December 20, 1988

PC

Douglas Fee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fee:

Mr. Towers is very well respected in Red Deer, as evidenced by his regular large majorities with every election that he faced. There is no doubt that he had the confidence of a majority of the people in Red Deer. I have been impressed, even in Ottawa, as I wandered the halls talking to my colleagues on both sides of the House with the respect of which they talk about my predecessor. Probably more important than that, when staff members in the Commons, the security guards, even the bus drivers, find out where I am from, they ask and inquire after Mr. Towers and tell me that I have very big shoes to fill. 1 realize that I have big shoes to fill, and I am going to do my best to fill them.

I have also been told that there is only one proper way that I could officially recognize my predecessor, who in addition to providing total commitment to the people of Red Deer, was noted for his poetry. With the indulgence of the House and the Chair and with respect for the poet of Dromore, I would like to offer the following:

There's tough work ahead for Douglas Fee If I'm to serve as well as he Who, with lively verse before me came Into this House of national fame.

Alas no more will this House hear

From Dromore's Bard now in Red Deer

But I am here and though not a bard,

I am prepared to work just as hard.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

Douglas Fee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fee:

Mr. Chairman, through you to the House, I would have to state that I am not a poet, and that will probably be the last effort you will hear from me.

My riding is a reflection of the very best that the Province of Alberta has to offer. From the majestic Rockies in Banff National Park in the West, through to the bustling City of Red Deer in the East, our riding boasts beautiful scenery, sprawling farms and ranch land, rich resources and, most important, friendly, hard working people.

Agriculture is the basis of our economy, but we also rely very heavily on the energy sector, oil, gas, and petrochemicals. The Free Trade Agreement is going to have a profoundly positive impact on the energy sector as a whole and on my riding in particular. In the short time available, I would like to explain why we see benefits and why a clear majority of the voters in Red Deer supports the Free Trade Agreement.

First, let me deal with tariffs.

The eventual elimination of tariffs will allow the free exchange of goods across the Canadian-American border. Most of our natural resources already cross that border duty-free, but tariffs are still quite high on value-added goods. As a result of the Free Trade Agreement, not only will Canadians be able to increase their exports, particularly in further processed goods, but Canadian consumers and manufacturers will have access to lower priced goods. As has been expressed earlier in the House, the Canadian consumer will be the ultimate winner from the free trade arrangement.

Under this agreement both Governments agree not to discriminate against foreign purchasers of energy by using export taxes. In other words, price will be determined in the market-place where it should be determined. All provincial and federal rights to develop our energy resources in Canada remain intact. The Free Trade Agreement is a logical, consistent step toward a freer market in energy. It meets all our prior obligations to the International Energy Agency.

This Government began the liberalization process when it abolished the National Energy Program and the Petroleum Gas Revenue Tax. I was somewhat shocked

December 20, 1988

yesterday when I heard Members on the opposite side of the Elouse say that this agreement would prevent the institution of another national energy program. For the people of my riding that is a very good reason for supporting the Free Trade Agreement. We do not want another national energy program.

The National Energy Program and the PGRT absolutely devastated small Canadian-owned oil companies in my constituency. Several Canadians lost a lot of money and a lot of faith in government with those two programs. They are getting that faith and confidence back. The entrepreneurs in the Alberta oil patch have started over again. I talked to several of these people throughout the election campaign, and they told me emphatically that they do not need nor do they want Governments telling them how to run their business. They want the opportunity to compete fairly. They want the market that will be secured by the Free Trade Agreement.

The Free Trade Agreement confirms each country's commitment to move toward a liberalized investment climate. Canada will retain important rights to monitor foreign investment. In energy, takeovers of healthy Canadian companies by foreigners are prohibited.

Both Governments have agreed to apply the respective rules and regulations to everyone, regardless of their country of origin. In other words, the Americans will not discriminate against Canadian companies doing business in the United States simply because they are Canadian and vice versa.

Each Government, however, retains the right to establish whatever safety standards or environmental regulations it wishes. Those who want to do business in Canada will have to play by Canadian rules. Provisions for national treatment do not and will not apply to social programs or medical services, regardless of what the Opposition would try to have us believe.

