April 30, 1993

LIB

Mac Harb

Liberal

Mr. Mac Harb (Ottawa Centre):

Madam Speaker, I would like to publicly deplore the actions of an extremist right wing organization, the Heritage Front, along with others that are spreading hate propaganda, anti-Semitism and white supremacy in our community. The people of this city do not support this type of action.

We must protect the cultural mosaic of Canada. Our community requires a proactive approach. I am calling on the government to amend the Criminal Code to ensure effective means are implemented to deter hate propaganda.

Furthermore, I am calling on the government to facilitate the establishment of a working group in order to examine ways to ensure that racist organizations do not continue to flourish in our community.

April 30, 1993

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   RACIAL DISCRIMINATION
Permalink

NATIONAL DEFENCE

NDP

Robert Evans Skelly

New Democratic Party

Mr. Robert E. Skelly (Comox-Albemi):

Madam Speaker, the commanding officer of the Canadian Forces Marine Testing Range at Nanoose, B.C. recently announced that Canadian and U.S. Armed Forces have jointly committed to extending the agreement on the base for another 10 years. This fait accompli comes despite the fact that the base agreement does not even come up for renewal until 1996.

The base receives regular visits from nuclear powered and nuclear capable vessels. Documented accidents, including the disintegration of a Soviet nuclear submarine in Norwegian waters last fall, attest to the health and environment risks posed by these vessels.

There have been repeated calls for environmental impact studies to assess the dangers and for conversion of the base. A year ago the B.C. government declared the province a nuclear weapon free zone and earlier this month the city of Nanaimo voted to support conversion of the base to peacetime use.

The cold war is over yet the Canadian military has apparently entered into an agreement to continue cold war operations into the next centuiy.

When is the minister of defence going to take command of the Canadian Armed Forces and follow Canadian priorities rather than-

{Translation]

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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PC

Andrée Champagne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Madam Deputy Speaker:

I am sorry but the hon. member's time is up.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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CONSUMER CREDIT

PC

Barry D. Moore (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Barry Moore (Pontiac-Gatineau-Labelle):

Madam Speaker, this year the federal government is highlighting the importance of consumer credit during National Consumer Week in order that consumers can act with full knowledge when they use the credit options that are available to them.

It seems clear that marketplace conditions affecting the use of credit have undergone fundamental changes and that these conditions are likely to persist.

Oral Questions

For example, while some types of consumer debts have declined from their recent peak level the use of consumer credit is still more common than it was a decade ago. Another change involves the misuse of credit, particularly credit cards.

To address this the Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs is communicating his concerns to the provinces and to credit grantors and asking them to provide their ideas on how problems of excessive indebtedness can be prevented and how the importance of the wise use of credit can be communicated effectively to consumers.

In addition to co-operative action with provincial governments and credit grantors, the Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs will continue to make information on the wise use of credit available. This will help consumers better understand how to manage their credit responsibilities.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CONSUMER CREDIT
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD



AIRLINE INDUSTRY

LIB

John Paul Manley

Liberal

Mr. John Manley (Ottawa South):

Madam Speaker, perhaps there is a minister who could answer a question on transport today.

Yesterday Hollis Harris, president of Air Canada, announced that there were more job losses in the works at Air Canada. The deterioration of the airline industry in Canada is a symbol of the government's incompetence.

On the one hand, the Minister of National Defence does not believe there is enough traffic in the industry for two airline companies, as she stated recently on the program aujourd'hui dimanche. On the other hand, the Minister of Transport has said, and I quote: "It is in the best interests of consumers and the travelling public to have two airline companies".

What is the government's policy on the future of the airline industry in Canada? Does the government have any idea what it wants for the future of that important industry?

April 30, 1993

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport):

Madam Speaker, it must be Friday. We get this question every Friday and the answer remains the same whether the Minister of Transport replies or I reply.

The answer simply is of course that the government is very concerned about the state of the airline industry as we are about the state of the airline industry around the world. Obviously in a recession and as a result of the gulf war airline industries around the world are in a difficult situation.

