November 16, 1987

?

Some Hon. Members:

Oh, oh!

November 16, 1987

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON FILM DISTRIBUTION POLICY
Permalink
PC

John Allen Fraser (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The Elon. Minister cannot be pressed to comment on a story in any newspaper. Elowever, the Elon. Minister cannot be stopped, if he wishes to do so.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON FILM DISTRIBUTION POLICY
Permalink
PC

Michael Holcombe Wilson (Minister of Finance)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Wilson (Etobicoke Centre):

I do not know whether I should take that as encouragement or not. I think I responded to that question. The Government has stated its policy and we are committed to that.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON FILM DISTRIBUTION POLICY
Permalink
NDP

Steven W. Langdon

New Democratic Party

Mr. Langdon:

In fact the previous question did not deal with this issue of delay.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON FILM DISTRIBUTION POLICY
Permalink

FILM DISTRIBUTION LEGISLATION

NDP

Steven W. Langdon

New Democratic Party

Mr. Steven W. Langdon (Essex-Windsor):

Mr. Speaker, since the Minister is handling this issue, can he make a commitment to the Elouse, one which was contradicted by people from the Ministry of Communications, that in fact there is to be no weakening of this film distribution legislation as a result of the trade deal?

Elon. Michael Wilson (Minister of Finance): Mr. Speaker, let me say again, which is very similar to what my colleague, the Minister of Communications, has said, that we intend to create a separate market for film distributors in Canada and to provide the opportunity for Canadian film distributors to take full advantage of that market.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FILM DISTRIBUTION LEGISLATION
Permalink

CANADIAN JOBS STRATEGY

PC

Donald Paul Ravis

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Don Ravis (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of Employment and Immigration. There have been numerous programs in Saskatoon operated by the YWCA and Immigrant Women of Saskatchewan, under the job re-entry program of the Canadian Jobs Strategy. These programs are aimed specifically at women's training.

The first programs were very beneficial and they wish to continue them. Will the Minister assure the House that the Government will continue to orient further programs and funding in such a way that women will have access to training and upgrading, and enhance their opportunity to join the labour force?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADIAN JOBS STRATEGY
Sub-subtopic:   ACCESS BY WOMEN TO JOB RE-ENTRY PROGRAMS
Permalink
PC

Benoît Bouchard (Minister of Employment and Immigration)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Benoit Bouchard (Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the Hon. Member's question. I am sure the Opposition will agree with me that women must be an important part of the labour market. The Canadian Jobs Strategy has provided many places for women in different parts of this program. I can assure my hon. friend that we will continue to deal with this question of increasing and upgrading the skills of women in the labour force. Furthermore, some two weeks ago I requested the provinces to open more apprenticeship places to women in terms of the availability of those opportunities because we believe they are

too restricted for women. In other words, there are not enough places and we must improve that situation.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADIAN JOBS STRATEGY
Sub-subtopic:   ACCESS BY WOMEN TO JOB RE-ENTRY PROGRAMS
Permalink

CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON EMPLOYMENT FOR WOMEN


Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grace-Lachine East): Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Prime Minister. In a recent speech, the Premier of Ontario referred to an Ontario study which said that women in manufacturing industries would be particularly hard hit by the Canada-lJ.S. trade agreement, and that over 100,000 Ontario women could lose their jobs as a result of that deal. Since that analysis can be applied to other provinces as well, when will the Prime Minister start taking these concerns seriously? If he insists on proceeding with this bad deal, will he at least put on the table a special readjustment and retraining program for these many Canadians who will lose their jobs?


PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, my hon. friend refers to an Ontario study. That document was widely panned and stands as a very disgraceful contribution to the debate. It was misleading. It was self serving, and it did not in any way withstand the scrutiny that one ought to bring to bear on documents submitted by public officials.

It is quite clear that Premier Peterson is as ashamed of that document as he is ashamed of comments made by Minister Quinter in regard to this debate, neither of which in any way contribute to illuminating the national debate in this regard.

In terms of the very legitimate concerns raised by my hon. friend in regard to employment opportunities for women, I am happy to point out to him that since this Government was sworn in it has created 1.019 million new jobs, over 55 per cent of which have gone to women. That is the kind of contribution we are trying to improve upon both here and across the country.

A number of studies, including one by Katie Macmillan for the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women, conclude that free trade will offer women higher paying jobs with better employment prospects throughout the country. Surely that is a national objective to which my hon. friend can subscribe.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-EFFECT ON EMPLOYMENT FOR WOMEN
Permalink

CONTENT OF AGREEMENT-PRIME MINISTER'S POSITION


Hon. Warren Allmand (Notre-Dame-de-Grace-Lachine East): Mr. Speaker, once again the Prime Minister has not answered the question. If he has better studies on job loss and job gains, let him make them public and put them before us. November 16, 1987



Most experts will agree that the free trade agreement will hurt Canada more than it will the United States, that it will hurt employees more than it will hurt employers. In these circumstances, why did the Prime Minister not insist, as many experts suggested, that a readjustment and retraining program be written right into the agreement so that Canadians would have assurance of new jobs if their present jobs were done away with? Why did he not do that?


PC

Martin Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, we have already indicated that, to the extent they are required, we and the provinces are ready to commit very important sums to assist workers in all areas to the extent this involves. We have already indicated that the studies available indicate net increases in just about every sector of employment and the economy. I think that is a very hopeful sign.

With regard to comments made, I would point out that on Saturday there was a report that Premier Peterson had a meeting with several American Congressmen, including the Chairman of the Small Business Committee of the House of Representatives, John Lafalce. He is very interested in free trade. He said, and I quote:

As I read it so far, Canada came out ahead. There is a general feeling within

the United States that the free trade agreement might be more favourable to

Canada than to the United States.

I think Mr. Lafalce has made an important statement and my hon. friend, who often likes to quote the Americans, might want to quote that one.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CONTENT OF AGREEMENT-PRIME MINISTER'S POSITION
Permalink

THE ADMINISTRATION

NDP

James Douglas Manly

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Manly (Cowichan-Malahat-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Prime Minister. Canadians now speak about a sleaze fatigue factor in Canadian politics resulting from three years of kickbacks, influence peddling and conflicts of interest. In light of allegations from Jean Marie Chastenay that in 1985 he was asked to make a $2,500 contribution to the P.C. Canada Fund in return for two surveying contracts from the Department of Transport, will the Prime Minister tell us what he has done to ensure that this kind of toll-gating will never happen again in Canadian politics, and that the bidding system for government contracts will be open and honest, and that those who receive those contracts will not be subject to this kind of economic blackmail?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS-REPORTED REQUEST FOR CONTRIBUTION TO P C. CANADA FUND
Permalink
PC

Michel Côté (Minister of Supply and Services)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michel Cote (Minister of Supply and Services):

Mr. Speaker, first of all, the Hon. Member ought to know that an investigation is now under way and that the results bring out the truth about this matter. I may also remind the Hon. Member that most, if not all, advertising contracts were

Oral Questions

awarded on a very competitive basis and that there was never any compromise on the quality, price and delivery date agreed upon.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ADMINISTRATION
Sub-subtopic:   GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS-REPORTED REQUEST FOR CONTRIBUTION TO P C. CANADA FUND
Permalink

REQUEST FOR NEW ETHICS PACKAGE

November 16, 1987