September 29, 1988

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS

PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis (Minister of State (Government House Leader); Minister of State (Treasury Board))

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Doug Lewis (Minister of State and Minister of State (Treasury Board)):

Mr. Speaker, I have two items to deal with today. First, I am pleased to table the Government's response to the twelfth report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts.

[Editor's Note: See Today's Votes and Proceedings.]

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNMENT RESPONSE TO TWELFTH REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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WAYS AND MEANS

PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis (Minister of State (Government House Leader); Minister of State (Treasury Board))

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Doug Lewis (Minister of State and Minister of State (Treasury Board)):

Pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 84(1), I have the honour to lay upon the Table copies of a Ways and Means Motion to amend the Income Tax Act.

Pursuant to the provisions of Standing Order 84(2), I ask that an Order of the Day be designated for the consideration of the said motion.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Sub-subtopic:   TABLING OF NOTICE OF MOTION
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UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES

PC

Henry Perrin Beatty (Minister of National Defence)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Perrin Beatty (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, 1 rise to report to this House with a great deal of pride the selection of the United Nations Peacekeeping Forces as recipient of the 1988 Nobel Peace Prize.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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PC

Henry Perrin Beatty (Minister of National Defence)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Beatty:

I am sure that all Members of the House will join me in expressing their pleasure at this announcement.

This prize has particularly special meaning for Canada. For many years peacekeeping has been accorded a prominent place in Canadian foreign and defence policy.

This Government has made peace and security one of the basic objectives which have framed our approach to the formation of Canadian domestic and international policy over the last four years. Indeed, peacekeeping was one of the primary goals identified for the Canadian Forces in the 1987 White Paper on National Defence.

The effective participation of Canadians Forces in virtually every United Nations peacekeeping operation since the Second World War has contributed directly to the easing of tensions in trouble spots around the world. If there is one thing for which Canada is held in high regard it is our support for the United Nations and for its peacekeeping efforts.

Canada has served on 11 separate UN peacekeeping missions from Korea to the Middle East to the Belgian Congo. We have participated in eight different U.N. truce supervisory or observer missions from Kashmir to Yemen to Lebanon. Finally, we have not restricted ourselves to UN operations alone but have also contributed our expertise to four other non-UN multilateral peacekeeping operations.

Our record is a proud one. Today, almost 2,000 Canadian Forces personnel serve around the world in a score of countries furthering international peace and goodwill. I have in the past indicated in this House and elsewhere that these dedicated officers and enlisted personnel deserve the unqualified support of all Canadians. Polls have indicated that most Canadians do indeed share this point of view.

Peacekeeping has long deserved the type of international recognition and support which today's Nobel Peace Prize announcement embodies. The UN's peacekeeping efforts in the past 40 years have finally received their just recognition, as have those nations, such as Canada, which have actively supported and contributed to such efforts.

Peacekeeping has a special place in Canadian hearts. I think I can say that we invented peacekeeping. Or, rather, the late Prime Minister Pearson invented peacekeeping. For his pivotal role in seeking the peaceful resolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict of 1956 Mr. Pearson was justifiably awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Today's announcement is a second Nobel Prize involving Canada and its peacekeeping efforts. I join all Canadians in extending our congratulations and our best wishes to our peacekeeping forces around the world. Their job is difficult and dangerous. But their dedication over decades has done much to further the cause of peace in the world.

September 29, 1988

Statements by Ministers

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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LIB

Herbert Eser (Herb) Gray (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Herb Gray (Windsor West):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of the Official Opposition to say how pleased we are to see that the Nobel Prize Committee has awarded this year's Peace Prize to UN peacekeepers.

[DOT] (M10)

Canada plays a special role when it comes to the concept of peacekeeping. I think it is clear-and history records this- that this very concept was something created by a Canadian. The late Right Hon. Lester Pearson, when he was Secretary of State for External Affairs in the Government of Louis St. Laurent, at that time convinced the United Nations to establish a force made up of troops of member countries, including Canada, in a way which resolved the Suez crisis of 1956. As a result, Mike Pearson received the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1957.

