November 2, 1987

ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS

DEATH OF FORMER PROVINCIAL PRIME MINISTER

PC

Robert René de Cotret (Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion; Minister of State for Science and Technology)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Robert de Cotret (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of the Prime Minister who has been confined to his bed for the last few days, I would like to say the following, on his behalf.

The death of Rene Levesque has affected me more than I can say. To a whole generation of Quebecers, including myself, Rene Levesque embodied the pride, the sense of belonging and the passion of Quebecers for their province.

From the dawn of the quiet Revolution to his retirement from political life, and during the May 1980 Referendum, Rene Levesque was the man of one dream and one cause: Quebec's full emancipation. During those years he took his province through some of the most difficult and at the same time most exhilarating times in its history.

Like all great politicians, Mr. Levesque was both a dreamer and a realist. He was able to make passion listen to reason. Whether or not all Canadians agreed with the cause for which he fought to the very end, they owe him this tribute: Rene Levesque was a great man and a great democrat.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DEATH OF FORMER PROVINCIAL PRIME MINISTER
Sub-subtopic:   RENE LEVESQUE 1922-1987
Permalink
LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. John N. Turner (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, Quebec has just lost one of its most passionate sons and one of its most articulate spokesmen. Canada has lost a figure who dominated public life in this country and in his own province for nearly twenty years.

Rene Levesque embodied some of the characteristics of this country. His impatience, energy and compassion, his brillant discourse, his emotions, all will remain engraved in our memory as striking attributes of this remarkable man and his time.

For English Canadians he was that sometimes incorrigible man who would not let them forget his dream of a more sovereign Quebec.

I knew Rene Levesque. I had the honour to be the Parliamentary Secretary to the late Arthur Laing when he was Minister of Natural Resources of this country and Mr. Levesque was the Minister of Natural Resources. From 1963 on I enjoyed his company and the stimulating force of his personality. I did not share his vision of Quebec, nor his vision of Canada. But never once did I doubt his sincerity and his passionate commitment to the people of Quebec. Although he did not succeed in his ultimate quest, he forced Canada to come to terms with Quebec's place in Confederation under a renewed federalism. Rene Levesque was a man who reflected the spirit of Quebec and, in some ways, perhaps the spirit of Canada.

Rene Levesque's entire political career was a series of superlatives. He experienced great victories and great defeats. There was nothing ordinary about this man.

We remember the scenes of triumph on November 15, 1976. We remember the emotional atmosphere on both sides on the night of the Referendum in 1980.

Emotional and impatient though he was, Rene Levesque always set democracy above all other principles, and he always respected the democratic decisions made by Quebecers.

Mr. Speaker, speaking on behalf of the Liberal Party of Canada, we offer our sincere condolences to Rene Levesque's family and to all his friends.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DEATH OF FORMER PROVINCIAL PRIME MINISTER
Sub-subtopic:   RENE LEVESQUE 1922-1987
Permalink
NDP

John Edward Broadbent

New Democratic Party

Hon. Edward Broadbent (Oshawa):

Mr. Speaker, today I wish to join all Canadians who sensed a profound loss upon the decease of the former Premier of Quebec, Rene Levesque.

Rene Levesque was for all Quebecers a symbol of their pride in belonging to one of the founding peoples of this country.

All his life he fought for recognition of the language and culture of more than 6 million Canadians, in Quebec and across Canada.

As Premier of Quebec, he acquired the respect and admiration of the entire political community in this country through his integrity, his great sense of justice, and his respect for democracy.

November 2, 1987

Committee Reports

The integrity of the government led by Rene Levesque aroused the admiration of the rest of Canada.

Rene Levesque was a very likable and a very compassionate man, which makes this an even more tragic loss for all of us.

However, the tremendous work done by Rene Levesque will not have been in vain. It has already brought about profound changes in our society, and the process continues.

On behalf of all my colleagues in the House, and I know countless thousands of English and French-speaking Canadians outside the Province of Quebec, I extend the profoundest sympathies to Madam Levesque and all those who were close in the life of a great Quebecer and, in a very special sense, a great Canadian.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   DEATH OF FORMER PROVINCIAL PRIME MINISTER
Sub-subtopic:   RENE LEVESQUE 1922-1987
Permalink

COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE

PC

Bruce Halliday

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, the Standing Committee on National Health and Welfare has the honour to present its first report. In accordance with its mandate under Standing Order 96(2), the committee agreed to study alcohol and drug abuse in Canada. The committee heard evidence from individuals and representatives of organizations in the field of addiction. It urges the Government to consider the recommendations contained herein.

