May 8, 1985

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

CANADA POST CORPORATION

PC

John Kenneth Gormley

Progressive Conservative

Mr. John Gormley (The Battlefords-Meadow Lake):

Mr. Speaker, millions of Canadians have finished filing this year's income tax returns. They sent their tax forms in by the April 30 deadline.

However, one businessman in northwestern Saskatchewan was waiting for a receipt he required to complete his tax form. The receipt that he needed was mailed from Toronto, postmarked March 13. He waited and he waited. Finally the receipt arrived in Battleford, Saskatchewan, 49 days later, on May 1, one day after the tax deadline.

At a time when many Canadians are growing increasingly frustrated with their Post Office, and while this same Post Office asks Canadian citizens and businesses to pay more for their postage, many ask why. I urge the Cabinet to consider very carefully the increase in postal rates requested by the Post Office.

The cost of mail is significant, particularly for small businesses. The public would not be expected to shoulder the burden of removing the deficit of a Crown corporation that sometimes provides questionable service. If the Post Office does not perform adequately, then Canadians should not have to pay more for less.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA POST CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   OPPOSITION TO PROPOSED POSTAGE RATE INCREASES
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INDIAN AFFAIRS

LIB

Sheila Finestone

Liberal

Mrs. Sheila Finestone (Mount Royal):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Quebec native women I make the following statement.

Indian women have had enough of the Government of Canada's refusing them the most fundamental of human rights. Indian women seek justice which they have never known since the arrival of the Indian Act in 1869. There have been one hundred years of misfortune for and injustice to those who married a non-Indian. This law, which was imposed on

them by a non-Indian government, puts control on their most fundamental human rights, and creates divisions within their families.

For those who have married a non-Indian, this law takes away their identity, the possibility of transmitting this identity to their children, the right to live in their communities, and even the right to be buried within their communities. By this same law, which comes from the federal Government, nonIndian women who marry Indian men acquire Indian status.

The federal Government, in an effort to repair these injustices, finally introduced a bill, Bill C-31, which could have re-established the full rights of Indian women and their children. However, the committee which was mandated to study this Bill has proposed amendments which are contrary to the spirit of the Bill by putting limitations on the rights of Indian women, and has refused to consider amendments which would have guaranteed the right of Indian identity for their children.

They have had enough. They insist that justice be rendered to them. They insist that the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) act now. Bill C-31 must ensure full rights to women and their children.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   STATUS OF INDIAN WOMEN
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VIA RAIL

NDP

Nelson Andrew Riis (N.D.P. Caucus Chair)

New Democratic Party

Mr. Nelson A. Riis (Kamloops-Shuswap):

Mr. Speaker, the Government of Canada recently took steps to reinstitute regular western VIA Rail service between Edmonton and Vancouver, which includes the scenic and much travelled tourist corridor between Jasper and Kamloops, British Columbia.

This decision enabled the local communities to develop local tourism infrastructure projects. The critical component in this long awaited development process is the existing passenger train stations in the communities located within this corridor. However, VIA and CN are considering closing stations at Valemount, Blue River, and Clearwater, which woud seriously inhibit these communities in their tourism development.

Therefore I urge the Minister of Transport (Mr. Mazan-kowski) to intervene and take whatever action is necessary to ensure that these stations remain intact so that passengers travelling along this scenic corridor will have the opportunity to access local tourist areas, which will enhance not only VIA's attractiveness but help provide local economic development and jobs.

May 8, 1985

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   VIA RAIL
Sub-subtopic:   REINSTITUTION OF SERVICE BETWEEN EDMONTON AND VANCOUVER
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HORTICULTURE

PC

Elliott William Hardey

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Elliott Hardey (Kent):

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HORTICULTURE
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT ON INSPECTION FEES
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AIRPORTS

LIB

Marie Thérèse Rollande Killens

Liberal

Mrs. Therese Killens (Saint-Michel-Ahuntsic):

Mr. Speaker, what happens to Mirabel Airport will have a vital impact on the economy of the Montreal area and that of the rest of Quebec.

The Government ought to decide as soon as possible what it intends to do about Mirabel. Several Members of this House are concerned about what the Government will decide, and 1 think it is entirely unacceptable that the Government should refuse to announce whether it will approve expansion of the airport in Toronto or try to give Mirabel a certain status.

All parties concerned in this matter agree that Mirabel is the perfect location for an international airport, that it and is well suited to future expansion. There are no obstacles to expanding Mirabel, except the Government's inertia which is preventing it from making a decision. The people of Quebec and Montreal are waiting for a decision by the Government, and I think this Government is demonstrating its indifference to their expectations.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   AIRPORTS
Sub-subtopic:   FUTURE OF MIRABEL
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NATIONAL RESOURCES

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, there has been a lot of attention paid recently to the so-called Grand Canal proposal, whereby the theory is that James Bay would be dammed, turned into a freshwater lake, and water diverted back south into and beyond the Great Lakes to points in the United States.