It occurred to me that it might be said that the awarding of this year's Nobel Prize for Peace to UN peacekeepers is almost like the award of a second Nobel Prize to Mike Pearson, because the award announced today is a confirmation of how important, how valid, and how successful the concept that Mike Pearson developed in 1956 has proven to be over the years.

This award is a tribute, certainly, to the troops of the member countries who have participated and are participating in UN peacekeeping operations around the world, and Canadians have proudly played a leading role in all such forces since their inception. They played an important role with the force created to resolve the Suez crisis, and they are playing an important role today in maintaining the truce which has ended the gulf war between Iran and Iraq.

This award is indirectly a tribute to the Secretary General of the United Nations, Javier Perez de Cuellar and his staff, for their work in bringing about the truce in the gulf war and generally in doing more than has been done for quite a few years in advancing the role of the United Nations in resolving conflicts and preventing them from breaking out into world wars of a scope which has caused such destruction all too often in the past hundred years.

If this award is a tribute to the Secretary General of the United Nations, it is also in recognition of the importance of the United Nations itself in helping to maintain an atmosphere of peace and security in the world. I know that all Canadians are very pleased to find that the peacekeepers of the United Nations have been awarded this year's Nobel Prize.

This is not the first time that UN agencies have been awarded the Nobel Prize, but certainly, because of the role of a Canadian, Mike Pearson, in creating the concept of peacekeeping by the UN, and also because of the role of Canadian troops in all United Nations peacekeeping operations, Canadians, I am sure take great satisfaction in this year's Nobel Prize for Peace.

I conclude by again stating how delighted we are in the Official Opposition that this award has been given to the

Peacekeeping Forces of the United Nations, and I am sure that all Canadians are delighted in the same way and extend their warm congratulations to all those participating in United Nations peacekeeping operations, the forces of Canada and the forces of the many other member nations of the United Nations who are doing so much to justify this Nobel Prize for Peace.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleagues in the New Democratic Party, I would like to join with the Minister and the spokesman for the Official Opposition in congratulating the United Nations Peacekeeping Forces on being recipients of this year's Nobel Peace Prize. I think it is particularly appropriate when we know that over the years this Nobel Peace Prize tends to go to individuals, which is understandable. But the fact remains that over those same years there have been many, many individuals unrecognized in this special way who have been keeping the peace on the ground, where it counts.

We know that over-all, between 1947 and 1988, more than 80,000 Canadian servicemen and servicewomen have participated in 15 peace-restoring, peacekeeping, and truce supervisory operations mounted by the United Nations, and in three truce supervisory or observer missions conducted outside the UN framework.

In 1988, this very year alone, over 1,400 Canadian Forces personnel participated in international peacekeeping forces and observer missions. I am also told that since Korea 79 Canadians have died while serving in peacekeeping forces, something which many Canadians may not know.

What we are recognizing or what has been recognized today in the awarding of this Nobel Peace Prize is the terribly significant and sometimes dangerous role that many Canadians have played, as I said before, on the ground or on the line, literally, in some cases.

I had the opportunity to visit the Green Line in Nicosia, as I am sure the Ministers have had the opportunity to do so, and on a day-to-day basis Canadians there are put in a position where they sometimes have to confront people who are threatening or actually moving into territory that they should not be moving into, and these Canadians put themselves in a very vulnerable position.

That is the kind of real peacekeeping we are recognizing here today. I can say, as has been indicated by previous comments, that the peacekeeping role that Canada has played all these years is something that all Canadians agree on and with. We may disagree with the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Beatty) on nuclear submarines and on first-use policy of NATO or Cruise missile testing, or whatever the case may be, but I think there is consensus on Canadian defence and foreign policy on the role of the Canadian Armed Forces and being available to the world for these kinds of peacekeeping operations.

September 29, 1988

We need to ask ourselves, 1 suppose, the larger question of how we keep the peace, not just between smaller countries who are fighting but between the superpowers, and that is where the debate enjoins with the Government.