The Free Trade Agreement confirms our commitment to the principles of GATT and the International Energy Agency. This means only that when we cut back production we will allow the Americans a chance to bid on a proportion of remaining production. We do not have to give our energy away, but in times of international shortage we will not turn our back on our neighbour and our best customer, either.

We still retain the right to provide government incentives for exploration and development of our energy resources, but perhaps the greatest achievement of our Free Trade Agreement is its creation of a secure

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

trading environment. With the elimination of tariffs and a commitment to national treatment, cross border trade will undoubtedly increase. Since 85 per cent of our energy exports go to the United States, it is essential that we secure access to that market.

Secure access will lead to more investment. This will result in the development of large scale energy projects like the one announced last week by the Caroline Area Gas Producing Group in my riding. It plans to invest $600 million to build a natural gas refinery, employing over 1,400 construction workers and ultimate employment for 150 people. There was the announcement by the Minister for International Trade yesterday that the Joffre plant just outside my constituency will be expanded with a third phase by Novacor. It is another investment of a half billion dollars. It will have very positive and long lasting effects on my constituency.

These projects require a staggering amount of capital in order to be built, in fact more capital than Canada alone can provide. A stable trading environment will encourage investors to plan for a longer term. This will mean more money spent in Canada, more jobs, and greater prosperity for Canadians.

I find it amazing that in my constituency there are so many examples of positive reactions to the re-election of the Conservative Government and the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement, and that people sitting in the Opposition can only find doom and gloom about it.

This agreement offers Canadians an opportunity to become more than hewers of wood and drawers of water. Lower tariffs, secure access to large markets, and more investment will promote diversification. We will be able to refine our natural resources right here in Canada and sell the refined products abroad, rather than ship out raw materials. This means more jobs and better jobs for Canadians.

Another example from my constituency is Sun Pine Forest Products. It is planning a huge expansion of its timber processing business, in anticipation of an increased market in the United States. It is building an 80 million board foot sawmill near Rocky Mountain House. It will include a chipper, planer mill, dry kilns, a CCA treatment plant, and a fibre board plant. Some $32.5 million will be invested to create 267 long-term jobs. Estimates are that over 600 construction jobs will be created and 530 indirect jobs. Sun Pine's payroll will be over $17 million a year. This kind of investment will have a profound impact on our local economy. It is a

December 20, 1988

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

prime example of the benefits secure access to a large market can bring.

There is still a huge, untapped potential in Alberta's energy resources. This agreement will enhance our security of supply. Security of supply depends on a strong domestic energy industry, capable of developing new energy resources to meet future requirements. Free trade will strengthen Canada's energy industry, both through new investment and through an increase in exploration and development activity. In turn, this will enable the industry to find and develop the energy resources necessary to ensure that Canada's requirements are met.

Finally, the Free Trade Agreement is important for the long-term viability of the energy sector because it provides, for the first time, a means by which Canada and the United States can settle trade disputes when they arise.

The binational dispute settlement mechanism, and the commitment to prior consultation concerning trade legislation affecting the other country, will ensure that trade between Canada and the United States operates fairly and reasonably. With this arrangement in place we no longer need to talk about mice and elephants. Canadians and Americans will meet as equals.

The people of my constituency and I believe that as long as the rules of the game are followed we can compete with the best in the world. We will still have to work long and hard, because even though the Free Trade Agreement creates an opportunity we must go out there and take advantage of it.

My Province of Alberta is a province of pioneers. Our parents and grandparents settled the land. They passed down to us a solid rural work ethic. We still believe that the good Lord helps those who help themselves, that hard work should be rewarded, and that there is a place in our world for creative and free enterprise.

Albertans are bold and independent. They do not want government to intervene in areas where they can take better care of themselves. We are not afraid of competition. We have met challenges before. We look forward to the challenge of maximizing the benefits of the Free Trade Agreement.

I conclude by saying that the Free Trade Agreement is a golden opportunity not just for Red Deer, not just for Alberta, but for all the regions of Canada. By further opening up and securing access to American markets, the Free Trade Agreement will promote

regional development and therefore stronger regions and a stronger Canada.

