April 9, 1992

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT

PC

Pauline Browes (Minister of State (Environment))

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Pauline Browes (Minister of State (Environment)):

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act established the legislative mandate for collecting, analysing, and reporting environmental information and providing that information in a report to Canadians.

Therefore it is my great honour today to table, in both official languages, the second report on the state of Canada's environment.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   TABLING OF SECOND REPORT
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GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO PETITIONS

PC

Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lee Richardson (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of TVansport):

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Orders 36(8), I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the government's response to 12 petitions.

[Editor's Note: See today's Votes and Proceedings.]

75TH ANNIVERSARY OF BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO PETITIONS
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PC

Mary Collins (Minister responsible for the Status of Women; Associate Minister of National Defence)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Mary Collins (Associate Minister of National Defence and Minister responsible for the Status of Women):

Mr. Speaker, today, Canada is commemorating

the 75th anniversary of the battle of Vimy Ridge, the most important military victory in our history.

Just hours ago, the Prime Minister and the President of France stood before the Vimy Memorial and spoke of the significance of that success.

Mr. Speaker, as your father and three of your uncles were with the Canadian Corps in France, you will certainly know the importance of the Vimy victory reached beyond the battlefields of France and Belgium.

Vimy was the first time all four divisions of the Canadian Corps fought together as a single force. The enemy had held Vimy Ridge against all comers and it would become the graveyard of well over 100,000 allied troops.

Yet, 75 years ago today, the Canadian Corps stormed into the history books. The snow and rain shielding their successful advance was like the weather at home. The tactics were also all Canadian, innovative, well rehearsed, and involving every one from general to private in the battle plan.

The capture of Vimy Ridge changed our nation. Domestically it confirmed that our pioneering people were capable of meeting any challenge. Internationally we were soon more than just a junior partner.

Today 14 veterans of Vimy, ranging in age from 91 to 101, are back at the battleground of their youth. They are being accompanied by veterans who followed in their tradition, the soldiers who took part in the Dieppe raid 50 years ago, where once again Canadians were chosen to lead an allied assault.

Last Sunday I had the honour of meeting our Vimy veterans. At the service at the National War Memorial the rabbi spoke of both the pain and the pride. How right he is. The pain obviously comes from the memory of so many friends, over 3,500 Canadians, who were killed and the bereaved families in need of comforting. The pride comes from the knowledge that they were the peacemakers of their time, the nation-builders of their day.

April 9, 1992

Routine Proceedings

Shortly after the end of the First World War an inscription was placed on a panel in the Peace Tower in this very building. It reads:

They are too near to be great, but our children shall understand

when and how our fate was changed, and by whose hand.

Last Sunday I shook hands with 14 of the men who were there on that Easter Monday in a battle which was described by Brigadier-General Alexander Ross, commander the 28th battalion at Vimy:

It was Canada from Atlantic to Pacific on parade. I thought then

that in those few moments, I witnessed the birth of a nation.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO PETITIONS
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LIB

George Albert Proud

Liberal

Mr. George Proud (Hillsborough):

Mr. Speaker, as was stated, 75 years ago, during the few days between the first assault and the time when the guns fell silent at Vimy Ridge, close to 4,000 young Canadians lay dead. History has shown that their sacrifice was not in vain.

We all know that what they accomplished on those cold April mornings was twofold. They captured a prime military objective, one which had earlier defied the efforts of both the French and the British. They also showed, during those few bloody days, that Canadians, working together as a team, were disciplined, motivated and could be counted on to get the job done.

We honour them today, both for the military victory, which helped an ally in a time of need and made Canada, in the words of my hon. colleague, an equal partner.

We honour them for being the first Canadians to go into battle, united as a single force. They were indeed among our nation builders.

We must never forget the lesson of Vimy Ridge. Canadians, working together, can accomplish what others fail to do. Let us not permit the forces, which would divide us, to make a mockery of the sacrifices that those Canadians made when they are called on to do so.

Today, we honour those valiant Canadians still alive from the battle of Vimy Ridge and we also remember those who did not return. Let us honour their memory by making sure that the Canada they fought and died for remains strong, united and free. To do less would be, in the words of the poet, John McCrae, "to break faith with those who die". This we must never do. The greatest memorial we can erect in their memory is a united country.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO PETITIONS
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NDP

Leslie Gordon Benjamin

New Democratic Party

Mr. Les Benjamin (Regina-Lumsden):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of my colleagues to pay tribute to all who fought for Vimy Ridge during more than two years of that war.

