March 15, 1993

THE GOODS AND SERVICES TAX

LIB

Diane Marleau (Deputy Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mrs. Diane Marleau (Sudbury):

Mr. Speaker, Australian voters have said no to the GST and therefore will not suffer the disastrous effects of such a tax. Congratulations, Australia.

Here in Canada citizens did not have the same opportunity for honest and open debate to either approve or reject this tax before the Conservative government railroaded us into this terribly complex GST regime.

The Minister for International Trade has decided not to run for the leadership of the Conservative Party because he cannot divorce himself from Conservative policies like the GST.

It matters not who leads the Conservative Party. Canadians remember that this is the party that, among other disastrous policies, imposed the GST. Canadians have and are suffering the consequences.

Soon Canadians will have a say and then this government will pay the price.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE GOODS AND SERVICES TAX
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EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION

PC

William D. (Bill) Casey

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bill Casey (Cumberland -Colchester):

Mr. Speaker, although staffing of the CEIC office in Springhill, Nova Scotia has recently been reduced I am assured that

March 15, 1993

services will be fully maintained and the office will remain open.

This office has served the western part of Cumberland county for many years and plays an important and essential role in the lives of people in the area.

Western Cumberland county has suffered several negative economic impacts, and although there are now some promising developments the office must be maintained.

I will be monitoring the future of the Springhill office and working with the minister to ensure that traditional services continue and the Springhill office stays open for business.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT AND IMMIGRATION
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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

NDP

Cyril (Cid) Samson

New Democratic Party

Mr. Cid Samson (Timmins -Chapleau):

Mr. Speaker, thousands of people came out in Toronto on Saturday in the storm of the century to produce a storm of their own in protesting the UI cuts. These people obviously agree with the 58 per cent in an Ekos research poll that the proposed changes are a clear departure from the Canadian tradition of providing income support for the unemployed.

They were wanned by their concern for the unemployed and the impoverished and their outrage against the government's attack on the unemployed, both of which led them out into the bitter weather conditions.

The government should be listening to these dedicated individuals and to the majority of Canadians. The government's economic failure to control unemployment should not be shifted onto the backs of the unemployed.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
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WORLD CONSUMER RIGHTS DAY

PC

Michel Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources; Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Forestry)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Michel Champagne (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, today is World Consumer Rights Day as proclaimed by the International Organization of Consumer Unions. This year's theme concerns transnational corporations and consumer interests. Throughout the world, consumers will celebrate this anniversary by taking part in activities emphasizing their contribution to society.

Consumers have a vital role to play in maintaining Canada's prosperity and competitiveness. Volunteers who work for consumer groups have spoken up for their rights as consumers and have been acknowledged by the Government of Canada.

We want to see a strong consumer movement that continues to promote the needs of consumers. Founded in 1960 by five consumer associations from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, the Netherlands and Belgium, the IOCU now has 170 organizations representing 65 countries on five continents. The IOCU deals with consumer problems at the international level, including those related to medical products, pesticides, tobacco and infant formulas.

That is why, as Canadian parliamentarians, through our Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, we support a movement that is so important for Canadian consumers.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   WORLD CONSUMER RIGHTS DAY
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PEACEKEEPING

LIB

Lloyd Axworthy

Liberal

Hon. Lloyd Axworthy (Winnipeg South Centre):

Mr. Speaker, it is not generally my custom to wear any insignia or badge on my lapel with the colour blue on it. However it is with great honour that I am wearing a blue ribbon today to salute the creation of the blue beret group, designed to honour and recognize the men and women serving in our peacekeeping missions in widespread areas around the world.

This blue beret group is the idea of Mrs. Cathy Sargent, who is the wife of a peacekeeping officer. In this new age of peacekeeping in which an increasing number of Canadians are putting their lives at risk it is critical that we find ways to say to them: We take pride in their actions; we support their efforts; and we have not forgotten them.

Other members on both sides of the House should also consider wearing a blue ribbon. I would be glad to supply them with these ribbons.

I also call on the government to endorse the notion of a blue beret day in Canada to honour our peacekeepers.

I urge the Minister of National Defence to meet with the founding members of this group in Winnipeg so we could perhaps make this a national identification.