This agreement will be successful not because it weakens central Canada but because it strengthens the regions. Regions of Canada do not want to rely on handouts, nor do we want to remove ourselves somehow from Confederation. We only want a chance to live up to our potential. This agreement will help us do that.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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LIB

Joseph Blair (Joe) McGuire

Liberal

Mr. McGuire:

Mr. Chairman, it is an honour for me to rise in my place tonight representing the great riding of Egmont in the House of Commons. Egmont has had many distinguished representatives over the years, including Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King when he first became Prime Minister in 1919, Colonel James Ralston, Minister of War during World War II, and the Hon. J. Watson MacNaught who served as Solicitor General of Canada, to name just a few.

I pledge to my constituents of Egmont that I will represent their views to the best of my ability and in the best tradition of my predecessors. The riding of Egmont in western Prince Edward Island is a district whose wealth is based on agriculture, fishing, and tourism. Egmont is an urban-rural riding whose population is fairly evenly distributed between the urban areas of Summerside, St. Eleanor's, and Wilmot, and the rural area which stretches from St. Eleanor's to the northwestern tip of Prince Edward Island.

The riding of Egmont voted decisively against the Government's Free Trade Agreement. This agreement was described to me by a fisherman in my riding as being like an iceberg which is approximately one-tenth above water and approximately nine-tenths below water. Indeed that was and still is an apt description of the Free Trade Agreement.

Because there is no definition of what is a subsidy, because regional development programs are not guaranteed, because there is no assurance that marketing boards will survive this agreement, and because the support programs for our fishermen will likely be discontinued, the iceberg analogy is very applicable. There is far too much that we do not know or understand about this agreement. The Canadian people are not being told and will not be told what is likely to happen to them, except that there will be winners and losers.

December 20, 1988

The farmers in my riding feel that they will be losers. The fishermen in my riding feel that they will be losers, and the youth and senior citizens feel that they will be losers.

Our forefathers came to this country to escape the harsh rule and greed of the class society in Europe. The Scotsmen came here after it was discovered that sheep were more valuable than people and they were evicted from their ancestral lands and told to fend for themselves. The Irish came here to escape oppression and famine in a country where they were not allowed to own their own land or to raise meat to feed themselves. Other Europeans came here to escape tyranny and war, and in Canada, they joined with the French Canadians to build a different, more caring society for themselves and their children.

They wanted to build a country in which there were no lords of the manor. They wanted a country based on rights and freedoms that they could only dream about in Europe at that time. They came here and built such a nation, a nation in which free and caring people were the basic building blocks and in which greed was never a national characteristic.

There are new lords of the manor who are taking over the direction of this country. The American multinational corporations and the Canadian conglomerates with their insatiable appetite for optimum profit margins and who recognize no national boundaries are now orchestrating our society to suit their own ends.

During the recent election campaign, the large corporations spent millions and millions of dollars on advertising which was designed to influence the people of Canada, to threaten their workers, and to scare them with their doomsday predictions to the extent that their point of view won the day. Now they have a Government that will do their bidding for the next four years.

There were election activities of the most undemocratic sort imaginable. These corporations made a mockery of the Election Expenses Act. Now they will have their way in this country. They are the new lords of the manor.

The small farmers, the small inshore fishermen, senior citizens, and the truck drivers of Egmont, how can these ordinary Canadians hope to compete against the corporate might of Canada and the United States? The Economic Council of Canada predicted that there would be approximately 890 jobs created in Prince Edward Island over the next ten years as a result of the Free Trade Agreement. That is an average of 89 jobs a year.

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

What will be the price we will have to pay for these 89 jobs per year? How many dairy farmers will go out of business to create these 89 office jobs? How many hog farmers will survive once the subsidies to the industry are eliminated? How many potato farmers will suffer when the President of the United States invokes the Mitchell amendment and limits the importation of Canadian potatoes?

Potatoes are Prince Edward Island's major export. Under GATT, Canada succeeded in lifting import quotas ten years ago. Now we will have import quotas again. The economy of Prince Edward Island could be brutalized if our potato and fish exports are subject to limited entry to the United States market.

