May 2, 1985

UNITED STATES-IMPOSITION OF TRADE EMBARGO ON NICARAGUA

NDP

James Douglas Manly

New Democratic Party

Mr. Jim Manly (Cowichan-Malahat-The Islands):

Mr. Speaker, Canadians heaved a small sigh of relief yesterday at the news that we would not be going along with the American embargo on trade with Nicaragua.

President Reagan's failure to consult, or even to notify the Canadian Government, should tell us that it is very difficult to be a paranoid's best friend. President Reagan's bully-boy tactics do not even reflect the majority American opinion as expressed in the resounding House of Representative's defeat of his $14 million program to help right-wing rebels. President Reagan's cowboy diplomacy poses a grave threat, not only to the fragile economy of Nicaragua, but also to the equally fragile stability and peace of our world.

Canada has a responsibility to tell President Reagan that we do not support his fantastic goal of overthrowing the Nicaraguan Government. Rather, we should increase our aid to the people of Nicaragua and take immediate action to widen our trade. Let us tell the people of Nicaragua that we are indeed open for business.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   UNITED STATES-IMPOSITION OF TRADE EMBARGO ON NICARAGUA
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NATIONAL FOREST WEEK

CHOICE OF GRANDE PRAIRIE AS ALBERTA FOREST CAPITAL

PC

Albert Glen Cooper

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Albert Cooper (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to inform my hon. colleagues that next week is National Forest Week, making forestry the focus for many celebrations across Canada. These festivities will provide Canadians with an understanding of the resource and its benefits. It is time for

May 2, 1985

Canadians to appreciate our forest resource and to learn more about it.

I am particularly proud that the City of Grande Prairie in my riding has been chosen as this year's capital of Alberta. I will be with the Minister of State for Forestry (Mr. Merri-thew) this weekend as he presides at events in my own riding and in other communities throughout Saskatchewan and Alberta. The forest is a vital element in these communities. It provides economic, recreational, and ecological benefits.

As a nation we have been blessed with the wealth from this resource for centuries. Only recently we have realized the importance of preserving it through proper management, reforestation, protection against insects, disease, and forest fires, and through the use of improved forestry methods.

To mark these festivities the Minister of State for Forestry and the Forestry Service will provide Hon. Members of the House and members of the Parliamentary Press Gallery with a seedling of a genetically improved white spruce. This is our chance, through the care of this fragile gift, to show our concern and support for forestry in Canada.

In closing, I urge Hon. Members of the House to support the activities of National Forest Week taking place in their communities.

Topic:   NATIONAL FOREST WEEK
Subtopic:   CHOICE OF GRANDE PRAIRIE AS ALBERTA FOREST CAPITAL
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FORESTRY

SUBAGREEMENT WITH QUEBEC ON FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT

PC

Michel Champagne

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Michel Champagne (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, on April 30, 1985, the Canada-Quebec subagreement on forestry development was signed. Under that agreement, both Governments will promote forestry development in order to increase the availability of that resource, and foster the setting up of basic nursery equipment and, of course, of research facilities. This is a $300 million agreement over the five next years.

As you know, Mr. Speaker, for too long we have felt that our natural resources were inexhaustible. For too long we have utilized our forests without carrying out any real policy. This agreement is the trademark of a responsible Government. And believe me, the constituency of Champlain will derive more than significant benefits from it.

Mr. Speaker, in Quebec forestry is one of the main sources of jobs. And since 1970, the number of jobs has been on a steady decline. From 14,815 that it was in 1970, it decreased to 8,994 in 1982, in logging operations alone.

To conclude, I am proud that we now have a forestry policy, and this means jobs. This also means an insurance policy on that national resource, because this Government will safeguard the heritage we will be leaving to the younger generations.

Topic:   FORESTRY
Subtopic:   SUBAGREEMENT WITH QUEBEC ON FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT
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?

An Hon. Member:

Hear, hear!

