May 3, 1985

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Jean-Robert Gauthier (Chief Opposition Whip; Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Robert Gauthier (Ottawa-Vanier):

Mr. Speaker, the Liberal Party is alive and well and proving in Ontario that the path of moderation is the new direction Canadians want from government. The Liberal victory in Ontario-and it is a victory as more people voted Liberal than Tory-is a victory of the common person over the big machine. It is a victory of every-day people over a regime that thrives on patronage and polls. The people of Ontario refuse to turn back the clock to allow right-wing Conservatism to undo the progress of people politics and social responsibility.

The people of Ontario made it clear that they want a Government that will look after their needs and interests rather than be a bit player in orchestrated love-ins manipulated by the boss of all Tory bosses, in Ottawa. Tory platitudes will not be accepted as a disguise for boardroom policies or no policies at all. Only one Party offers the dynamic leadership and meaningful programs which can seriously address unemployment and economic development in a manner that is fair and equitable to all. That Party, of course, is the Liberal Party of Ontario.

The days of Tory Government composed of yes men with vested interests are over in Ontario. At the same time, the sands of time are beginning to run out on the Tory Government in Ottawa.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PROVINCIAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   ONTARIO ELECTION RESULTS
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CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION

NDP

Daniel James Macdonnell Heap

New Democratic Party

Mr. Dan Heap (Spadina):

Mr. Speaker, Canada's co-operative housing movement is being undermined by the combined actions of the Minister of Labour (Mr. McKnight), who is responsible for housing, and of some private-profit builders. Last year the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney), who was then Leader of the Official Opposition, blasted the Liberal Government for cutting co-op housing allocations by 40 per cent. At that time he said:

The Progressive Conservative Party finds it inexcusable that the Liberal Government should cut back funds for the co-operative housing program .. . Co-operative housing will continue to have a high priority in Progressive Conservative policy for housing.

What a phoney. The Minister of Labour has already cut co-op housing funding. In Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia, CMHC is cancelling co-op projects. These projects are mostly sound ones begun by well established co-op groups with a good record of producing housing within CMHC budgets. Yet, after encouraging these groups to spend their volunteer time and in some cases enter into contracts to buy land or to build, CMHC has suddenly cancelled approval for the projects.

After CMHC approval is cancelled, housing allocations seem to be handed over to fly-by-night, so-called non-profit groups which have cosy relationships with private-profit builders. Shame on the Prime Minister for flagrantly breaking his election promise and for helping to destroy the co-op housing movement in Canada.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
Sub-subtopic:   FUNDING OF CO-OPERATIVE HOUSING
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CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

PC

Patrick Dermott Crofton

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Patrick Crofton (Esquimalt-Saanich):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to bring to the attention of the House the fact that tomorrow will mark a very important anniversary in Canada's history. On May 4, 1910, fully 75 years ago, this House, speaking for the people of Canada, gave assent to the Naval Service Act which brought the Naval Service of Canada into existence. Only four years later this fledgling service was called upon to defend Canada in ships that, although past their prime, were manned with great skill and courage.

In World War II Canada's navy reached its peak, with over 400 ships and 100,000 men and women in its ranks. It was the world's third largest navy and was unsurpassed in bravery and courage. During the five and a half long years of that struggle which is known as the Battle of Atlantic, Canada's navy helped keep open the vital North Atlantic sea lanes, frequently in terrible weather, against a determined enemy. To this battle Canada gave 1,800 gallant sailors and 24 proud ships.

Then came Korea, and once again Canadian sailors served their country with great courage. In the ensuing years our navy continues to play an important role in the North Atlantic alliance.

May 3, 1985

As the Member for Esquimalt-Saanich, and as a former member of this illustrious service, I call on the House to recognize officially the 75th anniversary of the Naval Service of Canada, and to express unanimously its gratitude to the men and women of our navy, both past and present, for their contribution to our country.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Sub-subtopic:   NAVAL SERVICE'S SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY
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CURRENCY

PC

Dave Nickerson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, in order to divert the attention of the House from some rather disappointing, if temporary, setbacks in the Province of Ontario, I have a burning question that I wish to bring to its attention. The question, Sir, is why are nickels bigger than dimes? When nickels were made of nickel and dimes were made of silver, this made sense. But today both coins are made from baser metals.

The subcommittee looking into the possible issuance of a dollar coin, a move which I strongly favour, has demonstrated its prowess in coinage matters. Perhaps after finishing its appointed task its talents could be applied to examining other coinage issues such as the one just mentioned. Another might be the future of the copper penny. Do we really need pennies? If so, should they continue to be made of expensive copper, an increase in price of which might lead to the hoarding and melting down of these coins?

The opportunity exists for a thorough revision of our coinage and the development of a logical and distinctively Canadian coinage system.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CURRENCY
Sub-subtopic:   COINAGE-SIZE OF NICKELS AND DIMES
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SOCIAL SECURITY

LIB

Jean-Claude Malépart

Liberal

Mr. Jean-Claude Malepart (Montreal-Sainte-Marie):

Mr. Speaker, for many months I have been asking the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) and the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Epp) to stop their unjust treatment of needy Canadians between the ages of 60 and 64 who are being denied the spouse's allowance just because they are single, separated or divorced.

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of National Revenue (Mr. Beatty) informed the House last week that more than 1,000 people earning $100,000 or more do not pay a cent of income tax in Canada, which means an increase of 33 per cent over 1982. In addition, 6,000 people with an income of between $50,000 and $99,000 do not pay a cent of income tax in

Canada, which is 4,000 more than in 1982. And 6,700 people earning between $40,000 and $49,000 do not pay a cent of tax in Canada either, and this is 5,201 more than in 1982.

