September 28, 1988

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

TRIBUTE TO MADAME THERESE KILLENS

LIB

Lucie Pépin

Liberal

Mrs. Lucie Pepin (Outremont):

Mr. Speaker, if the rumours we are hearing are true, the Thirty-third Parliament will be dissolved in a matter of days. Twenty-seven women out of a total of 282 Members were elected to the House of Commons.

I rise today to pay tribute to three of my colleagues who will be leaving this House shortly. 1 speak of Madam Therese Killens, the Hon. Pat Carney, and Miss Pauline Jewett. All three have played a very important role in leading the women of this country into public life. Their insight and intelligence have helped in the formulation of policy and legislation, and the fair and lucid critique of legislation once formulated. [Translation]

Therese Killens was dedicated to the cause of the disabled and the homeless. She did not make a lot of noise, but we remember her for her effectiveness and for what she accomplished in the area of pensions for women working in the home. [English]

Pauline Jewett will be remembered for her work in both judicial committees and constitutional committees. At a time when women managed to mobilize their forces to entrench the basic right to equality in the Constitution, it was noteworthy that women such as Pauline Jewett provided courage, strength, and inspiration.

Pat Carney, who was at the forefront of one of the most important debates facing the country, should also be lauded for her ability to hold her own and be fair, for her ability to voice her opinion and to be heard, as well as for her ability to listen.

To all of these women I wish good luck in their future endeavours. As a recent arrival in politics, 1 also extend my many thanks.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   TRIBUTE TO MADAME THERESE KILLENS
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HUMAN RIGHTS

PC

Robert Pennock

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bob Pennock (Etobicoke North):

Mr. Speaker, the protection of its citizens is a valued right in any country. In this regard concern is being expressed by Canadians and an international human rights organization about the plight of a Canadian citizen, a resident of Etobicoke North. I refer to Balkar Singh in detention in India since November 2, 1987.

The renowned international organization, Amnesty International, in a report last month urged the Indian Government to release him or charge him, and bring him to trial under normal judicial procedures, with all customary legal safeguards.

While recognizing the efforts of the Government to obtain consular access to the detainee to ensure adequate medical treatment and cessation of torture, I would like Members to join with me in urging the Indian Government to bring Balkar Singh to trial at the earliest opportunity, and urge the Government of Canada to continue in its worthy efforts to bring the matter to an early resolve.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   INDIA-PLIGHT OF DETAINED CANADIAN CITIZEN
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THE LATE GEORGE GRANT

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, Canada has lost one of its best patriots and best philosophers in the death of George Grant.

The man who wrote Lament for a Nation in 1965, lamenting the capitulation of Canadian identity and values to American pressure, is now to be lamented for himself by many Canadians who saw and heard in George Grant and his writings someone who understood what Canada had been about, and what we could be if we resist rather than give in to the temptation of continentalism, the American technological ethos, and the poverty of spirit that lies at the root of advanced liberal capitalism.

George Grant was one who understood the modern mind, who could discern and explore the moral fault lines and crevices of what the modern mind takes for granted as objective reality, but which is really no more than a collectively held uncritical belief.

September 28, 1988

In his books, Technology and Empire, English-Speaking Justice and Technology and Justice, he has given us a warning, too often unheeded, about the new tyranny that we court by turning our backs on the best of our philosophical and political traditions.

If the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement goes through, George Grant will have been spared from the final assault on the Canada he loved. If it does not, perhaps there is yet time to recover and play reveille for a country saved and a philosopher vindicated.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE LATE GEORGE GRANT
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ROYAL CANADIAN MINT

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, the Royal Canadian Mint enjoys a proud reputation as one of the foremost producers of high quality precious metal coins in the entire world. Maple Leaf gold coins are sought out by coin collectors, investors, and those looking for a secure store of value.

Canada is a major producer of platinum, so it is only natural that we should also get into the platinum coin business.

Last Thursday's special striking ceremony initiating the production of platinum Maple Leaf coins, marks, I am sure, the start of what will be another highly successful venture by the Royal Canadian Mint.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MINT
Sub-subtopic:   PLATINUM MAPLE LEAF COINS
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN MINT
Sub-subtopic:   PLATINUM MAPLE LEAF COINS
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POLITICAL PARTIES

LIB

Jean-Claude Malépart

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Claude Malepart (Montreal-Sainte-Marie):

Mr. Speaker, this morning the Leader of the Official Opposition (Mr. Turner) our future Prime Minister after the election, announced with pride the platform of the Liberal Party with respect to the environment, quality of life and professional ethics. What 1 find particularly heartening is that the future Liberal Government will correct the injustice to the elderly and families on middle and low incomes perpetrated by the Conservative Government.