What will happen to the rural communities of Prince Edward Island when the farmers and fishermen go out of business? What will happen to the small businesses in these small communities? They will disappear and they will not be replaced. There will be no headlines in The Globe and Mail as there were when the tragedy of the Gillette Company was announced.

No one will notice the creeping devastation of the agricultural sector in Prince Edward Island. Time will pass and no one will notice as one farmer here and another one there falls by the wayside. The rural areas will slowly but surely become a waste land.

The Free Trade Agreement will finish the family farm in Prince Edward Island. That is why Prince Edward Islanders voted against the Tories in the recent election. They chose to believe the four island Liberal candidates and our esteemed Premier, the Hon. Joseph Ghiz, who said that this deal was a bad deal for P.E.I. and was a bad deal for Canada.

Prince Edward Islanders know their history. They know that the Atlantic area suffered economically when it joined Confederation. We joined in with a great experiment called Canada and redirected our trade east-west rather than south and east. As I said, we suffered economically because of this decision. However, over the years, economic opportunity has been more equalized across the nation. Transportation subsidies, regional development programs, and social programs like workers' compensation, the Canada Pension Plan, and the unemployment insurance program have been put in place. These great advances in the redistribution of our national wealth have given all our citizens an opportunity to share in the prosperity of this great nation.

The people in the Atlantic provinces, the people in the North and the people in the West have the gut feeling

December 20, 1988

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

that we will return to the bad old days of dog eat dog: If one happens to live in an area that is regionally disadvantaged, then tough, one can always move. People in the Atlantic provinces will again be forced to move to the United States to find employment, as they had to do at the turn of the century. This time, Canadians in other parts of the country will find themselves in the same predicament.

In conclusion, I believe that the Government has a responsibility to assure the people of Prince Edward Island, and indeed all the people of Atlantic Canada, that their interests, concerns, and way of life will not be dismissed in the cavalier manner that they were by former civil servant and now corporate executive, Mickey Cohen, when he stated: "Atlantic Canadians you are on your own".

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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NDP

Leonard William (Len) Taylor

New Democratic Party

Mr. Taylor:

Mr. Chairman, I very much appreciate the opportunity to speak here tonight. I want to state in this my first speech in this magnificent Chamber that I am proud to be a Canadian I am proud to be a New Democrat, but I am even prouder to be a representative of The Battlefords-Meadow Lake, a constituency in northwest Saskatchewan.

I am very happy, also, to be able to make a few remarks on what is probably the most important piece of legislation that has ever been talked about in this Chamber. It is described here on the Order Paper as: "Bill C-2, an Act to implement the Free Trade Agreement between Canada and the United States of America". It is legislation of a considerable number of pages, legislation not unlike the agreement itself.

Before I talk about this legislation, I want to make a few remarks about The Battlefords-Meadow Lake constituency and to thank the voters who gave me the opportunity to be here, the voters who placed their trust and confidence in me to carry their message to this Chamber, and to the other Members of Parliament herein.

The message I was sent here to discuss was one very much against this free trade legislation. In The Battlefords-Meadow Lake constituency the free trade legislation or the free trade deal was very much a single issue. I will speak tonight on behalf of the people who oppose this deal, and I will bring some of opposition to your attention, Madam Chairman, in a moment.

Throughout the riding and throughout the campaign I was told time and time again that the free trade deal

was bad for Saskatchewan and bad for the people of Canada. I was told too many times to count that this deal was being sold to an uninformed electorate by a Government without a single guarantee that what our grandparents and parents had worked for, in many cases fought for, would be protected for our future and for our children's future.

Elere we go again with new legislation, not much different from that introduced prior to the election. Still, after all of that discussion, argument, and expressed concern, there is no protection or guarantees despite hundreds of words from a very concerned population. Has this Government not listened to anything? Has this Government not listened to the people it claims to represent? Seniors, farmers, wage earners, Indian people, pensioners, small business people, service club representatives, members of church groups, the handicapped, and students in my riding, all Canadians, all intelligent, all concerned that the Government has ignored their concerns about the future of this great country.

The Battlefords-Meadow Lake constituency is an area made up of farmers, city and native people. It is a diverse economy with agriculture being the predominant nature of that constituency. These are very down to earth people, very intelligent, very caring individuals, all of whom have a great deal of concern for their friends, their neighbours, their family, their province, and their country.