Topic:   FORESTRY
Subtopic:   SUBAGREEMENT WITH QUEBEC ON FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT
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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

NEWFOUNDLAND FISHERMEN-EXPIRATION OF BENEFITS


Mr. Brian Tobin (Humber-Port au Port-St. Barbel: Mr. Speaker, I rise to support the statement made by the Hon. Member for Grand Falls-White Bay-Labrador (Mr. Romp-key). Indeed the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (Mr Fraser) knows that the situation in Newfoundland this year with respect to ice conditions is almost unprecedented. The Minister knows that all along the great northern peninsula, the White Bay region of the province, and on the northeast coast, severe winter conditions are still being experienced and that we have pack ice going off the coast for miles. Also he knows that in 1984, and indeed in 1974, special incentives or payments were provided to fishermen who were unable to acquire an income at this time of the year because their unemployment insurance expired on May 15. The Minister of Fisheries met with the President of the fishermen's union within the last 24 yours, who was here in Ottawa to underline the urgency of this matter. I ask him to respond through the House to all Canadians, and in particular to the people of Newfoundland who really have no other form of income to which to turn, as quickly as possible, in respect of this matter. I know the Minister has the welfare and well-being of fishermen at heart. I know he will be able to convince his Cabinet colleagues, particularly the Minister of Employment and Immigration (Miss MacDonald), to come forward with some kind of answer very soon. [DOT] * *


NATIONAL PARKS

RIDING MOUNTAIN-PROPOSED ROAD CONSTRUCTION

NDP

William Alexander (Bill) Blaikie

New Democratic Party

Mr. Bill Blaikie (Winnipeg-Birds Hill):

Mr. Speaker, all friends of Riding Mountain National Park, and those concerned with the preservation of our dwindling heritage of natural habitat, should be aware of a matter which poses a threat to the integrity of that park, the proposal by a Progressive Conservative MLA in Manitoba to construct a new road through the west end of the park.

Riding Mountain National Park is a world class heritage area. It is one of the richest, most diverse wilderness settings in North America, surrounded by intensive agricultural towns and villages. It is an island of wilderness, surrounded by human development. This home to thousands of elk, moose, deer, and beaver, dozens of wolves and coyotes, and the elusive lynx and cougar, is in its present healthy state because it has been protected by wise policies and laws over the past 50 years. We cannot permit this rich heritage to be violated by new roads into pristine wilderness areas. This road would disrupt vegetation and wildlife patterns, increase poaching and road kills, and increase the incidence of forest fires caused by the

May 2, 1985

carelessness of passersby. The integrity of such a rich natural wan exports is its ingenuity which contributes to Canada's environment in southern Canada should be kept intact. future prosperity.

*

[DOT] *

Topic:   NATIONAL PARKS
Subtopic:   RIDING MOUNTAIN-PROPOSED ROAD CONSTRUCTION
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FORESTRY

SUBAGREEMENT WITH QUEBEC ON FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT

PC

Gabriel Desjardins

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gabriel Desjardins (Temiscamingue):

Mr. Speaker, as my colleague from Champlain (Mr. Champagne) has done, I would like today to stress before this House the importance of the recent Canada-Quebec subagreement on forestry, which was signed this week in Quebec City. Indeed, on Tuesday, April 30, 1985, I had the privilege of attending with some of my Quebec colleagues the signing of the subagreement on forest development.

Mr. Speaker, this is the fifth regional economic development agreement to be reached between this Government and the Quebec Government. This shows how much this Government has succeeded in reinstating a fruitful dialogue with Quebec, to the benefit of both levels of government.

Our Minister of State for Forestry (Mr. Merrithew) has succeeded in reaching with his Quebec counterpart a historical agreement. Mr. Speaker, this new $300 million, five-year agreement is the best ever signed by Quebec and Canada. Of that amount $190 million will be allocated to public forest development and $90 million to private forest development, on the whole representing the creation of 16,000 person-years of work.

To conclude, Mr. Speaker, I would like to stress the importance of this agreement for the Abitibi-Temiscamingue area. This agreement, in addition to solving in our area the problems of supply, will have important economic spin-offs, both in terms of job creation and with respect to the millions of dollars that will be invested in my area.

Topic:   FORESTRY
Subtopic:   SUBAGREEMENT WITH QUEBEC ON FORESTRY DEVELOPMENT
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IMPORTANCE OF SASKATCHEWAN EXPORTS


I feel the excitement of future international trade potential growing in Saskatoon. The combination of the research genius of the university, the innovation of the private sector, and the commitment of all levels of government, provide a formula for the prosperity that translates into jobs for Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, and Canada. With the assistance of my colleagues in the new Government we can develop the tremendous international trade potential that exists in Saskatchewan. The initiative exemplifies the commitment of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) to get Canada going again and to get Canadians back to work. I applaud this initiative.


May 2, 1985