May 10, 1985

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Don Boudria

Liberal

Mr. Don Boudria (Glengarry-Prescott-Russell):

Mr. Speaker, the Hon. Member for Charlevoix (Mr. Hamelin), who is a past master at this sort of thing, has brought an entirely new dimension to the patronage system in his riding.

The Hon. Member is refusing to negotiate with the municipal representatives elected by the people of the North Shore, and letting political organizers decide which municipalities may benefit from federal grants.

These organizers not only decide which municipalities are going to get the grants, they also oblige these municipalities to hire staff from a list of names they provide, the point being that the grants will be withdrawn if they do not comply.

Mr. Speaker, needless to say, the mayors in Charlevoix heartedly disapprove of the Hon. Member's approach and have sent him a letter to that effect, and I quote:

In recent months, since your election as the Member for the riding of Charlevoix, it has been noted by the mayors that the political organizers in each municipality, meaning those belonging to the party in power, take precedence over municipal representatives who, like yourself, were democratically elected.

1 would be curious to know how many ridings in Quebec are seeing the same patronage game being played by the Progressive Conservatives.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PATRONAGE IN CHARLEVOIX CONSTITUENCY
Permalink

FORESTRY

NDP

James Ross Fulton

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Fulton (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, in tribute to National Forestry Week, the New Democratic Party fully recognizes the importance of our forests to our economy and our communities. Canada's forests generate an industry worth $23 billion and contribute to our country's trade balance more than agriculture, mining, fishing, and petroleum combined. One in every ten jobs is dependent on our forests, and over 300 communities are solely dependent on the forests. On a world scale, Canada has more than 10 per cent of the woodland resource.

Despite the overwhelming value of our forests, through government neglect they are in a state of crisis. They are being mined rather than harvested. They are being attacked by acid rain. They are not being rejuvenated through replanting and intensive silvaculture. The federal Government spends less than a nickel on our forests for every dollar it extracts in taxes. We are like robbers looting our own bank account.

If the Government is ever to recognize the importance of our forest resource, it will appoint a full Minister of Forests rather than continue to bury the Canadian Forest Service somewhere deep within the Department of Agriculture. The New Democratic Party demands that the Government immediately embark upon broad-based consultations with the industry, communities, and workers that depend on our forests, and create a national forestry Act.

A national forestry Act would give a legal guarantee to all Canadians that our forests will be replenished so that they may flourish for future generations to enjoy and use. A national forestry Act would consolidate the federal responsibility that is now spread out among a dozen government Departments. A national forestry Act would address the needs of private woodlot owners, loggers, environmentalists, the industry, and communities which have no other economic base. A national forestry Act would ensure that Canada-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FORESTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SEPARATE DEPARTMENT ADVOCATED
Permalink
PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to advise the Hon. Member that his time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   FORESTRY
Sub-subtopic:   SEPARATE DEPARTMENT ADVOCATED
Permalink

CANADA POST CORPORATION

PC

Stan Darling

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, it has come to my attention that there is a gaping and dangerous loophole in the proposed postal increases as they appear in The Canada Gazette. The photography marketing industry in Canada could be devastated if third-class mail is replaced by first-class restrictions on packages measuring over two centimetres thick. The current mailing charge of $1.15 will soar to $4.19 or more to send a 35-millimetre film and have the photos returned.

This price spells disaster in an industry mailing packages with a billed price of between $6 and $9. Some 6,000 Canadians are employed in this $600 million a year industry, and

May 10, 1985

roughly $100 million of that is mail order business. The Photo Marketing Association International estimates that 500 jobs will be immediately wiped out if the mail increase for packages is approved. The crippling price hike would also give a great advantage to foreign mail order photo finishers who need not pay Canadian federal sales tax or customs duties.

The Government is committed to making life better for Canadians, not worse, so we must abort these cruel measures as they pertain to the photo marketing industry.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   IMPACT OF PROPOSED POSTAGE INCREASES ON PHOTOGRAPHY INDUSTRY
Permalink

BANK OF CANADA

PC

John Alexander Frances MacDougall

Progressive Conservative

Mr. John A. MacDougall (Timiskaming):

Mr. Speaker, in December I rose in the House and asked the Governor of the Bank of Canada to end the practice of subsidizing staff cafeterias at Bank of Canada offices across the country. The Bank's out of date pricing policy at these cafeterias has cost Canadian taxpayers over $2 million in the past five years.

I have since discovered that the prices in these cafeterias have doubled since April 1. However, I have also learned that Bank of Canada employees have been given a $250 raise to compensate for this price increase. This clearly defeats the whole purpose of raising the prices in the first place. In effect, any savings from any increase in cafeteria prices are going in one pocket and out the other.

This indirect subsidy to Bank of Canada employees will cost Canadians almost $500,000 per year. I urge the Governor of the Bank of Canada to stop this deplorable practice. I wish to remind him that it is not up to the people of Canada to ensure that Bank of Canada employees are well fed.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   BANK OF CANADA
Sub-subtopic:   CAFETERIA PRICES-SUBSIDIZATION OF EMPLOYEES
Permalink

CHARTER OF RIGHTS

LIB

John V. Nunziata

Liberal

Mr. John Nunziata (York South-Weston):

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seen its finest hour. Since 1867 our constitutional development as a nation has been shaped by numerous court cases which have had a dramatic impact on our society. Federal-provincial relationships, economic development, human rights, language, and culture have all been profoundly affected by court cases such as Russell v The Queen, The Queen v Drybones, and The Attorney General of Quebec v Blaikie. Yesterday a decision was handed down by the Supreme Court of Canada which places a very significant limitation on the use of executive power in Canada.