Drug abuse in Canada is not a new problem. Last December when the Standing Committee on National Health and Welfare began its study of drug abuse, there had been renewed concern by professionals and by ordinary Canadians about the abuse of drugs. A national poll that had recently been conducted indicated that the vast majority of Canadians believed that Canada had a serious problem of illicit drug use.

Following a meeting with the President of the United States, our Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) called attention to this problem and began a governmental review process that resulted in $210 million in new federal Government initiatives under the national drug strategy.

The committee believed that it had an important role to play in providing advice to the House and to federal and provincial Governments on how best to address problems of substance abuse. Our work took us across Canada and brought us face to face with health care and social service professionals, government officials, citizen groups, young people, parents, and educators. We soon came to realize that substance abuse problems are not limited to the abuse of street drugs, but that Canada faces problems of the abuse of illicit drugs, legal overuse of prescription drugs and, above all, the abuse of alcohol.

Substance abuse problems are not limited to one part of Canada or one age group, but affect Canadians of all ages and walks of life in every province.

It is my pleasure to table in this House the first report of the Standing Committee on National Health and Welfare entitled "Booze, Pills and Dope-Reducing Substance Abuse in Canada".

Our committee is recommending new initiatives with enhanced funding in prevention and treatment programs with a special emphasis on youth and aboriginal peoples. We are proposing steps to reduce the carnage on our highways caused by impaired drivers.

After careful review of the issue of substance abuse in the workplace, our committee is strongly opposed to the random testing of Canadian workers. We prefer to see a more cooperative and therapeutic approach to drug abuse in the workplace. Where drug testing is required because of real demonstrated risk to safety, we have recommended policies to provide safeguards.

Our committee wishes to see the federal Government discourage abusive drinking by maintaining an approach to taxation which recognizes the need to balance public health concerns with the overwhelming acceptance of social drinking by Canadians.

We are concerned that those who profit from the sale of alcoholic beverages shoulder their fair share of the responsibility to prevent alcohol abuse. Toward this end we are recommending that beverage alcohol advertisers be required to provide appropriate public education messages.

While the focus of the committee was on the health aspects of substance abuse, we also considered a number of measures related to the control of the supply of drugs. For example, we are recommending that federal and provincial Governments take steps to close "head shops", those businesses which specialize in the sale of drug paraphernalia. We would like to see law enforcement agencies given better tools to allow them to trace the profits of international drug trafficking.

Our committee has provided recommendations for the education of health care professionals, for program evaluation, and for the creation of a national centre on substance abuse. We realize that no matter what steps are introduced by Governments, there will always be some people who will abuse drugs. But we also believe that those recommendations, if implemented, will have a significant and positive effect on the reduction of substance abuse problems in Canada.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE
Sub-subtopic:   NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE-FIRST REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
Permalink

PUBLIC ACCOUNTS-ELEVENTH REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE

LIB

Aideen Nicholson

Liberal

Miss Aideen Nicholson (Trinity):

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to present the eleventh report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts which deals with income tax expenditures.

November 2, 1987

The report particularly highlights the need for improved information to Parliament about tax expenditures, and the need for the Department of Finance to improve and put in place sound monitoring and evaluation procedures. Improvements are required both in the quality of tax expenditure information, and in the process whereby such information is provided to Parliament.

Income tax expenditures are demand driven, and by their nature may cost more than initially anticipated. Therefore, it is important that Parliament and the public be better informed about them.

The committee has recommended that the Minister of Finance (Mr. Wilson) table annual tax expenditure accounts in Parliament starting in 1987.

Pursuant to Standing Order 99(2) the committee has requested a comprehensive government response to certain recommendations.

[Editor's note: See today's Votes and Proceedings.]

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PUBLIC ACCOUNTS-ELEVENTH REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
Permalink

PETITIONS

LIB

Jean-Robert Gauthier (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Robert Gauthier (Ottawa-Vanier):

Mr. Speaker, it is my duty to present a petition which is in accordance with Standing Order 106 and which relates to a sad situation concerning the broadcasting of Calgary's Winter Olympic Games, namely the fact that francophones outside Quebec will not have access to nation-wide French broadcasts. The situation is so serious, Mr. Speaker, that I have a number of petitions to present and I will be doing that this week with the support of my colleagues with a view to urging the Government and Radio-Canada to do something.

Mr. Speaker, close to one million francophones residing outside Quebec will not be able to watch French television broadcasts of the Calgary Olympic Winter Games.

Whereas the CRTC compromise under which French TV signals would be made available to cable companies is unacceptable because not all francophone communities outside Quebec have cable service; and whereas French-speaking Canadians will pay their share of the $200 million earmarked by the Conservative Government for the Calgary Winter Olympics Games organization, your petitioners humbly call upon Parliament to urge the Conservative Government to respect its commitments towards Canada's linguistic minorities by providing all communities from coast to coast with the possibility of watching, in both official languages, broadcasts of this international event, the 1988 Winter Olympics Games.

