, comes up for debate on May 11. If the government continues to fail to explain why this basic legislation has not been proclaimed I urge MPs from all parties to give their consent to a renewed vote on this question and grant their support to this long overdue protection to those who serve us and Canada on Parliament Hill.

After seven years it is time.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PARLIAMENTARY EMPLOYMENT AND STAFF RELATIONS ACT
Permalink

THE BUDGET

PC

René John Soetens

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rene Soetens (Ontario):

Mr. Speaker, it has now

been one week since the finance minister introduced his second budget. It promised no new taxes or increased taxes. It also cut proposed spending over the next five years by almost $31 billion.

Our budget will allow Canada to lead the world in economic growth for 1993 and 1994. As Canadians learn more about our plans they will regain the confidence required to invest in Canada and to spend.

Some of our plans were previously announced in December and are already showing benefits. Canadians have invested in shares of business enterprises at record setting rates in each of the last four months. Our February gross domestic product grew at a rate of 0.4 per cent, a post-recession high. Employment has grown each month this year.

Even this past weekend was one of the warmest in many months and the Toronto Maple Leafs won their hockey series. It is amazing what a good budget can do.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Permalink
LIB

Jesse Philip Flis

Liberal

Mr. Jesse Flis (Parkdale-High Park):

Mr. Speaker, on this date over two centuries ago the Polish Parliament met in 1791 and affirmed the fundamental principles of democracy, freedoms which today we often take for granted.

In the same spirit of the democratic movement which swept across Europe and the Americas the proclamation of the constitution of 1791 came to represent a kind of bill of rights for later generations in Poland.

Tragically, the May 3 Constitution was crushed by invading armies of Europe, mostly out of fear of the liberal democratic movement. However the lessons of the past still hold true today.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. [English]

For example, in the former republic of Yugoslavia today there is a glimmer of hope for peace. The lesson is that we must always practice freedom of religion, we must always respect basic human rights and worship peace instead of war.

That is as true today as it was 202 years ago in Warsaw.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Permalink

NEW BRUNSWICK

PC

Robert Alfred Corbett

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bob Corbett (Fundy-Royal):

Mr. Speaker, I was pleased to note recently that the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council has forecast the strongest economic growth in the Atlantic region for the province of New Brunswick.

According to APEC, New Brunswick has regained all of the 12,000 jobs it lost during the recession and is looking healthy in recovery. The labour force is expanding again as new companies begin to open new businesses throughout the province.

The unemployment rate has declined to within one percentage point of the national average. The fixed link and federal funds for road building will help fuel the pace of economic growth in New Brunswick.

May 3, 1993

In spite of this rosy forecast APEC did point to the provincial deficit as a problem area. This underscores the need for all governments to work together to control deficits and debts.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NEW BRUNSWICK
Permalink

BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC

LIB

David Charles Dingwall (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. David Dingwall (Cape Breton-East Richmond):

Mr. Speaker, this past weekend Canadians in communities across our country observed the 50th anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic.

Our navy had become the third largest allied power with more than 100,000 sailors, including 6,800 women who served in shore establishments in Canada and

overseas as wrens.

Tragically, we lost 59 merchant ships and 32 naval vessels, 24 of them in the Battle of the Atlantic, and over

3,000 lives were lost.

Today, to those brave men and women of the Royal Canadian Navy and merchant marine who returned safely to our shores from the icy cold of the North Atlantic and to those who did not return, to those who went down to the sea in ships whilst serving their country, we honour their dedication and their defence of freedom.

Their service and their sacrifice still inspires us here at home and serves as a noble example to those many Canadians still serving in our Armed Forces in hostile places around the globe.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BATTLE OF THE ATLANTIC
Permalink

THE ECONOMY

PC

Claude Girvin (Girve) Fretz

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Girve Fretz (Erie):

Mr. Speaker, because my hon. friends across the floor are usually remiss in reporting good news to Canadians I feel compelled to rise in the House today.