Earlier this day the Minister, the Hon. Member for Brampton, talked about what the Government had done for farmers in Canada. I want to mention a couple of things in that regard. First, I want to bring to the attention of the House a letter that I received today from one of my constituents, a fellow who lives in Borden, Saskatchewan, right near the very eastern edge of the constituency of The Battlefords-Meadow Lake. He writes:

Dear Mr. Taylor;

First 1 would like to congratulate you for winning your seat in

Parliament. It is unfortunate in my opinion that the PCs won a

majority because I feel that this so-called free trade deal is going to

be detrimental to Canada.

This is an ordinary farm person speaking from his heart. I hope, Mr. Chairman, I do not have to listen to this noise. I did not go for supper tonight and get fed up like these people. I am getting fed up here in the House.

My constituent continues:

December 20, 1988

1 am certainly not against trade with the United States but 1 feel that this deal may have gone too far.

Members can cheer that because that is my feeling as well.

As a farmer I feel that our marketing boards are in danger because no matter how adequately the PCs claim to defend them, the Americans make no bones about wishing to dismantle them. This I believe began to become apparent in the recent GATT talks.

This is a good letter from one of my constituents. He goes on to say:

However even worse than the danger to certain segments of our economy is the over all danger of associating ourselves so closely with a country that is 10 times our size. We will be swallowed like a cat swallows a mouse.

The election campaign brought to my attention many things to which my friends and colleagues from the Alberta area should pay some attention. The leader of my party in Saskatchewan spent a lot of time in my constituency and spoke to many different groups. One of the stories he was relating to the people in my constituency referred to Alberta farmers, Alberta ranchers. This is the story: One rancher has 100 head of cattle on his ranch and another rancher has 10 head of cattle. The farmer with 100 head of cattle leans over the fence and says to his neighbour with 10 head of cattle: "Why don't we take down this fence and let our cattle share all this land?" I do not think there is a single Alberta rancher, if he had 10 head of cattle, that would tear down that fence and allow his neighbour with 100 head of cattle to go through his pasture and let the cows eat up all the grass that was there for his cattle. That is what this free trade is about. That is the sort of thing Americans are asking Canadians, with the 10 head of cattle, to do.

I would like to read some more from my constituent's letter. He writes:

I wish this free trade deal could be stopped. 1 don't think that it can, but at least I believe that it is going to have to be watched very closely to protect ourselves as Canadians.

Thank you for attention and good luck in your deliberations in Ottawa.

This letter comes from a person who I have never met before. It arrived in my mail today. It gives me the courage and stamina to stay here and talk to my friends across the way.

I also want to bring to the attention of the House an article that appeared in the newspaper this morning. Many Members will have read it already. It deals with a Canadian study that says that Canada lags far behind other countries in the export of items such as bread, cookies, and beer. This study was done by the Grains

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

2000 group. I do not know too much about it, but I believe that as long as we have free trade we will never be able to develop and continue those processing industries which use agricultural products to improve our agricultural industry and exports of agricultural products in Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Oh, oh!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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NDP

Ian Gardiner Waddell

New Democratic Party

Mr. Waddell:

Mr. Speaker, I have a point of order. I thought there was a tradition in this House that new members were given the courtesy of the House to complete their speeches. I would ask Hon. Members, including Ministers, to respect that tradition.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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NDP

Leonard William (Len) Taylor

New Democratic Party

Mr. Taylor:

I appreciate the interjection of my colleague, Mr. Chairman, unlike the interjection of Members opposite. I want to get back to the comments made this morning, because they were made in the context of this debate by the Member from Brampton who said that his Party had done so much for agriculture over the last four years.

First, our farm community, according to the 1986 census, is getting older, farms are getting bigger, and land is not worth as much as it was in 1984. Quite a number of things should be brought to the attention of this House, particularly as we look at the Province of Saskatchewan. We are talking about an increase of 35 per cent just in the last year in farm bankruptcies in the Province of Saskatchewan, the highest percentage in the Canadian context. We have farm income that although it is higher than ever is supported mostly by government payments because the price that is paid for the commodities on the international market, not supported by this Government, is down. The total net income of farmers right across the country has declined. In Saskatchewan it is some 47 per cent over the last few years. These things indicate that the farming sector, particularly in Saskatchewan, is not supported by this Government.