Mr. Speaker, I would urge all the Members of the House to ask the Prime Minister, the Minister of Finance (Mr. Wilson) and the Minister of social injustice in Canada to impose a minimum tax on people in the wealthiest groups, so that we can then extend the spouse's allowance to all elderly Canadians who are single and in need. The anti-social measures the Federal Conservatives want to take are similar to the ones that helped the Liberals win the popular vote in Ontario yesterday.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   SOCIAL SECURITY
Sub-subtopic:   RECOMMENDATION THAT SPOUSE'S ALLOWANCE BE EXTENDED TO SINGLE ELDERLY PERSONS IN NEED
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SOCIAL SECURITY

NDP

Michael Morris Cassidy

New Democratic Party

Mr. Mike Cassidy (Ottawa Centre):

Mr. Speaker, roughly 28,000 Quebec senior citizens had their old age security cheques reduced to the minimum this month and did not get any income supplement because they did not return the required application form before March 31.

Although they will get their supplement retroactively once the application has been received, many of these elderly people will have a hard time finding enough money to buy food or pay rent. The Government must see to it that administrative delays resulting from applications being received after the deadlines are reduced to a minimum. Instead of withholding the supplement in future, the Government would be better advised to send a cheque reduction notice to people who fail to return the application form one month before the deadline. The elderly would then be spared the unpleasant surprise of a sudden income drop.

In the case of a person living alone, Mr. Speaker, the supplement can amount to $328 a month, or half the monthly income of the needy. Obviously, such a loss of income takes its toll on the elderly. We ought to realize that such administrative procedures are not always readily understood by older people. Mr. Speaker, it is better to tailor bureaucratic requisites to the special needs of older Canadians than to make them put up with Government red tape.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   SOCIAL SECURITY
Sub-subtopic:   ADMINISTRATIVE DIFFICULTIES ENCOUNTERED BY THE ELDERLY
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DISARMAMENT

PC

John Barry Turner

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Barry Turner (Ottawa-Carleton):

Mr. Speaker, my wife and I have three beautiful children, and I said during the election campaign that if I do nothing more during my term as a public person than to keep our world free of a nuclear

May 3, 1985

holocaust so that our children can fulfil their lives, then I will have succeeded.

I have seen the Sowetos of South Africa, the poverty of Bombay, the dying of Ethiopia. I have seen the discipline of Japan, the down underness of New Zealand, the confidence of the U.S.A., and I can assure you, this House, and this country, that people are the same all over the world. Food and water, shelter and warmth, education and medical care, security and love, whether a housewife in the Soviet Union or a nursing mother in Same, Tanzania; whether black, yellow, white or mixed origins, the needs of these people are fundamentally exactly the same as ours.

1 have lived their needs and 1 have been a daily part of their personal priorities. As a civilized, educated, and learned people, we can only come to one conclusion, one conclusion that easterners, westerners, northerners, and southerners, developed and developing, must all share; one conclusion that will put us on a track to sanity, peace, and world security; one conclusion that should, must, and will be unanimous, the conclusion that continued nuclear armament is total madness.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   DISARMAMENT
Sub-subtopic:   WORLD-WIDE NEED OF PEOPLES
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PARLIAMENT HILL

PC

Ted William Schellenberg

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ted Schellenberg (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, politicians love statues and pigeons love statues, but it appears that the former Government had little love for certain statues. Last week it was revealed in the press that the Right Hon. Lester Pearson had commissioned four statues as part of Canada's centennial celebration in 1967. Two Liberal Prime Ministers were to be honoured, Mackenzie King and St. Laurent, and two Conservative Prime Ministers, Bennett and Meighen. Oddly enough, only the Liberal statues made it to Parliament Hill; the others were either rejected in model form or stored away upon completion.

The old saying goes that "nobody ever raised a statue to a critic", so I do not want to appear too critical today. Nor would I want to see Parliament Hill overrun with too many monuments. However, I think it is important to support the proposal of my colleague from Scarborough Centre that a memorial be erected in honour of one of the country's greatest Prime Ministers, the Right Hon. John Diefenbaker.

S)

Perhaps it might also be timely to raise a memorial to that other, more recent Prime Minister, the one who goes for long walks in the snow. I strongly suggest that such a statue, with all the fingers in the right place, be erected in Salmon Arm, British Columbia.

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Oral Questions

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PARLIAMENT HILL
Sub-subtopic:   ERECTION OF DIEFENBAKER STATUE ADVOCATED
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ORAL QUESTION PERIOD

ECONOMIC SUMMIT

LIB

Donald James Johnston

Liberal

Hon. Donald J. Johnston (Saint-Henri-Westmount):

Mr. Speaker, in the aftermath of yesterday's election in Ontario 1 can understand why the Deputy Prime Minister is not radiating his usual good humour and benevolence. In fact there is a rumour around to the effect that he lost a substantial bet to his very Liberal brother, Leslie.

To turn to the matters before us today, the Prime Minister's office has been promoting the absurd fiction that the Prime Minister has more credibility in the international arena than Pierre Elliott Trudeau. I suggest to the Deputy Prime Minister that that is much like comparing a college freshman to a learned and wise professor or, in a hockey analogy, a Johnston to a Gretsky.

The Prime Minister's actions during his current trip have left Canadians concerned and dumbfounded. Would the Deputy Prime Minister explain to the House what possible reason Canada's Prime Minister could have for rudely rejecting an invitation to meet with Prime Minister Nakasone of Japan to discuss economic issues of mutual concern? What on earth are these economic summits for? Can the Deputy Prime Minister explain the inexplicable to Canadians?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   ECONOMIC SUMMIT
Sub-subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S ATTENDANCE-INVITATION TO MEET JAPANESE PRIME MINISTER
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May 3, 1985