The Court ruled that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms is supreme and that Cabinet decisions are reviewable by the courts. The Charter's supremacy is now unquestioned. This landmark decision has blazed a constitutional trail which helps

define the relationship of the citizen, the state, and the Constitution.

U0)

This is a victory for Canadian civil liberties and a victory for Canadian civil rights. In every sense it is a victory for all Canadians. Operation Dismantle should be congratulated for its courage in challenging the Government of Canada, thus allowing the Supreme Court to render this momentous decision.

This organization now faces a substantial legal bill which threatens its continued existence. Because this court decision benefits all Canadians, I call on the Government of Canada to pay the legal costs in this case. It is indeed a small price to pay for what every Canadian has gained.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CHARTER OF RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   SUPREME COURT'S RULING ON REVIEW OF CABINET DECISIONS
Permalink
PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The Hon. Member's time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CHARTER OF RIGHTS
Sub-subtopic:   SUPREME COURT'S RULING ON REVIEW OF CABINET DECISIONS
Permalink

THE SENATE

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, to no one's surprise we have recently learned that there were no responses to a questionnaire circulated in the Senate by one of their own concerning the duties of a Senator. The invitation to justify their existence was met with, to quote the Senator who sent it around, "unanimous silence". All the more reason to abolish the Senate.

What the Government currently proposes is that the Senate be reduced, through limiting its power, to its essence, i.e., a house of political patronage. Gone will be the facade of real political power. Only the pork barrel will remain. Also gone will be anything left on which to justify the continued existence of the Upper Chamber, except the uses the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) has for it in making political pay-offs.

Perhaps the Prime Minister would be induced to abolish the Senate if we agreed to let him use it as his personal lounge. Given his recent refusal to stay in a hotel that was good enough for Cabinet Ministers but not for him, the presidential style of this Prime Minister is on the verge of becoming monarchial. The Senate Chamber would make a perfect place for the Prime Minister to retire in the evenings to enjoy his delusions of grandeur, a place where so many have been deluded by so little for so long.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE SENATE
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR ABOLITION
Permalink
?

Some Hon. Members:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE SENATE
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR ABOLITION
Permalink

THE ECONOMY

PC

Donald Paul Ravis

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Don Ravis (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, in the last few days we have seen the Bank of Canada rate fall below 10

May 10, 1985

per cent, a six-year low, and the Governor of the Bank of Canada is suggesting the possibility of much lower interest rates if the deficit is reduced. We have also seen, for the first time in decades, the reintroduction of mortgages with terms of seven to ten years. Our unemployment rate has fallen below 11 per cent, and we have had a significant increase in our trade surplus. In the first quarter of 1985 the Canadian economy grew at twice the rate of the United States.

On November 9 last, the Minister of Finance (Mr. Wilson), on behalf of the Government, put forward the agenda for economic renewal. Many decisions that have been taken in the past seven months have not been easy ones. There are no simple, quick solutions to a legacy of financial ineptitude. There will be further hard decisions made in the upcoming Budget. The balanced approach to reducing our debt will be fair and equitable to all regions of Canada. Less debt means more jobs.

The country is responding with confidence to the leadership of the Government. Confidence is growing, confidence that through the principles of the work ethic and less government hand-outs, economic recovery can be achieved, at the same time being confident that this can be achieved while ensuring that those in need are cared for. This is what the Progressive Conservative Government is all about.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Sub-subtopic:   REDUCTIONS IN INTEREST AND MORTGAGE RATES
Permalink

THE AUDITOR GENERAL

PC

François Gérin

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Francois Gerin (Megantic-Compton-Stanstead):

Thank you for recognizing me, Mr. Speaker. My remarks are directed to an official of this House whose behaviour astonishes me and, as I see it, belittles his important responsibilities. According to the Auditor General Act, the Auditor General shall report annually to the House of Commons and its Members on the work of his office and on whether, in carrying on the work of his office, he received all the information and explanations he required.

He must discharge his duties respecting fully our laws, our customs and our Canadian traditions.

Resorting to the courts without such specific instructions was definitively not the best nor the cheapest approach Mr. Dye could have taken to fulfil his duties. His personal decision to hire former Members to lobby through elected Members of this House, and the fact that these are Liberal Party members add insult to injury since the latter are not particularly conversant with accounting principles. The Auditor General truly overstepped his authority. In so doing he may have shown a propensity for grand-standing and sensationalism, or wanted to challenge openly the Conservative Government. Most certainly, such action lessens the confidence of the House in this

Oral Questions

official and, by the same token, undermines the institution he represents.

Just before graduating from Montreal's Ecole des hautes etudes commerciales-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE AUDITOR GENERAL
Sub-subtopic:   HIRING OF FORMER LIBERAL MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
Permalink

May 10, 1985