Petitions

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR BROADCASTING OF WINTER OLYMPICS ACROSS CANADA IN THE FRENCH LANGUAGE
Permalink
LIB

Fernand Robichaud

Liberal

Mr. Fernand Robichaud (Westmorland-Kent):

Mr. Speaker, it is my duty to table a petition on behalf of residents of Shediac, St-Charles-de-Kent, Richibucto, Bass River, Rexton, Cap-Pele and Saint-Andre. Your petitioners deplore the fact that as part of its proposed tax reform, the Government is considering the possibility of putting a tax on food.

Wherefore, Mr. Speaker, your petitioners humbly pray Parliament to reject any measure that would have the effect of imposing a sales tax on food products.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   OPPOSITION TO TAX ON FOOD
Permalink
NDP

Abram Ernest Epp

New Democratic Party

Mr. Ernie Epp (Thunder Bay-Nipigon):

Mr. Speaker, it is my duty to present a petition on behalf of constituents from the City of Thunder Bay and the Town of Red Rock who protest the changes made to the taxation system of Canada.

They protest that the tax reform proposals do not change an already unfair tax structure for average Canadian families, while wealthy Canadians earning over $100,000 per year do not pay their fair share and even receive a tax cut under the proposals.

They also protest the fact that 60,000 profitable corporations will be allowed to pay no income tax at all under the reform, and that the reform proposals include the possibility of a tax levy on food and other essential items.

They press for the restoration of full indexation in the personal tax system and urge the House of Commons to change these proposals of the Government.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   OPPOSITION TO PROPOSED TAX REFORMS
Permalink
LIB

Marie Thérèse Rollande Killens

Liberal

Mrs. Therese Killens (Saint-Michel-Ahuntsic):

Mr. Speaker, I have the honour of tabling petitions signed by residents of Lac-a-la-Croix, Quebec City, Saint-Augustin, Nepean, Ontario, Sault Ste Marie and Thunder Bay. These 105 signatures are in addition to the 30,463 I tabled previously. Your petitioners are aware of the fact that since 1974, federal automobile vehicle safety regulations allow the use of airbags on the driver's side in private cars. They are also aware that during the public debate on highway safety last April, it was acknowledged that an airbag on the driver's side would further reduce the number of deaths and serious injuries.

Wherefore your petitioners humbly pray Parliament to make the following mandatory: 1. The use of three-point seatbelts for passengers in rear seats; 2. The use of airbags in front seats.

November 2, 1987

10606______________________________________

Order Paper Questions QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER

(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MANDATORY USE OF AIRBAGS AND THREE-POINT SEAT BELTS IN FRONT AND REAR SEATS RESPECTIVELY OF AUTOMOBILES
Permalink
PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis (Minister of State (Government House Leader); Minister of State (Treasury Board))

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Doug Lewis (Minister of State and Minister of State (Treasury Board)):

Mr. Speaker, question No. 189 will be answered today.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MANDATORY USE OF AIRBAGS AND THREE-POINT SEAT BELTS IN FRONT AND REAR SEATS RESPECTIVELY OF AUTOMOBILES
Permalink
NDP

Mr. Riis (N.D.P. House Leader)

New Democratic Party

1. Does the Canadian Security Intelligence Service maintain security files on any Member of Parliament and, if so, on whom?

2. Has CSIS conducted an investigation or made any reports on the activities of any Member and, if so, on whom?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CSIS-SECURITY FILES ON MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink
PC

James Francis Kelleher (Solicitor General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. James Kelleher (Solicitor General of Canada):

1. For

security and privacy reasons, CSIS does not divulge publicly the names of any individual on whom it gathers personal information. Furthermore, as a matter of national security policy, CSIS does not confirm or deny specific targets of investigation.

2. The Service only investigates matters that fall within its mandate as defined by the CSIS Act. Specifically, the Service investigates any person who is involved in activities that constitute a threat to the security of Canada as defined in Section 2 of the CSIS Act. For the reasons already stated, the information requested cannot be provided.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CSIS-SECURITY FILES ON MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink
PC

Douglas Grinslade Lewis (Minister of State (Government House Leader); Minister of State (Treasury Board))

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lewis:

I ask, Mr. Speaker, that the remaining questions be allowed to stand.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CSIS-SECURITY FILES ON MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink
PC

Steve Eugene Paproski (Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

The Acting Speaker (Mr. Paproski):

The question enumerated by the Minister has been answered. Shall the remaining questions stand?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CSIS-SECURITY FILES ON MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CSIS-SECURITY FILES ON MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink

November 2, 1987