December 2, 1987

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21

EFFECT OF CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT

?

Hon. Chas. L. Caccia@Davenport

Mr. Speaker, what is the price we will have to pay for the so-called free trade agreement? It could be staggering. First there will be job losses. No one knows the exact number but some estimates run as high as 500,000 jobs, as indicated by the Minister of Employment and Immigration (Mr. Bouchard) himself. We will then lose our ability to shape our own economy and to develop our own economic, social and environmental policies.

In the case of energy, we give the United States guaranteed access to our resources without getting guaranteed access to U.S. resources. Furthermore, we will give away the power to set our own prices for our own energy. Our own decision making powers in energy matters will be seriously diminished. Of course, these conclusions are based on the information available so far. Believe it or not, Mr. Speaker, we have not yet seen the final text of the trade agreement.

There is, of course, an alternative. We could liberalize trade between provinces and liberalize trade internationally, not just in North America. We are better suited for an international trade policy. We must reverse the decline in Canadian trade with other parts of the world. What we want first and foremost is not to give away our ability to determine the future we want for this and future generations of Canadians.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   EFFECT OF CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

PC

Léo Duguay

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Leo Duguay (St. Boniface):

Mr. Speaker, last week the Minister of State for Science and Technology (Mr. Oberle)

and I officially opened the Canadian Institute of Industrial Technology in Winnipeg-a world-class show piece-federal Government, universities, and the private sector working together-a new era of computer integrated manufacturing and industrial technology.

Almost since its inception, nattering nabobs of negativism have been hounding the institute. First they predicted the $26 million project would be cancelled. When that did not happen they predicted the Government would build it and then sell it. When the centre was completed and open for business in early 1986, the critics began describing it as a white elephant, then as an empty or half empty building.

Well, Mr. Speaker, last week a miracle occurred. Critics finally got the message that 40 per cent empty is 60 per cent full. In a year, organizations will be on a waiting list to grab up the little remaining space. Nattering nabobs of negativism, go to your graves!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Sub-subtopic:   OFFICIAL OPENING OF CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY IN WINNIPEG
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS

NDP

Neil Young

New Democratic Party

Mr. Neil Young (Beaches):

Can you imagine, Mr. Speaker, the Government of Egypt selling off the Pyramids, the Chinese people placing the Great Wall on the auction block, or the Eiffel Tower turned over to the private sector? Only in Canada we say "sell the CN Tower"! And what is the CN Tower to be called; Alpo Dog Food Heights, Loblaws Skyscraper, Pizza Pizza Peak or perhaps Ronald Reagan Lookout?

I find it astounding that the Minister of Transport (Mr. Crosbie) measures the value of a structure by whether or not it can go choo-choo-chooing along. The CN Tower doesn't do that, but then, again, it's never late.

The Tower was built with $57 million of Canadian money. It does serve 15 media centres. It does accommodate two million visitors a year, and it does bring a sense of pride to Canadians. All of this, and the Tower turned a tidy $5 million profit last year.

If the Government insists on bequeathing the CN Tower to the private sector, it should at least attempt to secure a guarantee that the purchaser will find a small place for the Government's epitaph to be displayed for all Canadians to see.

December 2, 1987

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSED SALE OF CN TOWER
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PORNOGRAPHY

PC

Rob Nicholson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rob Nicholson (Niagara Falls):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to support Bill C-54, an Act to control pornography in Canada. I urge all Members of this House to pass it as quickly as possible and send the legislation to committee.

Not a week goes by that someone from my riding of Niagara Falls does not write to me to urge quick passage of this legislation. They know that the present provisions governing pornography in the Criminal Code are so vague as to be almost unenforceable. Pornography has become a gigantic industry, one that exploits and degrades people, particularly women and children.

I reject comments from groups who say that the definition of pornography is too restrictive. I challenge them to appear before our committee and suggest a better definition. I believe that is only fair.

In the meantime, people everywhere are getting tired of those individuals who continuously want to postpone a crackdown on pornography. As it relates to this piece of legislation I am determined that that will not happen.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   PORNOGRAPHY
Sub-subtopic:   PASSAGE OF LEGISLATION URGED
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REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

LIB

Jean-Claude Malépart

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Claude Malepart (Montreal-Sainte-Marie):