Between May 1987 and May 1988 the Canadian farm sector lost 24,000 jobs on the Prairies alone. The recent drought, the worst since the 1930s, scorched millions of acres of crop land and cattle range. This Government in the election campaign promised a drought relief program for the drought stricken farmers of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Alberta. They forgot to talk to their partners in cost sharing of this program, the provinces, and now the provinces are backing out and the program is in jeopardy. It did not consult with provincial counterparts before making a cost-shared promise during the election campaign.

December 20, 1988

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

The total farm debt in Canada has now reached a staggering $22 billion. The farming situation is so bad that most farmers now earn more off-farm income than on-farm income. One-third of all farm income is made from off-farm jobs as a consequence of the poor income situation on the farm.

On the other hand the New Democratic Party has provided a tremendous amount of encouragement to the farmers in Saskatchewan. That was evidenced by the recent election campaign. Certainly, the people of Saskatchewan indicated that the New Democratic Party was more trustworthy than the Government in place.

The New Democratic Party did support agriculture, and we do support the farm groups that oppose the free trade deal that we are discussing in this legislation.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

John Horton McDermid (Minister of State (Housing); Minister of State (International Trade))

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McDermid:

You do not support the Cattlemen's Association.

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Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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NDP

Leonard William (Len) Taylor

New Democratic Party

Mr. Taylor:

The family farm stabilization program that the New Democratic Party discussed during the election campaign is a program to assure farmers of a basic income for their production. It was a program designed to take the place of the current haphazard and ad hoc programs of the Government. This program ties the price to the U.S. target price so that the Canadian farmer is getting the same benefit on the world and international market as American counterparts, those same American counterparts whose organizations are threatening to destroy the marketing system that is selling that product on the international market.

According to an article in October the United States Wheat Board talked about the U.S. Government desiring to make the elimination of the Canadian Wheat Board one of its demands in the negotiations on agricultural reform.

The New Democratic Party also calls for a revamping of the Farm Credit Corporation, an overhaul that makes it a true farmers' bank and not a lending institution of last resort, as the Government has set it up. We also talked about tax fairness for farmers to ensure the restoration of Five year block averaging in recognition of fluctuating incomes on the farms.

We were also talking about funding to be provided for farm water, soil conservation research, and financial assistance for farmers to explore new conservation techniques or retire farmland for conservation purposes. A major problem in the near future will be the depletion

of the land in western Canada. That land which supports and nurtures the economy of western Canada is slowly being depleted. Something has to be done in conservation terms in order to protect it.

The free trade deal has been criticized in numerous editorials in western Canadian newspapers, by western Canadian editorial writers, and by people who have been heavily involved in the agriculture sector.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

Harvie Andre (Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Andre:

The Edmonton Journal was the only western newspaper.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
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NDP

Leonard William (Len) Taylor

New Democratic Party

Mr. Taylor:

I have quite a few here and I am prepared to read every one, if the House will indulge me. For example, the Canadian Wheat Board has an elected advisory committee. It is meant to provide advice to the Canadian Wheat Board to help its operations. That committee met and clearly discussed the implications of the Free Trade Agreement and the legislation on agriculture and on the Wheat Board. That committee strongly recommended that the Government not proceed with the agriculture sections of the free trade legislation, and that the Canadian Wheat Board was definitely in jeopardy as a result of the provisions included in this legislation. As a result, we strongly urge that changes be made in that one context alone.

The Saskatchewan Wheat Board delegates put forward a motion to support the proposed Canada- U.S. Free Trade Agreement, but in August withdrew that support because they had no assurances from the Government that the integrity of the Wheat Board as a sole marketing agent for Canadian wheat, oats, and barley would be protected.

We have lost the two-price system of wheat as a result of the deal. We have lost the freight rate on canola moving West. One plant has been lost in the City of Lloydminster. A canola crushing plant in the City of Lloydminster has announced that it will be closing. That is a direct result of the free trade deal. We in western Canada are finding that the implications of this deal on agriculture and on our economy are too great to support.