Over the weekend The Globe and Mail reported that the Canadian economy grew 0.4 per cent in February. This is consistent with the economic indicators of the last three months, which show Canada's GDP rising.

That is only part of the good news. The other part is that February's surge in output brings the total value of

Canada's goods and services, our GDP, to its highest level since March 1990, when our economy took a downturn. In other words, not only is the recession over but our economy is now stronger than when the recession began.

For many months the opposition has called for an end to our efforts at restructuring. It has said: Cancel free trade, cancel the GST, cancel NAFTA, increase spending.

By rejecting these so-called alternatives and remaining committed to our goals of freer markets, fair taxation and fiscal prudence we have laid the foundation for a higher quality of growth and a stronger economy for the long term.

If I can quote the reaction to Saturday's figures of the assistant chief economist at the Royal Bank: "We are on the right track. Things are-"

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Permalink
PC

Gerald R. Ottenheimer (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member's time has expired.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Permalink

PARTY LEADERS

LIB

Stan Kazmierczak Keyes

Liberal

Mr. Stan Keyes (Hamilton West):

Mr. Speaker:

While Brian Mulroney will travel the globe all decked out in a fancy wardrobe he will spend a million to find a new job won't give a hoot about the loud angry mob

While he takes a jet and the Cadillac tour all the while scrimping on this country's poor there's a leader who cares and I'll gladly mention that that man is none other than Jean Chretien

Fresh from a tour in Hamilton/Niagara by bus veejay Erica Ehm made a big fuss over Chretien at Stelco and Chretien in Toronto and with a man in touch with the needs of the people

While Kim Campbell says she wants users to pay for a medicare system Chretien says no way it's a right, he says, it's a right they forget So don't place your money on that foolish bet

After being promised jobs jobs jobs back in '84 and the only one you've had is to mop the floor ask if you're better off today than you were back then bet you'll say no but will trust Jean Chretien

You can change the label you can change the name but that can of tuna's still tainted all the same all I want to do, is ask one simple question will you be better off with the same indigestion?

May 3, 1993

5. O. 31 JUSTICE

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PARTY LEADERS
Permalink
PC

Louise Feltham

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Louise Feltham (Wild Rose):

Mr. Speaker, as a result of the fact that all Canadians have the desire to feel safe and secure in their homes our government has placed justice issues high on its list of priorities.

However only so much can be done with legislation alone. Each Canadian citizen has a responsibility to help the system do its job by being involved in the community and taking an active part in helping local police by being alert and co-operative.

Parents also have a special responsibility to teach then-children that police are to be respected and not feared and to instil a belief in law and order.

To be good citizens we must be cognizant that making laws to protect Canadians is only the first step. All of us must help to enforce those laws if they are to be effective in combating crime.

In many cases the greatest weapon criminals have against us is our reluctance to get involved.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PARTY LEADERS
Permalink

TREE PLANTERS

NDP

Brian L. Gardiner

New Democratic Party

Mr. Brian L. Gardiner (Prince George -Bulkley Valley):

Mr. Speaker, they began arriving a short time ago with unique hair styles, pack sacks, shovels and other gear into communities throughout Canada to help replant our forests. It is tree planting time.

Tree planters, a lot of them university students, are the unsung heroes of our forests, out to help the environment and make a few bucks to finance their education.

Yesterday in Prince George, B.C. there was a tree planters picnic to give everyone a chance to say hello and wish them well, and there were events in Ontario and other communities and provinces across the country. Whether it is for government or the private sector tree planting is an important part of the sustainable development of our forests.

We urge the government to reconsider its budget decision that plans to eliminate forest agreements with the provinces. These agreements have helped replant our forests and fund much needed research.

We say to the tree planters: Work hard, be careful, and when you take some time off, go easy. Thank you.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   TREE PLANTERS
Permalink

May 3, 1993