March 15, 1993

Members will remember that during the gulf war thousands of American citizens wore yellow ribbons to support their troops in that area. Let us make the blue ribbon a nation-wide symbol in recognition of our peacekeeping troops and their courageous efforts to try to maintain peace world-wide.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PEACEKEEPING
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THE BRIER

PC

Douglas Fee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Doug Fee (Red Deer):

Mr. Speaker, Ottawa was the site of some exciting curling this past week as the Brier came to town. Congratulations are due to Russ Howard and his Ontario rink who won the right to represent Canada at the world tournament in Geneva at the end of the month.

Those watching the Brier saw all sorts of red stetsons in the stands. The trademark hats are being sported by the 1994 Brier committee. They were here to promote next year's event in Red Deer, Alberta.

They did a fine job. Tickets for next year's Brier were snapped up and people are in for a treat when they visit Red Deer next year. There is not a bad seat in our new Centrium and there will be plenty to do between draws. Red Deer is one of the smallest cities to ever host a Brier but the 1994 Brier will be big on hospitality and the enthusiasm of the organizing committee promises a great time for all.

I encourage all curling fans to hightail it to Red Deer for the Brier in 1994.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BRIER
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PARLIAMENTARY EMPLOYMENT AND STAFF RELATIONS ACT

NDP

Lyle Stuart Kristiansen

New Democratic Party

Mr. Lyle Kristiansen (Kootenay West-Revelstoke):

Mr. Speaker, this government clearly does not know its own mind with regard to its own staff relations. Six and three-quarter years ago, in June 1986, this Tory government drafted, introduced and, with all-party support, passed Bill C-45, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, through both the House and Senate and Royal Assent was given.

However the cabinet has still not acted to proclaim the operative sections, parts II and III, which simply extend to parliamentary employees the same labour standards

and health and safety protections enjoyed by all other federal workers.

This almost seven-year delay has to be the longest legislative pregnancy in history, and it was not an immaculate conception. It is a Tory baby and it begs the question: Did the government not know what it was doing in 1986 or does it not know what it is doing now? When is it going to deliver?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PARLIAMENTARY EMPLOYMENT AND STAFF RELATIONS ACT
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YOUNG OFFENDERS ACT

PC

Scott Jon Thorkelson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Scott Thorkelson (Edmonton -Strathcona):

Mr. Speaker, on March 41 hosted a special town hall meeting in my riding. The subject of the meeting was public safety and the Young Offenders Act.

We had a high turn-out, which clearly shows the level of public concern about this issue. A panel of experts was on hand to answer questions. The discussion was lively and often heated.

My constituents were very clear. They are tired of seeing a disproportionate amount of crime committed by young offenders. They want major changes to the Young Offenders Act so that the act can serve as a real deterrent. They recognize that it is only a handful of repeat young offenders who give all youth a bad name and they want the means to deal severely with these few.

Once again I urge the Minister of Justice and the Solicitor General to overhaul the Young Offenders Act. It is painfully clear to the residents of Edmonton- Strathcona that the act is not working. The age for transfer to adult court should be lowered and penalties for repeat offenders should be strengthened. A review of the act has long been promised but the time for action is now.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   YOUNG OFFENDERS ACT
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POULTRY INDUSTRY

LIB

Ralph Ferguson

Liberal

Hon. Ralph Ferguson (Lambton -Middlesex):

Mr. Speaker, when is chicken not chicken? When it is left to this government and its trade negotiators.

According to article 706 of the free trade agreement with the United States, import restrictions do not apply on 13 different types of further processed chicken. The definition states that chicken and chicken products do

Oral Questions

not include chicken cordon bleu, breaded chicken cordon blue, chicken Kiev, chicken breaded Kiev, boneless Rock Cornish with rice, stuffed Rock Cornish, boneless chicken, chicken Romanov, chicken Neptune, chicken TV dinners, old roosters and spent fowl. Of course we see a lot of old roosters across the way.

This is a loophole large enough to drive a truck through. Indeed Campbell's Soup has decided to do just that: bring truckloads of further processed chicken into Canada. Campbell's is selling its St. Mary's, Ontario, plant which supplied chicken for its soup and TV dinners and will import lower quality U.S. processed chicken instead.

I call on the government to take advantage of the U.S. government's desire for side trade agreements to close this and all similar loopholes that are haemorrhaging jobs out of Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   POULTRY INDUSTRY
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

THE ECONOMY

March 15, 1993