I urge that the House think strongly about the implications of this legislation, and about the implications of what it means to the future of the strongest economy that we have in western Canada. I urge Members to defeat the Bill in front of us. Let us return to the drawing board and put together some reasonable alternatives to trade fairly with the United States.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

René John Soetens

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Soetens:

Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to have the opportunity to address the House. I wish to thank the

December 20, 1988

people of the riding of Ontario who have given me the honour and privilege of being here to represent them, particularly on two points. First, they have sent me here to follow along on the fine tradition of the former Member for Ontario, Mr. Scott Fennell, the Government Whip. Now that I am here, I have often thought that the Government Whip is using the whip on the wrong side of the House. Perhaps in the future we can change that pattern.

Second, and the most important the reason I am excited about being here is that the people of the riding of Ontario granted me enough support that I can say that I stand here with support that almost equalled in total the vote received by the Right Hon. Member for Vancouver Quadra, and the Right Hon. Member for Oshawa, combined.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
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PC

John Horton McDermid (Minister of State (Housing); Minister of State (International Trade))

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McDermid:

You have a mandate.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
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PC

René John Soetens

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Soetens:

The riding of Ontario contains approximately 150,000 people. It is a very exciting riding. I would like to make sure that Members of the House are aware of the community I represent. There are three municipalities, Whitby, Ajax, and Pickering. Each is similar in size with approximately 50,000 population. It is a very young riding. There are many first-time home buyers. The population has doubled in the last seven years. Undoubtedly, with the growth that is taking place it will continue to grow and double in roughly seven to ten years.

It has a diverse economy, which is functioning very well, perhaps because of the economic policies established by the Government of the last four years. It is functioning so well that we are facing a shortage of serviced industrial land in the riding.

For example, unemployment is at such a low level that there are numerous jobs advertised for skilled and unskilled employees available in the riding of Ontario. Over the last year unemployment dropped to such a level that on several occasions it was not possible to record the level of activity.

Residential construction in the riding is at record levels with more than 4,000 housing starts per year during the last three years, and a projected similar ratio for the next two or three.

Housing is expensive, with prices starting at $130,000 for a 1,000 square foot home on a 30 by 100 foot lot.

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

Because of the number of people moving into the riding, there is tremendous upward pressure on house prices.

There is tremendous activity in the riding of Ontario in the commercial and industrial sectors, with both large plants and industries expanding. Industrial/commercial buildings of 4,000 to 40,000 and up to 400,000 square feet are being constructed. It is an exciting area in which to live, and an exciting area to represent here in Parliament.

There were numerous issues debated in the last election campaign. In fact, the Hon. Member for Vancouver Quadra in his opening comments raised a couple of those issues and I should like to take a couple of moments to deal with them now.

The Hon. Member for Vancouver Quadra, at page 122 of Hansard, is reported as having said:

We are granting American industry what is called under the agreement national treatment-national treatment in Canada for American institutions and American citizens, national treatment in goods and services and investments.

He went on to say:

That means Americans will be treated the same as Canadians when those Americans operate in Canada.

I do not know what is wrong with that. I would merely say: Thank goodness we didn't elect a Liberal Government, given the way past Liberal Governments have treated the business community. In the light of that record, Americans wouldn't want to be treated in the way in which Canadian industry was treated.

The Hon. Member for Vancouver Quadra went on to pose the question: What happens to our bright Canadian citizens, those who establish an industry, those who have incentives, those who have ideas and create an industry that is worth $10 million?

Yes, such an industry might be sold to an American firm. But, the difference is that, under a Progressive Conservative Government, that $10 million would probably be reinvested in Canada to create even more jobs. While the Right Hon. Leader of the Opposition doesn't appear to like that idea, I can tell you that it would be just great for Canada.

The election campaign did result in the return of a Progressive Conservative majority Government. In the riding of Ontario, the campaign was waged on several issues.

Many of the Liberal and NDP Members of this House have said that they were elected on the basis of their opposition to free trade. I can tell you that the

December 20, 1988

Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement

people of the riding of Ontario voted for fiscal responsibility, for leadership, for environmental policies, for the local candidate, for free trade, and other issues. More important, the people of the riding of Ontario voted for a future; they voted for a vision. It is because of that vote, and my personal convictions, that I rise today in support of the Bill to implement the Free Trade Agreement.

