April 3, 1987

FINANCE

PC

Reginald Francis Stackhouse

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Reginald Stackhouse (Scarborough West):

Mr. Speaker, in the past two weeks three chartered banks have heeded Parliament's call to cut interest rates on credit cards.

When are major retailers and department stores going to show that they have some responsible corporate citizenship too? They are still levying a whopping 28.8 per cent interest on unpaid balances whether a balance is $40, $400 or $4,000. One department store pushes its charge cards by saying it will help the consumer with a new home, a new baby, a new decor, a new hobby, a new style, but it does not add "at the same old interest rate". Another says that it is easier and faster to use the charge card than to write a cheque. It is, Mr. Speaker, until you pay 28.8 per cent interest.

April 3, 1987

Oral Questions LABOUR RELATIONS

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   FINANCE
Sub-subtopic:   CREDIT CARDS-HIGH INTEREST RATES CHARGED BY DEPARTMENT STORES
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CHANGES TO BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOUR LEGISLATION

NDP

Pauline Jewett

New Democratic Party

Ms. Pauline Jewett (New Westminster-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Social Credit Government in British Columbia proposed radical changes to B.C.'s labour legislation. These proposals will bring sweeping changes to union certification, dispute settlement, the protection of workers by unions, and they will increase the Government's powers to intervene in labour-management disputes.

The changes were introduced with absolutely no consultation with the B.C. Federation of Labour which represents a quarter of a million workers in the province. They are ill considered, disruptive proposals that will create mistrust, insecurity, and increased conflict.

We in the New Democratic Party call on the B.C. Government to withdraw these drastic changes to labour law, to study far more carefully and thoroughly any future changes to labour legislation, and to consult fully with the B.C. Federation of Labour before making any changes in the province's labour legislation.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CHANGES TO BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOUR LEGISLATION
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CHILD CARE

PC

Ross Belsher

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ross Belsher (Fraser Valley East):

Mr. Speaker, there has been a lot of recent media comment on the dangers of the so-called informal market in so far as child care is concerned. I would like to point out that some of this unlicensed care includes nursery schools, junior kindergartens, and kindergartens, none of which are considered licensed.

Teachers in these facilities are often better educated than licensed child-care workers. May I ask you, Mr. Speaker, and the Canadian public, are we really to believe that children in these facilities are at risk?

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CHILD CARE
Sub-subtopic:   CHILDREN IN KINDERGARTENS AND NURSERY SCHOOLS
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

CANADA-UNITED STATES SUMMIT NUCLEAR ARMS NEGOTIATIONS-UNITED STATES PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS TO PARLIAMENT

LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. John N. Turner (Leader of the Opposition):

When preparing for the meeting between the Prime Minister and the President of the United States, will the Deputy Prime Minister recommend that the Prime Minister inform the President we are pleased to hear there are negotiations between the super powers, especially on intermediate nuclear arms, and that we hope Star Wars will not prevent these negotiations from progressing? Will the Prime Minister

recommend that the President review the status of these arms negotiations in his speech here in Parliament?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES SUMMIT NUCLEAR ARMS NEGOTIATIONS-UNITED STATES PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS TO PARLIAMENT
Permalink
PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Vice-President; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and President of the Privy Council):

Mr. Speaker, that will certainly be one of the topics to be discussed when the Prime Minister and President Reagan meet. The issue of arms control and east-west relations are certainly issues in the international forum that require attention. As to whether the President will be specifically referring to this in his address to the House of Commons, I am not in a position to indicate to the right hon. gentleman, but assuming the prominence which this issue takes in terms not only of the bilateral discussions that will be going on but indeed the international importance, I would suspect that reference will be made.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES SUMMIT NUCLEAR ARMS NEGOTIATIONS-UNITED STATES PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS TO PARLIAMENT
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EFFECT OF U.S. ACTIONS ON CANADIAN AGRICULTURE

LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. John N. Turner (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, will the Prime Minister in his discussions with the President of the United States impress upon the President the grave difficulties caused to Canadian farmers by the U.S. Farm Bill and its export subsidies, and the trade war between the United States and the European Economic Community? Will he also urge the President to include this issue in his address before Parliament because there is grave concern in Canadian rural communities and in the country generally?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EFFECT OF U.S. ACTIONS ON CANADIAN AGRICULTURE
Permalink
PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Vice-President; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and President of the Privy Council):

Mr. Speaker, indeed that will be an issue raised as it has been raised on many other occasions. I would like to draw the attention of the Right Hon. Leader of the Opposition to the initiative taken by the Minister for International Trade in New Zealand where she outlined a five-point program on behalf of the Canadian Government. Clearly, on behalf of the Government she has taken a leadership role in trying to work toward a common approach to address this very deep and disturbing issue as it relates to the future of the grains and oil-seeds industry in Canada. It will be dealt with at the multilateral trade level, and I am sure it will certainly be dealt with at the Venice summit. The Minister is organizing a meeting of several of the exporting nations to be held in Canada to develop that common approach and to treat this issue so that on common ground the exporting nations can speak with one voice.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   EFFECT OF U.S. ACTIONS ON CANADIAN AGRICULTURE
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CANADIAN SOVEREIGNTY IN ARCTIC

LIB

John Napier Turner (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. John N. Turner (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, when the Prime Minister meets the President will he urge President Reagan and the American Government to recognize Canada's sovereignty in the Arctic? Would he also urge the President to make an explicit statement before Parliament when he addresses us on Monday indicating that the American Government explicitly recognizes Canada's unconditional sovereignty over our North?

April 3, 1987

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SOVEREIGNTY IN ARCTIC
Permalink
PC

Donald Frank Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister; Vice-President; President of the Privy Council; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and President of the Privy Council):

Mr. Speaker, as the right hon. gentleman is aware, there are some obvious differences of opinion on this particular issue. I can assume that what will be sought is an attempt to find common ground to deal with this issue. I think the bottom line from Canada's standpoint is that we will be looking for ways and means to preserve Canada's interests, which will certainly not be bargained away.

We have taken a very strong position with regard to the issue of sovereignty and the entrenchment of our sovereign rights in the North. That was evidenced by the announcement that we will proceed with the building of the Polar 8 icebreaker, the delineation of the straight baseline, and other major initiatives that have been announced by the Secretary of State for External Affairs.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SOVEREIGNTY IN ARCTIC
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PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF HON. GERARD LATUL1PPE, QUEBEC SOLICITOR GENERAL

PC

John Allen Fraser (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Order! I would like to draw the attention of the House to the presence in our gallery of the Hon. Gerard Latulippe, Solicitor General of the province of Quebec.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF HON. GERARD LATUL1PPE, QUEBEC SOLICITOR GENERAL
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PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF PAST PRESIDENT OF U.S. ASSOCIATION OF FORMER MEMBERS OF CONGRESS

PC

John Allen Fraser (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I also wish to draw the attention of Hon. Members to the presence in the gallery of Senator Edward Moss of Salt Lake City, Utah, a past President of the U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress and the guest of honour last night at the meeting of former Members of the House of Commons and the Senate.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF PAST PRESIDENT OF U.S. ASSOCIATION OF FORMER MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
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April 3, 1987