November 4, 1987

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21

CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-TELEVISING OF COMMITTEE HEARINGS URGED

LIB

Sheila Maureen Copps

Liberal

Ms. Sheila Copps (Hamilton East):

Mr. Speaker, if you can believe it, the Government is so afraid to let the world know about its views on free trade that it does not even want to televise the hearings that are held in capitals across the country.

It is bad enough that we must hold the current hearings in Ottawa behind closed doors so that we will not hear, for example, directly, as we did last night in the committee, from members of the Steel Producers Association that, even though we have free trade, they do not intend to pursue American markets because they have enough customers in Canada. Furthermore, they do not have the capacity to sell more steel to the United States.

If the steel industry, which is supposed to be one of the so-called winners in this bad deal, does not intend to pursue expanding steel sales to the United States, what in heaven's name is the reason for pursuing a free trade agreement? The public should have the right to know these facts, Mr. Speaker.

The Government saw that the Meech Lake debates were serious enough to be exposed to the public in full committee televised hearings. Surely an agreement which speaks about the very future of our country is important enough to be televised across Canada both through the hearings in Ottawa as well as in capitals across the country.

Let the people decide. What is the Government afraid of? It knows that this is not a free trade deal, it is a bad Mulroney deal, and let the people see-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-TELEVISING OF COMMITTEE HEARINGS URGED
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PC

John Allen Fraser (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The Member's time has expired. The Hon. Member for Fundy-Royal (Mr. Corbett).

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-TELEVISING OF COMMITTEE HEARINGS URGED
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VIA RAIL

PC

Robert Alfred Corbett

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bob Corbett (Fundy-Royal):

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada is to be commended for taking action to rectify a problem that could have seriously affected the popularity of VIA's passenger train, the Atlantic Limited.

As a result of representations and negotiations undertaken by the Government of Canada, a 90-day trial period agreement has been struck with the American authorities to amend the immigration practices that have deterred many Canadians from riding the Atlantic Limited between the Maritimes and central Canada.

For a 90 day period, beginning on December 1, only those Atlantic Limited passengers detraining in Maine will be subject to U.S. immigration inquiries. Other passengers will enjoy an undisturbed and comfortable ride.

This is good news for those who enjoy rail travel and want to see the Atlantic Limited remain one of the great rail services in Canada. We should be delighted that both Canadian and American authorities recognize the importance of the Atlantic Limited to Maritimers as a vital transportation link.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   VIA RAIL
Sub-subtopic:   ATLANTIC LIMITED SERVICE-THROUGH PASSENGERS' FREEDOM FROM BORDER-CROSSING INQUIRIES
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VETERANS AFFAIRS

NDP

John Edmund Parry

New Democratic Party

Mr. John Parry (Kenora-Rainy River):

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow a group of 17 native veterans will be returning to Europe to pay tribute to their fallen brethren who served Canada in World Wars I and II. The memorial visit by the veterans to several Canadian war grave sites will include a traditional Indian ceremony to be conducted on this Remembrance Day at the Dieppe cemetery in France.

Many Canadians may not realize that, at the time of their enlistment into the Canadian Armed Forces, Canadian aboriginal people had no rights to vote nor could they be conscripted to defend our country. For many of these veterans it was their first experience away from their home communities surrounded by foreign languages and customs of their fellow soldiers.

On the home front, the loss of a provider and a companion meant greater responsibilities, loneliness, and hardship for

November 4, 1987

many Indian women. Upon their return from war, many of these volunteer veterans and their children were stripped of their Indian status and it is only now being returned to them 42 years later following the 1985 amendments to the Indian Act.

The sacrifices made by native veterans to serve their country were unselfish and should be a source of pride for all Canadians. The fact remains that their wartime contribution has yet to be fully appreciated. And so, Mr. Speaker, this Remembrance Day when we pay our respects to all Canadian veterans to whom we are indebted, let us remember in particular the contribution of Canada's aboriginal soldiers.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   VETERANS AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   TRIBUTE TO CONTRIBUTION OF NATIVE VETERANS
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NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION WEEK

PC

Carole Jacques

Progressive Conservative

Ms. Carole Jacques (Montreal-Mercier):

Mr. Speaker, today is the fourth day of National Crime Prevention Week.

We are all aware of the damages caused by drugs. We must therefore make sure that our young people have the information they need to make their decisions in the full knowledge of what the consequences of their actions will be for themselves and those who love them.

Prevention starts at home, in school and in all other places where young people spend their time.

During this National Crime Prevention Week, certain communities will concentrate on the drug issue. A number of youth conferences will be held in such places as Vancouver, Edmonton and Summerside to examine the problems and find possible solutions. Tomorrow, Mr. Speaker, crime prevention will be one of the issues discussed at the Maisonneuve College, in Montreal.

Whatever means we take to prevent crime are restricted only by the limits of our imagination.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION WEEK
Sub-subtopic:   BAD EFFECTS OF DRUGS
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IMMIGRATION

LIB

Gilles Grondin

Liberal

Mr. Gilles Grondin (Saint-Maurice):

Mr. Speaker, for the past several months, we have seen the Department of Employment and Immigration make various cutbacks to the staff of our Employment and Immigration Centres throughout Canada

and to the budgets allocated to the various programs of the Department.