This proposal, earlier regarded as too bizarre to be accorded much credibility, has been given some credibility lately by the Prime Minister's (Mr. Mulroney) approval of water exports by tanker from his own riding, and his subsequent silence on the broader issue of water diversion for export which the Grand Canal project raises. Perhaps the silence is intended to complement the promotion of the Grand Canal scheme by the Prime Minister's old friend, Quebec Liberal Leader Robert Bourassa, whose enthusiasm for this massive act of technological hubris and ecological insanity seems to know no bounds.

The federal Liberal caucus, on the other hand, speaks with two voices. The Member for Grand Falls-White Bay-Labrador (Mr. Rompkey) thinks it is a great idea, while the Member for Davenport (Mr. Caccia) appears to be against it. The Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Turner) thinks it should be studied.

Canadian waters are not ours to sell. In this sense, opposition to such a diversion is not to be seen as selfishness but as good stewardship of that which has been entrusted to us and of the ecological and planetary context in which our Arctic and northern waters need to be considered.

Americans, like Canadians, should look first to what can be done in terms of water quality improvement and water conservation. They would be surprised what we could do if the political will were there on both sides of the border. Unfortunately it does not seem to exist at this time.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL RESOURCES
Sub-subtopic:   GRAND CANAL PROPOSAL
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NATIVE PEOPLES

NDP

John Edmund Parry

New Democratic Party

Mr. John Parry (Kenora-Rainy River):

Native communications societies throughout Canada are suffering a severe hiatus because of the Government's failure to date to approve any form of advance funding for the 1985-86 fiscal year.

These societies perform a valuable and essential function for native Canadians, and enrich the ethnocultural mosaic for all of us.

If present uncertainties are allowed to continue, the state of anxiety and confusion permeating the directors and staff will deepen, impairing further their effectiveness and enthusiasm.

The Government must learn to play fair with the agencies it funds. Delay is a form of denial. Numerous bodies wonder if it

May 8, 1985

is being used now to identify those programs which could later be cut without too much political backlash. It is time for the Government to put its money where the Prime Minister's April 18 statement directs.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIVE PEOPLES
Sub-subtopic:   FUNDING OF COMMUNICATION AGENCIES
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SMALL BUSINESS

PC

Mary Collins

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Mary Collins (Capilano):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in a speech to the Ottawa Social Planning Council, the Executive Director of the Canadian Council on Social Development cautioned Canadians about the role that small business could play in developing long-term employment and economic opportunities. Let me say I disagree, and I point to the facts.

For the past ten years over 70 per cent of new job creation in this country has been in the small business sector. Small business is responsible for 40 per cent of all employment, and for between 55 per cent and 60 per cent of private sector employment. Women now own 29 per cent of small businesses and are creating small businesses at three times the rate of men. Small business is also the largest employer of the youth of our country.

Yes, small business may not pay the highest wages, have long-term pensions, and job security, but Canadians with ideas and independence seek out the small business sector to fulfil their dreams. Many of the innovations and new products of our society are founded in garages or small laboratories, and grow into thriving small enterprises.

I can assure Canadians that this Government stands solidly behind the small business sector. Challenge '85 is a good example. We will continue to review our policies and laws, whether in the fields of taxation, pension reform, or encouragement of our financial institutions to meet the needs of small enterprises, to respond and to enhance the future contribution of small business to create jobs and keep the Canadian economy growing.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   SMALL BUSINESS
Sub-subtopic:   CAPACITY TO CREATE JOBS
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PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The Hon. Member's time has expired.

[ Translation]

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   SMALL BUSINESS
Sub-subtopic:   CAPACITY TO CREATE JOBS
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HOUSING

LIB

Jean-Claude Malépart

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Claude Malepart (Montreal-Sainte-Marie):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, in answer to one of my questions, the Minister responsible for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation said that I was not familiar with the programs I had mentioned to him. In Hansard, I mentioned to the Minister the "Programme canadien de renovation et de construction de logement locatif et de logement social". I realize the Minister is not familiar with the French language, so I

Presence in Gallery

suggest he check the briefing papers provided by his Department. In English, the "regime de construction de logement locatifs" is: Canada Rental Supply Plan, and "logement social" is Social Housing.

Mr. Speaker, I would therefore suggest that the Minister brush up on his programs before answering questions, so that he can give the right answers.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   HOUSING
Sub-subtopic:   MINISTER'S KNOWLEDGE OF PROGRAMS
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May 8, 1985