April 3, 1987

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21

CITIZENSHIP

LIB

Jean-Robert Gauthier (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Robert Gauthier (Ottawa-Vanier):

Mr. Speaker, today I should like to speak on behalf of some of my constituents who have expressed concern about the inordinate amount of time it takes to obtain Canadian citizenship.

I am told that under normal circumstances the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or the Canadian Security Intelligence Service need three months to file an investigation report.

This sounds like a long delay, but in some cases the authorities do need time to do their work. Well, Mr. Speaker, it would seem that of late these delays have been as long as eight months, and this is unacceptable.

For example, Mr. Georges Tymowski wrote to me recently to inform me that, although he signed his application on June 16, 1986, he is still waiting for the results of the security investigation to complete the process. Mr. Ahmad Awale is another applicant who has been waiting for a long time for the completion of the investigation.

This is an unacceptable situation, Mr. Speaker, because it is prejudicial to people who need access to certain Government services such as passports.

I hope the Government is aware of the problem and will take every measure required to redress the situation.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CITIZENSHIP
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST THAT DELAYS IN DEALING WITH APPLICATIONS BE REDUCED
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FORESTRY

PC

Ted William Schellenberg

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ted Schellenberg (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, almost half the Members in this House represent ridings whose economies are dependent on the forest industry. To a great extent our nation's future is tied to the future of our forests.

Professor Les Reed and others at the University of British Columbia are discussing putting together a new facility called the Western Forests Science Centre.

Such a world-class facility would involve the forest industry, academics, and Government. It would greatly enhance the capability of the UBC forest faculty to teach and to attract the very best post-graduate students and visiting scholars.

More than that, Mr. Speaker, it would give the forest community in British Columbia a tremendous psychological shot in the arm.

And where would the funding for the Western Forests Science Centre come from? The recently imposed export tax, of course. Only 5 per cent of the funds the Province of British Columbia will receive this year alone would be required.

To paraphrase the poet:

I think that I shall never see A poem, lovely as a tree . . .

But more than that, 1 hope there'll be,

A Forest Science Centre, at UBC!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   FORESTRY
Sub-subtopic:   PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT OF WESTERN FORESTS SCIENCE CENTRE
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

NDP

James Douglas Manly

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Manly (Cowichan-Malahat-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, as Canada focuses on its relationship with the United States during the visit of President Reagan, I want to draw attention to Canada's use of non-union labour in the construction of the new Canadian Embassy in Washington.

The Embassy is being built by union contractors except for three crafts, one of which is the sheet metal workers, who are

April 3, 1987

being paid substandard wages, with no health or other benefits.

Because many of these workers lack experience and training, there is concern that some of their work will not pass inspection, and that safety and health problems will result.

Since December of last year union officials have tried to meet with our Ambassador to discuss the problem. While the Embassy has agreed in principle to such a meeting, it has never set the time or the place.

I urge the Government to instruct our Ambassador to arrange this meeting in the near future so that the problem can be resolved.

We need to have good relations not only with American officials but also with the American people, including working people.

[ Translation]

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   CONSTRUCTION OF NEW EMBASSY IN WASHINGTON-USE OF NON-UNION LABOUR
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OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

PC

Suzanne Fortin-Duplessis

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Suzanne Duplessis (Louis-Hebert):

Mr. Speaker, this week, the Commissionner of Official Languages has submitted his report for 1986.

As a French speaking Member of Parliament, 1 am sensitive to the Canadian language problem and I am very pleased to commend the Committee on Official Languages for the excellent work done under the chairmanship of the Hon. Member for Charlevoix. 1 commend Members of that Committee for their tremendous work.

However, much remains to be done and this is why 1 very much look forward to the tabling of the Official Languages Bill, which will have to reflect this country's linguistic duality and clearly state our commitment to French-speaking and English-speaking minorities in Canada.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
Sub-subtopic:   MEASURE TO IMPROVE SITUATION
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SHIPBUILDING

LIB

George Roland Henderson

Liberal

Mr. George Henderson (Egmont):

Mr. Speaker, the Government's current standing in the polls is no accident.

During the 1984 election campaign the Tories made many promises which they have since broken.

Nowhere is this record more horrendous than in its treatment of the Canadian shipbuilding industry.

In fact the Conservatives have not only broken their promises, they have slashed the shipbuilding industry assistance program, and they have slashed the performance improvement grants just when these programs were most needed.

The situation is even worse for shipyards in Atlantic Canada. In my province there is the Georgetown shipyard. The future of its workers is not solely a provincial responsibility as some would suggest. At a recent meeting the Council of Maritime Premiers expressed their impatience with the federal Government which has turned a blind eye toward Atlantic Canada. I call upon the Government to get off its seat and take some action.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   SHIPBUILDING
Sub-subtopic:   CRITICISM OF GOVERNMENT POLICY
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AIR SAFETY

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, since its inception in 1984, the Canadian Aviation Safety Board, through its independent investigation of accidents and its recommendations, has done much to advance air safety in Canada.