Mr. Speaker, after fifteen months the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion and Minister of State for Science and Technology has decided to respond to the Picard Report's eighty-six recommendations this morning in Montreal. The people of Montreal were expecting concrete proposals but unfortunately, the Minister's response was just a lot of bluffing. I would like to know, and so would the people of Montreal, why the Minister failed to announce the establishment of a space agency in Montreal. Why didn't the Minister announce that a real banking centre would be set up in Montreal? Why didn't the Minister announce that $130 million would be provided to fund development of the Old Port in Montreal, as was done in the case of other Canadian cities? Why didn't the Minister announce that $25 million would be made available to the Montreal East development board? And finally, Mr. Speaker, why didn't the Minister announce that jobs would be created in Montreal East? I repeat, after fifteen months, this morning the Minister of Regional Industrial

Expansion failed to provide the people of Montreal with anything tangible.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Sub-subtopic:   MONTREAL EAST END-GOVERNMENT POSITION
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WELFARE

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, the just published report of the National Council of Welfare which provides advice to the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Epp) is appropriately entitled "Welfare in Canada-The Tangled Safety Net".

It points out that the current social assistance system, although it has some good points, very often reinforces poverty and engenders continued dependence upon welfare. People can get caught in the net rather than being saved by it. The report addresses issues such as simplification, accessibility, equity, adequacy, and due process.

The House of Commons Standing Committee on National Health and Welfare ought to make a thorough study of the report to see which of its recommendations might successfully be implemented.

* * v

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   WELFARE
Sub-subtopic:   NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WELFARE-SUGGESTED COMMITTEE STUDY OF REPORT
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INDUSTRY

NDP

Victor Fredrich (Vic) Althouse

New Democratic Party

Mr. Vic Althouse (Humboldt-Lake Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) of the pledge he made to the grape growers of the Niagara Peninsula when he was campaigning during the 1984 election campaign.

During that campaign the Prime Minister vowed to 'revitalize the industry and keep our farmers farming". He said that the wine industry was "in a state of crisis caused in great part by the unfair trade practices of offshore wine producers". Then he vowed that a Conservative Government would promote Canadian wines and related products and adopt other protective measures because that would be "far less costly to the public treasury than to allow this vital Niagara industry to literally wither on the vine".

If the free trade deal goes through, the wine industry will wither on the vine. The Prime Minister who promised to protect the industry, who had a clear mandate to protect it, has instead betrayed it.

December 2, 1987

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   WINE INDUSTRY-ELECTION PROMISE
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FREE TRADE

PC

Gabriel Fontaine (Chief Government Whip's assistant; Deputy Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gabriel Fontaine (Levis):

Mr. Speaker, members of the Union des producteurs agricoles are having a convention in Quebec City.

Since the president, Jacques Proulx, will take advantage of this opportunity to continue his disinformation campaign, I would like to inform the Elouse of the positive impact our free trade agreement wil have on agriculture. This Government has earmarked $1.5 billion for the dairy industry over the next five years. Subsidy policies will continue to apply to farm producers, whatever their president may say to the contrary. Our subsidy policies and quota systems which are so important for farmers will continue to apply. Our marketing boards will not be effected by the free trade agreement.

I may add that our major processors have not spoken out against free trade, that Lactantia, a company that buys 40 per cent of Quebec's milk production, is in favour of free trade, and that agricultural by-products such as beef will find additional markets in United States.

Finally, Mr. Speaker, if farm producers have any business sense at all, they should not protest against free trade. They should challenge their president, Mr. Jacques Proulx!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   FREE TRADE
Sub-subtopic:   EFFECT OF AGREEMENT ON AGRICULTURE
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ROAD TRANSPORT

LIB

Russell Gregoire MacLellan

Liberal

Mr. Russell MacLellan (Cape Breton-The Sydneys):

Mr. Speaker, Route Canada, formerly CN Route, formerly CN Express, closed its operations in Sydney. The federal Government sold what is now Route Canada for less than its value on the understanding that all the closing of the terminals would be done by the new owner, thereby sparing the federal Government from giving the bad news.

Route Canada, the federal Government, and the union took away protection the workers had under the Canada Labour Code. The men in Sydney were dismissed with only two weeks' notice, and the 17 dismissed in Sydney had a range of service between 16 and 46 years. Route Canada has made it look like it just dismissed the individuals when, in fact, it closed the terminal.

The federal Government offered benefits to those workers if they resigned prior to June 1, 1987. But the workers in Sydney were dismissed only five months later, which shows that there was collusion between the federal Government and the

company because the workers only received a fraction of the federal benefits that the company had to give.

I ask the federal Government to extend the benefit package which expired on June 1, 1987, to the workers who were just dismissed at CN Route.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   ROAD TRANSPORT
Sub-subtopic:   ROUTE CANADA-CLOSURE OF OPERATIONS IN SYDNEY, N.S.
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MULTICULTURALISM

December 2, 1987