Vimy Ridge was a victory others were not able to accomplish. I do not denigrate their efforts; over 100,000 allied troops ended in the graveyard at Vimy Ridge. When Canadians were ordered to try to take it, they were smart enough to spend weeks in planning and preparation.

I remember reading years ago about the kind of planning and preparation that was carried out. One of the most notable was the miles and miles of tunnels that were dug, tunnels that started well to the rear and up to where German lines on Vimy Ridge began.

This made the operation all the more Canadian since hundreds of them who had some experience in this kind of endeavour were assigned to this dirty, wet and miserable task. Mr. Speaker, you will know among the tunnelers were miners from Quebec and northern Ontario and other parts of Canada. They knew what to do and how to do it.

It was the first time Canadians fought together as a unit: four divisions, about 60,000 soldiers. When you add to that the support groups required to ensure success, it had to amount to about 100,000 Canadians directly involved, nursing sisters, medical and first aid staff, thousands in the service corps who spent many weeks of preparation, hauling and stockpiling supplies with horses and trucks and on their backs. In frost and mud, they brought in food, medical supplies and equipment, ammunition of all kinds, clothes, especially socks and boots and there was never enough.

If you put all those contributions together, it added up to a victory equal to, if not greater than, any other in that war. But it was a victory of great cost in lives and suffering; over 3,000 killed and 8,000 wounded, a casualty rate of more than 10 per cent. But one thing we can be thankful for, that if it had not been for the planning and preparation as well as the courage, the casualties would have been much greater and we might not have won.

We honour their memory, and our country must always do so. I believe the best way we can honour all those who took part, and especially those who died or

April 9, 1992

Routine Proceedings

suffered wounds, is to implement and enlarge on the biblical verse: "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall inherit the Kingdom of God". Equally blessed is the peacekeeper.

I have always looked upon our peacemaking and peacekeeping efforts as a way to make as sure as we can that the valour of Vimy will not be in vain. For as those very people from both wars will tell you: "No more war, never again."

Our country can, on an ongoing basis, honour and remember great contributions and sacrifices at Vimy Ridge and many other events in two wars by continuing to make every effort at peacemaking and peacekeeping. This is the best way to honour and remember those we honour today, and those from many other battles.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO PETITIONS
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TRANSPORT

THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE

PC

Robert Alfred Corbett

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bob Corbett (Fundy-Royal):

Madam Speaker, the Standing Committee on Transport has the honour to present its third report.

In accordance with its order of reference of Wednesday, October 9, 1991, your committee has considered Bill C-33, an act respecting the use of foreign ships and non-duty paid ships in the coasting trade, and has agreed to report it with amendments.

[Editor's Note: See today's Votes and Proceedings.]

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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CRIMINAL RECORDS ACT

MEASURE TO AMEND

PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis (Solicitor General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Doug Lewis (Solicitor General of Canada) moved

for leave to introduce Bill C-71, an act to amend the Criminal Records Act and other acts in consequence thereof.

Topic:   CRIMINAL RECORDS ACT
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO AMEND
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PC

Andrée Champagne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Madam Deputy Speaker:

Pursuant to Standing Order 68(2), the motion is deemed adopted.

Mr. Lewis moves that the bill be now read the first time and printed.

Pursuant to Standing Order 69(1), the motion is deemed adopted.

[Bill read the first time and printed]

Topic:   CRIMINAL RECORDS ACT
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO AMEND
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INCOME TAX ACT

MEASURE TO AMEND

LIB

Guy H. Arseneault

Liberal

Mr. Guy H. Arseneault (Restigouche-Chaleur) moved

for leave to introduce C-342, an act to amend the Income Tax Act (teachers).

Topic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO AMEND
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PC

Andrée Champagne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Madam Deputy Speaker:

Pursuant to Standing Order 68(2), the motion is deemed adopted.

Topic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO AMEND
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LIB

Guy H. Arseneault

Liberal

Mr. Arseneault:

Madam Speaker, I welcome this opportunity to introduce a bill to amend the Income Thx Act with respect to teachers.

The purpose of this bill is to amend the Income Thx Act to allow teachers who teach in educational institutions in Canada to deduct in computing their income certain expenses made in the course of their employment, such as attendance at professional development days, expenses incurred in travel to conferences, whatever, as other professions now do.

Topic:   INCOME TAX ACT
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO AMEND
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April 9, 1992