On the other hand, we have also seen how unimportant the Conservatives consider the integration of immigrants into Canadian society.

We would never have expected the budgetary cutbacks of this Department to affect such an important sector as the programs to give immigrants training in one of our two official languages. Believe it or not, Mr. Speaker, this is precisely what is now going on in the St. Maurice region.

In my constituency, fifteen people had registered for a French language training program offered by the Canada Employment Centre, which was to start on October 26.

Four days before that date, on October 22, these fifteen people were advised by the Employment Centres in the region that the French course had been cancelled because of budgetary cutbacks.

Is it not completely illogical, Mr. Speaker, to make cutbacks in programs aimed at giving some training in one of our two official languages to our immigrants so that they may function normally in Canadian society?

These immigrants are showing their will to join our society, but the Conservative Government puts obstacles in their way instead of providing them with the tools they need.

Is this not an unacceptable situation, Mr. Speaker?

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION
Sub-subtopic:   IMMIGRANTS' DIFFICULTY IN INTEGRATING WITH FRANCOPHONE COLLECTIVITY
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NORTHERN AFFAIRS

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, recently Mr. Bill Pierce, long time oil man, pipeliner, and Vice-President of Interprovincial Pipeline Company, was declared "Corporate Citizen of the Decade" by Chief Gerry Antoine of the Fort Simpson Indian Band at a meeting of the Decho Regional Council.

Referring to the construction of the Mackenzie Valley pipeline, Chief Antoine told Mr. Pierce:

We do not feel that native people were intentionally abused by your firm.

Thank you for keeping most of your promises when the pipeline was under

construction and continuing this approach through the operation stage.

Judge Thomas Berger, the southern socialist, was wrong. The people of the Mackenzie Valley were right. Oil and gas developments can take place in the North to everyone's mutual benefit. This has been proven by men like Bill Pierce and Gerry Antoine.

November 4, 1987

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   NORTHERN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   MACKENZIE VALLEY PIPELINE-NATIVE PEOPLE'S TRIBUTE TO "CORPORATE CITIZEN OF THE DECADE"
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NATIVE PEOPLES

NDP

Margaret Anne Mitchell

New Democratic Party

Ms. Margaret Mitchell (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, the most tragic consequence of the European influence on the native peoples of Canada has been the loss of their children. White child caring agencies using non-native standards have apprehended thousands of Indian children and placed them in white foster homes. Children who have lost their identity and have nowhere to go at age 17 end up on the streets.

Native people want to reclaim their children and are beginning to set up Indian child care agencies on reserves, with foster homes as well. The federal Government should be facilitating this positive development. Instead, it is starving bands for resources. It pays for the apprehension of children but provides no resources to strengthen natural families.

In Manitoba, Indian child caring agencies are expected to provide preventive support to families and train Indian workers on a budget 30 per cent less than that provided to provincial child care agencies. In Alberta, bands which want native children returned are being challenged by foster parents who are connected with the white association.

The Indian Association of Alberta has been refused Indian child welfare training programs. There are no funds for on-reserve community support services and family counselling. For native children, tomorrow is too late. I call upon the Government to provide Indian people with the resources required to make a success of both Indian self-government and Indian child welfare.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIVE PEOPLES
Sub-subtopic:   PLACEMENT OF CHILDREN IN WHITE FOSTER HOMES-CALL FOR INCREASED FUNDING FOR INDIAN BANDS
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CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-SUPPORT FROM CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT BUSINESS

PC

William Lesick

Progressive Conservative

Mr. William G. Lesick (Edmonton East):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Standing Committee on External Affairs and International Trade welcomed the Canadian Federation of Independent Business and its position on free trade with the United States. The President, Mr. Bulloch, said:

The CFIB believes freer trade with the United States to be the best way to

ensure access for Canadian exports . .. and welcomes the opportunity to

compete for new business in an enriched and enlarged market-place.

He also said that it is expected to provide significant benefits to small business.

The CFIB is an established, credible organization that speaks for 80,000 businesses across Canada. My riding of Edmonton East has a high concentration of these entrepreneurs and I have heard from many of them. They feel that the agreement is good for Canada. It is good for Alberta, very good for Edmonton, and I urge all Hon. Members to solicit the

views of their business communities. Yes, free trade is good for small business. Free trade is good for Canadians.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-SUPPORT FROM CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT BUSINESS
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CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-PROTEST BY ONTARIO FARMERS

LIB

Don Boudria

Liberal

Mr. Don Boudria (Glengarry-Prescott-Russell):

Mr. Speaker, Ontario farmers are ploughing into the Prime Minister's (Mr. Mulroney) free trade deal. More than 400 of them were at Queen's Park yesterday to protest the deal. The excellent Ontario Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Jack Riddell, echoed the feelings of the farmers when he said:

This deal flies in the face of the long-term heritage of this country. Family farms are at risk here.

It is quite evident that Ontario farmers have been allowed to bleed to death so that the Prime Minister can leave his mark on history. We in the Liberal Party will not allow him to soil his hands with the blood and sweat of Ontario farmers. We intend to protect our supply management system. We intend to protect the farmers of this country.

[ Translation]

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT-PROTEST BY ONTARIO FARMERS
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November 4, 1987