Mr. Speaker, this morning I was proud to join the Leader of the Liberal Party in announcing the forty objectives of our Liberal vision. The people will have to choose between a sleazy, dishonest Conservative Government and an honest Liberal Government.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   THE LIBERAL OUTLOOK
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CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT-POSITION OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

PC

Rob Nicholson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rob Nicholson (Niagara Falls):

Mr. Speaker, the other night I was surprised and disappointed to hear the Right Hon. Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) state that Canada's ability to protect its environment is somehow threatened by the free trade agreement. That is a bunch of nonsense.

For the Leader of the Opposition's benefit, let me refer to the agreement:

Import and export control measures can be justified when it is "necessary to protect human, animal or plant life or health (such as measures to protect the environment or endangered species)".

Instead of trying to scare people, why doesn't he start listening to B.C. Liberal Senator George Van Roggen, former Liberal cabinet Minister Gerald Reagan, the Liberal Premier of New Brunswick, the Liberal Premier of Quebec, and countless other Liberals who agree that this agreement is good for Canada? Otherwise I think it is going to be very bad for the Liberal Party.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES FREE TRADE AGREEMENT-POSITION OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT

NDP

Marion Dewar

New Democratic Party

Mrs. Marion Dewar (Hamilton Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, last June the Federal Court of Canada ruled that the Unemployment Insurance Act was unfair to natural parents because it denied them the benefits for child care enjoyed by adoptive parents.

This decision makes a clear distinction between maternity benefits, which are received by women for health reasons, and parental benefits, which are paid to adoptive parents for the child's care and emotional development.

The Conservative Government has until September 30 to appeal this decision, if it wishes to take such a retrograde step. New Democrats hope that instead the Government will listen to groups such as the Canadian Labour Congress, the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women, and the National Association of Women and the Law, and accept the ruling by implementing parental leave for Canadian parents without jeopardizing maternity leave benefits.

September 28, 1988

This move will finally ensure that Canada provides child care benefits already available in other industrialized countries.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT
Sub-subtopic:   DAY CARE BENEFITS-FEDERAL COURT DECISION
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POLITICAL PARTIES

PC

Mary Collins

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Mary Collins (Capilano):

Mr. Speaker, so the Liberals are starting to unveil their election promises and their Leader says that they would not proceed with sales tax reform. They would instead tinker with the present 12 per cent manufacturers' sales tax, perpetuating its unfairness, continuing to disadvantage our domestic manufacturers.

Perhaps the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) should check with the members of his Party who sit on the Finance Committee with me and have shown considerable interest in substantial sales tax reform. But splits on Party policy are not new to the Liberal Party.

Of course, what else could we expect from the Liberal Leader, who, when he was Minister of Finance in the 1970s, was the "Father of the Deficit", raising expenditures nearly 30 per cent per year without increasing revenues, starting the inflationary spiral which led to the recession earlier this decade.

Once again the Liberals have shown that they are the Party of the past, with policies to hurt exporters, to kill jobs. Old ways, old times-Canadians will not be fooled. They want, they demand better.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   POLITICAL PARTIES
Sub-subtopic:   SALES TAX REFORM-POSITION OF LIBERAL PARTY
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EDUCATION

LIB

David Charles Dingwall

Liberal

Mr. Dave Dingwall (Cape Breton-East Richmond):

Mr. Speaker, education ought to be a priority for all Governments. We on this side of the House place a high regard on the educational institutions in our country. We also have an understanding of the financial sacrifices that students must make while studying at a post-secondary institution.

It was with some dismay that I learned that the Government taxes graduate scholarships. Recently I received a letter from a graduate student in Sudbury, Ontario, who had received a $9,000 scholarship for her studies in 1987-88. When she completed her tax return she found that she had to pay $2,000 in taxes. Mr. Speaker, this is unjust. The Government should encourage academic excellence in our youth. This can only benefit the country as a whole. To turn around and tax the

very moneys students are using to upgrade themselves is absolutely ridiculous.

Under this Government we have seen the most substantial tax increases in Canadian history. The problem is that the wrong people are the ones targeted to pay taxes. Why tax a student bursary, and not the 60,000 profitable companies that each year pay no taxes, or the 5,220 taxpayers who made over $50,000 last year and paid no tax, or the 40 people who made over $250,000 last year and paid no tax?

It is time for the Government of Canada to take students into consideration. It is time for the Government to call an election so the people of Canada can have a choice to make in the next election.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   EDUCATION
Sub-subtopic:   TAXATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS
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September 28, 1988