December 9, 1987

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21

ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE

LIB

Lucie Pépin

Liberal

Mrs. Lucie Pepin (Outremont):

Mr. Speaker, on Monday, December 7, 1987 in Montreal, Mrs. Irene Joly was killed by her ex-husband, a Mr. Dupre, who was arrested and jailed several hours later. In January 1986, Mrs. Joly had been stabbed several times by her ex-husband but survived, thanks to the unexpected arrival of her daughter. Her ex-husband received a suspended sentence, although the Crown prosecutor demanded a prison sentence. Since that time, Mr. Dupre had been following and harassing his ex-wife and her children. The court ignored the prosecutor's request for an order preventing the ex-husband from getting closer than 1,000 feet to his victim. For six months, her son drove her to work because he was afraid his mother would get hurt. Last Monday, Mrs. Joly was attacked and killed by her ex-husband.

Mr. Speaker, the law must be changed to make a death threat a criminal offence. At the present time, the police cannot do more than they are already doing because threatening to kill someone, however serious the threat may be, is not recognized as a serious offence. I want to ask the Government to act quickly, because I may remind the House that this is the second woman killed by her ex-husband in the past six months. Perhaps it would help reduce violence in the family and make ex-husbands realize their wives are not their personal property and that even if they leave their husbands, that is no reason to kill them.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR AMENDMENT OF LAW TO MAKE DEATH THREAT A CRIMINAL OFFENCE
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REFUGEES

PC

Pauline Browes (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment)

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Pauline Browes (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of the Environment):

Mr. Speaker, four months ago the Government introduced legislation that will make our refugee determination system faster and fairer. For four months that legislation has been held up by both opposition Parties and now by the Senate. It is time for action.

Thirty thousand people are expected to come to Canada this year and file refugee claims. Even though 70 per cent of those claims will be groundless, each case could take months and years to decide. Our present refugee system is inefficient, inadequate and inappropriate.

Canadians want and deserve a refugee determination process that treats all claimants fairly and promptly. The measures introduced last August will do just that.

Are the opposition Parties waiting for another boatload of people to arrive on our shores before realizing the necessity of changing our system? Or will they join with us and the majority of Canadians who recognize that it is time to take action and put the policy introduced by the Minister of Employment and Immigration (Mr. Bouchard) in place now? Canadians and needy refugees around the world can wait no longer.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   REFUGEES
Sub-subtopic:   SENATE DELAY IN PASSING LEGISLATION
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TAX REFORM

NDP

John Edmund Parry

New Democratic Party

Mr. John Parry (Kenora-Rainy River):

Mr. Speaker, Canadians living in northern regions are very concerned over the plans of the Minister of Finance (Mr. Wilson) for flowthrough shares.

New Democrats realize flow-through shares have done much to alleviate a key problem in the mining industry, namely, the difficulties small companies have in raising capital for mineral exploration. Clearly there has been a very significant increase in activity and this has had the effect of creating many new jobs in regions of high unemployment.

Speaking in Noranda-Rouyn on September 24, our Leader, the Hon. Member for Oshawa (Mr. Broadbent), said:

December 9, 1987

This fiscal measure corresponds well to the objectives of my Party in terms of the creation of jobs and the development of resource-based regions.

We do have some concerns with the existing system. [Translation]

More specifically, we want to channel the benefits to small businesses which always have trouble raising investment capital.

Actually, the corporate tax system is supposed to help capitalize small businesses which are the foundation of economic renewal and job creation in our regions.

It is vital that flow-through shares be retained in order to ensure an active mining sector which is one of the key pillars of regional development throughout northern Canada.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   TAX REFORM
Sub-subtopic:   FLOW-THROUGH SHARES-CALL FOR RETENTION
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THE ECONOMY

PC

Guy St-Julien

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Guy St-Julien (Abitibi):

Mr. Speaker, the Abitibi-Temiscamingue region is still breaking records for the number of residents employed and the number of unemployed in the area.

The unemployment rate is the lowest in the entire province of Quebec. It was 6.7 per cent in November 1987, which is 0.7 per cent less then it was in October.

That is a striking departure from the unemployment rates we had under the former Liberal Government in this country, when employment was as high as 27, 24 and 20 per cent from 1980 to 1984.

Mr. Speaker, the unemployment rate continues to drop in Abitibi-Temiscamingue, thanks to the concerted efforts of our entrepreneurs and employees in the private sector and federal and provincial programs.

I want to thank the people of Abitibi for their participation and their faith in the economic renewal of our region.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   SITUATION IN ABITIBI-TEMISCAMINGUE REGION
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LABOUR RELATIONS

LIB

David Charles Dingwall

Liberal

Mr. Dave Dingwall (Cape Breton-East Richmond):

Mr. Speaker, the closure of the Route Canada terminal in Sydney and the subsequent lay-off of 17 employees will hurt not only the workers but the community at large. The hardships that

these employees will now face is one of extreme proportion. This workforce is a very senior one and its years of service range from 16 to 46 of dedicated and faithful work to the employer.

