December 22, 1988

CHOICE OF SAINT-LAURENT CONSTITUENCY

LIB

Shirley Maheu

Liberal

Mrs. Shirley Maheu (Saint-Laurent):

Mr. Speaker, my riding of Saint-Laurent is the centre of the high technology in Canada. The state-of-the-art technological developments produced there will put Canada at the forefront of the space industry. The creation of the Space Agency will help Canada to become an important partner in the development of space exploration. I was pleased to hear the Prime Minister tell the House that even ridings that had elected members to the Opposition would receive their fair share.

However, I am disappointed that the Government has not yet proceeded with its commitment to grant the space agency to Saint Laurent. Have the people of Saint Laurent suffered because of their rejection of my opponent in the election? Surely the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) would not give the space agency to Saint Laurent just because it is Premier Bourassa's riding but would because Saint Laurent deserves it.

I only hope the Government will keep its promise to give people their fair share and build the Space Agency in the most appropriate location, that is, in Saint-Laurent, which already has the necessary infrastructure.

December 22, 1988

Topic:   CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY
Subtopic:   CHOICE OF SAINT-LAURENT CONSTITUENCY
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THE LATE KARL HILSINGER

PC

William C. Winegard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for International Trade)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bill Winegard (Guelph-Wellington):

Mr. Speaker, the man known as the "Silver-Suited Skier" has died. Karl Hilsinger, former Canadian Football League all-star and sports consultant to the War Amputations of Canada, died of a heart attack last Thursday. He was 56.

We will all remember Karl Hilsinger as the doubleleg amputee who appeared in television commercials about the Child Amputee Program, the CHAMP program, sponsored by the War Amputations of Canada.

Karl participated in the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary. He joined with several others in the CHAMP program in skiing demonstrations and he took part in the Olympic Torch relay. During that relay, he refused to use a wheelchair. He carried the torch while walking on what he called his stubbies.

Karl's passing is a tragic loss to the 1,200 young amputees in the CHAMP program. According to Cliff Chadderton of the War Amps, the children worshipped him. He set the standard for how to overcome a disability. He was a man who dedicated his life to others. He will stand tall in our memories.

Topic:   THE LATE KARL HILSINGER
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THE LATE BERNT CARLSSON

NDP

John R. (Jack) Whittaker

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jack Whittaker (Okanagan-Similkameen- Merritt):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure I speak for all of us when I express our sorrow over the tragic crash last night in Scotland of a Pan Am Boeing 747 en route from London to New York.

The New Democrats have suffered a particular loss in that crash, for one of the passengers on that flight was Bernt Carlsson, the United Nations Commissioner for Namibia and a well-known member of our international socialist family.

The New Democratic Party had worked with Mr. Carlsson for more than a decade, especially since his election as Secretary General of the Socialist International in 1976. We were witness to his untiring efforts to improve East-West relations and to address problems of underdevelopment and conflict in the Third World.

In the course of this work we came to know him, and he came to know Canada through his visits here. He was a great socialist and a great friend of mankind. He will be sadly missed, not only by his friends and colleagues in the New Democratic Party but by all Canadians.

Topic:   THE LATE BERNT CARLSSON
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FREE TRADE

POSITION OF FARMERS

PC

Michel Champagne (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for External Relations)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Michel Champagne (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, in the last election campaign, the Liberals and the New Democrats have tried to scare the Canadian people, especially farmers, by telling them that free trade could threaten their future. On the contrary, Mr. Speaker, our Government was responsible enough to protect our marketing boards by including Article XI of GATT in Article 710 of the Agreement. That means, Mr. Speaker, that the Canadian dairy industry will stay in place and grow stronger and that the poultry and egg industries have been strengthened and protected as farmers had requested.

In addition, Mr. Speaker, we are sensitive to the fact that we export a lot of pork, beef and horticultural products to the United States. Mr. Speaker, as a responsible Government, we couldn't say no to those producers who need guaranteed access to the American market. We couldn't say no to developing a policy allowing our farmers to expand. That is why, Mr. Speaker, on November 21, Canadian farmers and cooperatives said yes to a Progressive Conservative Government as it is the only party to offer a positive and progressive option for the future of Canadian agriculture.

[DOT] (MIO)

Topic:   FREE TRADE
Subtopic:   POSITION OF FARMERS
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

ESKASONI-ELECTION OF BAND CHIEF


Mr. Russell MacLellan (Cape Breton-The Sydneys): Mr. Speaker, on November, 1988, an election was held in Eskasoni. In the band council election for chief the winner won by one vote.



December 22, 1988 There are allegations of irregularities in that election but the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs says that this matter cannot be dealt with for months. The town is split and there is not even any move for a recount. The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia says that it does not have the jurisdiction and the community of Eskasoni is split down the middle. There is nothing in the Indian Act to deal with this matter and the people of Eskasoni are being denied the rights that people in other electoral jurisdictions can take for granted and have without any problem. I ask the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to look into these irregularities and conduct a recount as soon as possible, and I would ask the Minister to bring in amendments to the Indian Act that would look after the shortcomings in the present legislation.


THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

PC

Ian Angus Ross Reid

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ross Reid (St. John's East):

Mr. Speaker, the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) ran the campaign of his life. He ran long and hard for the hearts and minds of Canadians.

Here is this great warrior for Canada wounded in battle, struggling on despite the will of the people, struggling on despite the coming bells of Christmas, struggling on despite the fact that no one is listening, continuing the campaign of his life. Struggling ever onward leading his tattered, weary, and worn band of loyal banditos.

Topic:   THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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PC

John Allen Fraser (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I am sorry I have to interrupt the Hon. Member but I think that his comments may well be inappropriate. The Hon. Member for Sault Ste. Marie.

Topic:   THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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PUBLIC SERVICE

EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE NEGOTIATIONS

NDP

Steve Butland

New Democratic Party

Mr. Steve Butland (Sault Ste. Marie):

Mr. Speaker, I welcome the opportunity to address the House on an issue which will likely affect all Canadians early in 1989. This issue is the negotiations or lack thereof between the federal Government and its 137,000 civil

servants. These negotiations could result in the largest strike in Canada's history.

The negotiation process has been stalemated by the Treasury Board and apparently its strategy is to offer little, request concessions, force overtime, and generally bully the workers into submission. There is also the ever present threat of cut-backs.

Morale is non-existent.

Generally these people are being treated as second-class citizens. It actually is no surprise since we have already experienced government's attitude to displaced workers as a result of free trade.

We should all make ourselves, as responsible representatives, aware of the plight of our civil servants, acknowledge it and finally address it before a most serious crisis is upon us.

Topic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
Subtopic:   EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE NEGOTIATIONS
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CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY

December 22, 1988