We are awaiting results of the NTA review of the current application of Canadian for an arrangement with American airlines. The government has got itself out of the airline business. We are waiting for a private sector solution. We are encouraged that one will soon be found.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Permalink
LIB

John Paul Manley

Liberal

Mr. John Manley (Ottawa South):

Madam Speaker, I do not think the parliamentary secretary heard the drift of the question which raised new information that has come out recently.

He knows very well that in light of the decision of the competition tribunal last week, Canadian Airlines International is struggling to survive by seeking the co-operation of its employees and, most important, its creditors.

In the midst of all this the Minister of National Defence, a senior minister in government, decides to announce her learned opinion that Canada does not have enough traffic for two airlines. What message is she seeking to send to the creditors of Canadian Airlines? Is it that it is time to smash and grab? What message does the government have for those creditors?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport):

Madam Speaker, as I said in my initial response, the position of the government has not changed in this regard at all.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Permalink
LIB

John Paul Manley

Liberal

Mr. John Manley (Ottawa South):

The position has not changed. It does not have one, Madam Speaker.

As I said before, Air Canada president Hollis Harris announced yesterday there would be another substantial loss of jobs at Air Canada. Meanwhile, the government is

not charging Air Canada's competitors full landing fees and other taxes payable to the Government of Canada.

Why does the government maintain this double standard for air carriers? Why is the government just waiting for our airlines to go under?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of TVansport):

Madam Speaker, I think everyone in the House is aware of the difficult situation of Canadian Airlines and of all airlines in Canada at the present time. This kind of rhetoric does not help the situation at all.

We have been working very closely with all airlines in the country to ensure an ongoing competitive airline situation in Canada. The hon. member knows very well about our efforts, and again I do not think this kind of rhetoric helps the situation at all.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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LIB

André Ouellet

Liberal

Hon. Andre Ouellet (Papineau-Saint-Michel):

Madam Speaker, my question is not directed to the parliamentary secretary because his answers are entirely unsatisfactory. Air Canada has just announced that 2,200 employees will lose their jobs. This is not rhetoric. This is grim reality. We can blame the Conservative government for failing to act in the transportation sector.

I therefore want to ask one of the ministers from Quebec-not many are here today, but I would like to ask one of them-what this government intends to do to help Air Canada deal with its current economic problems, a company that under the Liberals was one of the seven best companies in the world and provided 24,000 jobs. I may remind the minister that today, Air Canada has only 6,000 employees in Montreal.

When will the Conservative government wake up and help this company remain viable, a Canadian company that creates jobs and keeps jobs in Montreal?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of TVansport):

Madam Speaker, I think I should respond by first mentioning that the Minister of Transport is a Quebec minister. The minister is very aware of the situation with regard to Air Canada.

April 30, 1993

However I go back to my response to the member for Ottawa South. World airlines are in a difficult situation as a result of (a) the gulf war and (b) the world recession.

This is not a situation unique to Canada. There is clearly overcapacity in Canada and these matters are being worked out.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Permalink
LIB

André Ouellet

Liberal

Hon. Andre Ouellet (Papineau -Saint-Michel):

Madam Speaker, the parliamentary secretary says this is a global problem. We are not talking about problems caused by the gulf war but about Tory policies, including deregulation, which created this problem facing Canadian companies today.

Earlier, my colleague asked some specific questions about Canadian airlines. I am now asking specific questions about Air Canada, and the parliamentary secretary tells us that the minister is from Montreal and he is keeping a close watch on the situation. The present minister may be from Montreal, but four of his predecessors were also from Quebec or the Montreal region and nobody has done anything whatsoever to help Air Canada.

Again, I want to ask when this government is going to get a consistent policy for the air transportation sector in order to save Canada's air transportation industry.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Permalink
PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Transport):

Madam Speaker, again I can appreciate the member's concern, coming late into this discussion.

On the other hand we have recently received the NTA report. One of the recommendations of the NTA report is on deregulation and how in fact it is working and working well across the country.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIRLINE INDUSTRY
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THE BUDGET

April 30, 1993