Canadian aviation activity is very high with 26,000 civil aircraft and 1,300 licensed airports handling annually some 54 million passengers. In 1986 there were 495 aircraft accidents in Canada, 73 of which involved fatalities.

The recent annual report of the board shows a favourable continuing downward trend in the accident rate, but unfortunately accident survivability remains unchanged.

Let us encourage the board in its important work of making air travel in Canada even safer than is presently the case.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   AIR SAFETY
Sub-subtopic:   WORK OF CANADIAN AVIATION SAFETY BOARD
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NATIONAL PARKS

NDP

James Ross Fulton

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Fulton (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, many Canadians think that a settlement has been reached between the Haida people, the federal Government, and Victoria regarding Lyell Island, Windy Bay, and a National Parks reserve in South Moresby.

Despite a declared six-week moratorium on logging permits on Lyell Island, logging continues right down into the area sought for a national park. Last month the Hon. Member for Okanagan-Similkameen (Mr. King) had a letter published in British Columbia which falsely claimed that the B.C. Tory caucus was "unanimous in its support of the western forest products solution". That Tory Member forgets that at least

April 3, 1987

five Tory MPs do not hold that view, including yourself, Mr. Speaker.

The Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) met with the B.C. Premier recently and obtained his support for an early settlement of the boundaries for the park reserve, including all of Lyell. Next week the federal and provincial Ministers of the Environment meet to finalize the boundaries and move forward with compensation and economic development projects for the park, Sandspit, and the islands generally.

However, just hours before a settlement we discover that there are secret plans to go ahead and log Windy Bay, other parts of Lyell Island, and the small islands to the north and west of Lyell. Canadians were led to believe that all of Lyell would be included. We are sadly learning otherwise.

Mir. Speaker: I must say that all Hon. Members know that the matter raised by the Hon. Member for Skeena (Mr. Fulton) is of course a very serious one about which many people have very strong views.

However, I would ask Hon. Members when they make statements not to refer in one way or another to what they may think the view of the Speaker may be on any particular matter. I would ask for that courtesy.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL PARKS
Sub-subtopic:   LYELL ISLAND-CONTINUATION OF LOGGING
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?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL PARKS
Sub-subtopic:   LYELL ISLAND-CONTINUATION OF LOGGING
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CHILD CARE

PC

William (Bill) Gottselig

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Bill Gottselig (Moose Jaw):

Mr. Speaker, I rise today in defence of the traditional Canadian family, the family which many Members opposite have said is like the dinosaur- extinct. I refer, of course, to the recent statements pertaining to the issue of child care, statements that only 16 per cent of families are traditional, by which it is taken to mean that only one parent goes to work and the other parent stays at home to care for the children.

I do not know from where Hon. Members have obtained their information. However, I would point out that the figure obviously does not relate to families with young children. In fact 44 per cent of families with children under the age of three years have one spouse at home full-time. Thirty-eight per cent of families with children three years to five years of age have a spouse at home full-time.

The traditional Canadian family is not dead. I should like to know who the Opposition is including in its figures. Is it including retired couples, or Aunt Mabel in the nursing home?

In so far as these figures relate to families with young children, they are way off base.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   CHILD CARE
Sub-subtopic:   A DEFENCE OF TRADITIONAL CANADIAN FAMILY-STATISTICS QUESTIONED
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AEROSPACE INDUSTRY

LIB

Jean-Claude Malépart

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Claude Malepart (Montreal-Sainte-Marie):

Mr. Speaker, as a Member of Parliament from the Montreal area, I would like to join and support the Montreal Economic Community, municipal authorities in Montreal, the Leader of the Parti Quebecois Mr. Pierre-Marc Johnson, and Quebec's Premier Mr. Robert Bourassa in saying unequivocally to the Prime Minister of Canada (Mr. Mulroney) that we do not and never will accept the argument being developed by the Conservative Government to justify their refusal to locate in Montreal the space agency, for the reason that the Government of Canada just helped save jobs at the GM plant in Sainte-Therese.

Mr. Speaker, it is important to remember that the grant extended by the Quebec Government is helping save the 5,000 jobs in Montreal, while the Federal grant is aimed at helping save 2,800 jobs in Ontario and create 2,600 new jobs.

In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, I say to this Tory Government that the whole Quebec population will unanimously refuse to be conned once more by this Tory Government.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S. O. 21
Subtopic:   AEROSPACE INDUSTRY
Sub-subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF CANADIAN SPACE AGENCY-POSITION OF QUEBEC
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April 3, 1987