For the moment, let us all come together and rejoice in the fact that the work that many Canadian men and women have done over the years in peacekeeping operations has been duly and honourably recognized.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   SELECTION FOR NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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ACID RAIN

PC

Stan Darling

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the first report of the Special Committee on Acid Rain to which, pursuant to Standing Order 99(2), the committee requests a comprehensive response.

I would like to point out to the House that the report that I am presenting this morning is the accumulation of work done by a group of Members from all three Parties. Acid rain is a killer, and we must all work together to prevent any further damage in order to give our children's children the Canada they deserve. This is a good step forward. Some hope has been restored.

1 am sure, Mr. Speaker, that you as a former Minister of the Environment will be very, very interested in this report, because I am well aware of your grave concern as well.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ACID RAIN
Sub-subtopic:   PRESENTATION OF FIRST REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

[Editor's Note: See today's Votes and Proceedings ]

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   ACID RAIN
Sub-subtopic:   PRESENTATION OF FIRST REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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PETITIONS

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present a petition signed by people in my riding, but also elsewhere in Winnipeg, who are concerned about the whole matter of schizophrenia as a major illness in Canada, affecting about 1 per cent of the population and causing severe mental anguish and suffering to the patients and their relatives, and costing Canadian society more than $3 billion annually in direct health care and other support costs.

The petitioners state that recent research findings, including those obtained in Canada, have shown the illness to be a

Petitions

biochemical brain disorder in part caused by genetic malfunction. Schizophrenic patients, their relatives and friends, desperately hope that a cure and method of prevention can be found as soon as possible through larger research efforts dedicated to schizophrenia.

The petitioners further state that the research effort in Canada dedicated to schizophrenia is extremely limited and not commensurate with the burden that the illness imposes upon Canadians.

Therefore, the petitioners call upon Parliament to ensure that research efforts related to schizophrenia will, in the future, be commensurate with the seriousness of this illness in Canada.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR RESEARCH INTO SCHIZOPHRENIA
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PC

Jean-Guy Hudon (Parliamentary Secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jean-Guy Hudon (Parliamentary Secretary to Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, in my riding, there is a very active environmental group that wants to present a petition. This group is called Les amis des arbres or "Tree Lovers Coalition". These people ask us to fight pollution, to support local initiatives, to consult the population and to support them, even financially.

Mr. Speaker, what is interesting about this group led by Phillip Norton is that it deals with little things. By dealing with all these little things, we will fight pollution and this ties in very well with what my colleague just said.

So I am pleased, on behalf of the people of Valleyfield, Franklin, Beauharnois, etc., to present this petition.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT
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NDP

Cyril Keeper

New Democratic Party

Mr. Cyril Keeper (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I have two petitions on what is probably the last full day of Parliament before we enter an election.

The first petition indicates that, on June 12, 1988, when the South Moresby Park Agreement was signed, the federal Government committed itself to spending $20 million or more to explore for hydrocarbons in the South Moresby Marine Park.

The Queen Charlotte region has higher earthquake activity than the San Andreas fault, and the Hecate Strait has among the roughest and most unpredictable seas in the world.

The undersigned petitioners state that they do not want any more hydrocarbon exploration activities to take place in their coastal waters, nor do the petitioners want the Government to pay for any such activities from this day on. This petition was circulated by the Greenpeace organization.

September 29, 1988

Questions on the Order Paper DEPORTATION FROM CANADA OF SALLY ESPINELI

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   SOUTH MORESBY PARK-HYDROCARBON EXPLORATION
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NDP

Cyril Keeper

New Democratic Party

Mr. Cyril Keeper (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, my second petition concerns Sally Espineli a Filipino woman from Winnipeg who was discriminated against on the basis of her marital status. The Human Rights Commission made a special appeal to the Minister of Immigration (Mrs. McDou-gall) to allow Miss Espineli to remain in Canada until her human rights complaint had been heard. Nonetheless, Espineli was deported on August 31, 1988.

The undersigned petitioners humbly pray and call upon Parliament to instruct the Government, through the Minister of Immigration, to bring Sally Espineli back to Canada in order that the Human Rights Commission can hear her case in person.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   SOUTH MORESBY PARK-HYDROCARBON EXPLORATION
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September 29, 1988