The severance package will be pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Labour Code and not the special agreement which was consummated by the Canadian National Railway company, Transport Canada, Route Canada, and the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers. The special agreement provided many more benefits to the workers than what is being offered under the Canada Labour Code.

The activity by senior management of Route Canada in this matter is prejudicial to the workers involved. Where is the justice in this situation? Where is the obligation this company has to years of dedicated service by its employees? This situation is not acceptable. Route Canada managers and the corporation as a whole will just have to do better if they wish to operate in eastern Canada.

We are not in the stone age of labour relations, Mr. Speaker. In coming weeks I intend to point this out again and again to Route Canada management. It is time that it took its responsibilities seriously on behalf of the workers who have now been affected.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR RELATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CLOSURE OF ROUTE CANADA TERMINAL IN SYDNEY- TREATMENT OF WORKERS
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CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-POSITION OF TORONTO BOARD OF TRADE

PC

William Lesick

Progressive Conservative

Mr. William G. Lesick (Edmonton East):

Mr. Speaker, free trade with the United States has the potential to reap great dividends for Canada and we in Alberta support it unequivocally. But just so that Canadians and particularly those from the great Province of Ontario are not confused into believing that Premier Peterson, in opposing the deal, speaks for everyone, I would like to bring to the attention of Hon. Members the views of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto, an organization with over 15,000 members, the largest community Board of Trade or Chamber of Commerce in all of North America.

In a submission to the House Standing Committee, the board stated:

-rising U.S. protectionism has obliged the federal Government to secure

and enhance Canadian access to that export market upon which Canada is .. .

most dependent for its continued prosperity.

The board went on to say that failure to realize an agreement could pose a threat to national unity.

Is it not interesting how the Ontario Government can claim to have won its mandate by opposing the free trade agreement

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December 9, 1987

when it does not have the support of so large a sector of its business community and all the workers who work within it?

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-POSITION OF TORONTO BOARD OF TRADE
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REFUGEES

NDP

Daniel James Macdonnell Heap

New Democratic Party

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Mr. Speaker, The Globe and Mail reports that the Minister of Employment and Immigration (Mr. Bouchard) may make amendments to Bill C-84, amendments he absolutely refused during weeks of debate in Parliament and committee. If he is beginning to wake up, that's good. However, he'll need to go much further than reported.

His Bill will surely fail at the Supreme Court as long as it makes criminals of Canadians who help a refugee without a visa to come to an immigration office in Canada; allows immigration officers to break and enter, search, and seize documents at will; detains new arrivals on mere Minister's suspicion, without habeas corpus rights, and violates Canada's signature on the UN Convention for Refugees by turning refugee ships away at sea.

The Minister must back down still further.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   REFUGEES
Sub-subtopic:   BILL C-84-NEED FOR FURTHER AMENDMENTS
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THE ADMINISTRATION

PC

Marcel R. Tremblay

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Marcel Tremblay (Quebec-Est):

Mr. Speaker, the month of December gives me pause to reflect upon peace and what is happening in foreign countries where Christmas this year will be marred by violence, where people will suffer and cry.

Here is what we Canadians have achieved in 1987 after only three years under a Progressive Conservative Government: social peace throughout the country, joy of living, reconciliation of all Canadians from coast to coast, leadership highlighted by humanism and based on the individual's sense of responsibility and valorization.

Mr. Speaker, Canadians are now proud of themselves and their Government because they feel useful and responsible. They have confidence in their Prime Minister, and justifiably so.

Over a number of years the Liberal Party drew inspiration from the NDP in its quest for socialist order in Canada. As a result, Canadians sank $200 billion deeper into debt, they lost their self-confidence, and they now live in a climate of mistrust

where aggressivity between individuals and cultural and economic interest groups prevails.

Mr. Speaker, it is my fervent wish that 1988 will enable countries torn by war and misery to establish institutions, policies and governments whose inspirational spirit will resemble that of the administration now headed by the Prime Minister of Canada, the Right Hon. Brian Mulroney.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT AS MODEL FOR WORLD
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AEROSPACE

LIB

Jean-Robert Gauthier (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Robert Gauthier (Ottawa-Vanier):

Mr. Speaker, the Government has earmarked $824 million for the space research program. This is not new money, but funds recycled from the appropriations of the National Research Council which, as we have seen this week, is seeking applicants for jobs with the famous space agency-yet we still have no idea as to where the agency is to be located.

Reading newspapers in recent days made me appreciate just why the Prime Minister simply cannot make up his own mind. On September 16 the Minister of State for Science and Technology stated that this essentially political decision rests with the Prime Minister.

Today's Le Droit reports that the same Minister is saying: "Decision not made yet". As we recall, the Minister of State for Science and Technology stated: "Within a few weeks".

We know that even the Minister of State told us: "No, no, never ever. The decision will not be made by tomorrow"!

Well, when will this Government have the nerve to tell us: The Space Agency-in Ottawa or in Montreal? Or half in Ottawa and half in Montreal? Where will it be located? Somewhere in limbo? Do something, you guys! This means jobs in my riding, in the national capital.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   AEROSPACE
Sub-subtopic:   SITE OF FUTURE SPACE AGENCY
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HUMAN RIGHTS

December 9, 1987