In the riding of Ontario, the impact of our currently operating trade agreement is evident everywhere. There are numerous large and small business reaping the benefits of the Auto Pact. And now with the FTA, all businesses will have the same opportunity-but not just in the riding of Ontario, and not just in the Province of Ontario, but in all of Canada.

In Ajax-Pickering, we have the Ajax-Pickering Board of Trade, representing in excess of 250 businesses, most of which are small and independently owned, and all of which have come out solidly in support of the Free Trade Agreement. Throughout my riding there are numerous businesses from many areas of endeavour which have taken a very public position in support of free trade.

To give Hon. Members an idea of the diversity of the industries operating in the riding of Ontario that support the Free Trade Agreement, let me provide you with a brief listing: plastic injection moulding companies; tool and die companies; paint manufacturers; chemical manufacturers; pharmaceutical manufacturers; steel companies, both primary producers and secondary fabricators; furniture manufacturers; polymer-resin companies; telecommunications antenna manufacturers; high frequency radio communications manufacturers; aircraft parts manufacturers; textile dyers and finishers; engineering firms that specialize in road and bridge construction; laboratory research equipment service companies; biotechnology engineering firms; printers; construction companies; lamp and lighting manufacturers; automotive manufacturers; automotive parts manufacturers; and home builders.

The foregoing list represents only a few of the many industries in the riding of Ontario which have publicly come out in support of the Free Trade Agreement. Suffice to say that the vast majority of the companies in the riding of Ontario, companies employing 2, or 20, or 200, or 2,000 people, and collectively employing over

20,000 people, support the FTA.

In my previous employment, I had occasion to travel throughout the states of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia,

Louisiana, and the Carolinas-all of those states about which the opposition Members in this place seem to be concerned. I have also had occasion to travel throughout Virginia, New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and other states of the United States. I have travelled throughout all of those states on business, selling goods produced by Canadian manufacturers, and I was able to do so successfully.

I have no hesitation in saying that we can compete successfully against U.S. manufacturers. There is nothing that the Americans have that we cannot deal with.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

René John Soetens

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Soetens:

While the preceding is sufficient reason for me to support the Free Trade Agreement, I also support it for what it can do for the rest of Canada. The riding of Ontario is but one of 295 ridings in Canada, just as the Province of Ontario is only one of 12 main parts of Canada when one includes the Territories.

When my parents brought the Soetens family to Canada from Holland, we started out in Nova Scotia. That was some 34, 35 years ago. It did not take very long for my parents to discover that there were no jobs available in Nova Scotia in my father's field of endeavour, in his area of expertise. As a result, we packed our bags and moved to Ontario. That was 33 years go.

It is that very tragedy of Canada that causes me to support the Free Trade Agreement. Today, many young men and women who wish to further their careers-or, in many instances, start their careers-are moving from the West or from the East to Ontario, leaving their homes, their families and their friends behind. Government support programs, many supported by the vibrant economy of the Province of Ontario, have not stopped that flow.

With eight of the ten provincial Premiers supporting this deal, with their collective hope that it will encourage more jobs at home, I am absolutely convinced that the old ways are simply not good enough any longer. The Canadian fabric and family are under great stress and strain, and the Free Trade Agreement will provide some relief. More important, it provides a future.

I should like to conclude by quoting the words of the Hon. Member from the riding adjacent to mine, the riding of Oshawa. I think it apropos the discussion we are having in this place. This is a quote from Hansard, and I direct it to the Members in opposition:

December 20, 1988

You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. Depart, 1 say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go-

I invite Hon. Members to vote for this Free Trade Agreement.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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PC

Marcel Danis (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

The Chairman:

The Hon. Member for Glengarry- Prescott-Russell.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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LIB

Don Boudria (Deputy Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Boudria:

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I am pleased this evening to have the opportunity to speak on the Free Trade Agreement. I want to give this Government a final opportunity to change its mind, to repent and spare the people of Canada-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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December 20, 1988