February 27, 1985

STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21

VISIBLE MINORITIES

LIB

Sergio Marchi

Liberal

Mr. Sergio Marchi (York West):

Mr. Speaker, the present standstill in the Japanese Canadian redress issue is most regrettable and unacceptable. In an attempt to re-establish a dialogue, the Japanese Canadian Association has been seeking a meeting with the Right Hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Mul-roney). Its search to date has been fruitless, and its deep frustration and disappointment were clearly demonstrated in a February 2 letter addressed to the Right Hon. Prime Minister.

The refusal of the Prime Minister to meet with the Association is difficult to comprehend. This is the same individual who gave this issue great importance during his days as Opposition Leader, and who demonstrated his commitment to redress repeatedly during the recent federal election campaign. Consequently, the Japanese Canadian community rightfully expected a process that would be completely open, genuine, and thorough. Instead it has received government imposed deadlines, unilateral government proposals, and a reversal on the Government's negotiations commitment. Now that process is at a deadlock. An uncomfortable and confusing silence prevails.

The Prime Minister promised emphatically that his office would be open and accessible. I urge him to prove that this promise is fact rather than fiction, by opening his doors to the Japanese Canadian Association. Only in this spirit will the redress issue have any chance of resolving itself.

The Association has met with our Party and with the NDP-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   VISIBLE MINORITIES
Sub-subtopic:   INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE CANADIANS DURING WORLD WAR II
Permalink
PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to advise the Hon. Member that his time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   VISIBLE MINORITIES
Sub-subtopic:   INTERNMENT OF JAPANESE CANADIANS DURING WORLD WAR II
Permalink

PETRO-CANADA UNJUSTIFIED INCREASES TO SMALL RETAILERS-IMPACT ON QUEBEC

PC

Vincent Della Noce

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Vincent Della Noce (Duvernay):

Mr. Speaker, I am rising in the House today to speak out, once again, against the unacceptable practices of Petro-Canada management who now expects Quebec station service operators to renew next year's leases at rates of 15 to 20 per cent higher than current leases.

I intend to draw the attention of my colleague the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (Miss Carney) and of the whole House to those unwarranted increases being forced upon small retailers by Petro-Canada. The situation is particularly serious in Quebec where gasoline prices are already higher than anywhere else. Since the 1984 inflation rate was only 4.4 per cent, I see no justification for Petro-Canada-it is ours, they keep telling us-to seek rent increases of about 15 per cent.

Time has come to ask for explanations from the management of this Crown corporation, and that is our responsibility. I am confident that we can indeed help small service station operators by putting a stop to the unquenchable thirst of Petro-Canada which is destroying those essential business enterprises by forgetting to behave as a good corporate citizen mindful of the will of its true owners, the consumers in Quebec and elsewhere.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   PETRO-CANADA UNJUSTIFIED INCREASES TO SMALL RETAILERS-IMPACT ON QUEBEC
Permalink

MULTICULTURALISM

NDP

Abram Ernest Epp

New Democratic Party

Mr. Ernie Epp (Thunder Bay-Nipigon):

Mr. Speaker, the new Canadian Multiculturalism Council announced last week by the Minister of State for Multiculturalism (Mr. Murta) is not the representative body it should be. Eighteen of the sixty members live in the Province of Ontario. Fifteen of those eighteen persons, a full quarter of the Canadian Multiculturalism Council, are residents of the Metro Toronto region.

Although Torontonians often regard themselves as the movers and shakers of our nation, their numbers represent a little more than one-tenth of the Canadian population. These demographic realities should not have been forgotten by a Minister from the Canadian west.

The fact that three persons are expected to represent all the Ontario ethnocultural realities outside Metro Toronto is par-

February 27, 1985

ticularly objectionable to my constituents and other residents in northwestern Ontario. They thought that the multicultural-ism directorate was preoccupied with metropolitan concerns in the past. These appointments will confirm them in their sense of neglect by successive Ministers of State for Multicultural-ism.

A concern that partisan politics will continue to dominate federal multicultural policies is encouraged by the fact that Sault Ste. Marie provides the sole northern Ontario member of the Council. Excellent candidates from the larger communities of Sudbury and Thunder Bay-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MULTICULTURALISM
Sub-subtopic:   MEMBERSHIP OF COUNCIL
Permalink
PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to advise the Hon. Member that his time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   MULTICULTURALISM
Sub-subtopic:   MEMBERSHIP OF COUNCIL
Permalink

THE SENATE

PC

Reginald Francis Stackhouse

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Reg Stackhouse (Scarborough West):

Mr. Speaker, accountability is one of the basics of democratic government. The Government of Canada is accountable to the House of Commons. This House is accountable to the electorate, but the other place is not accountable to anyone.

The Leader of the Opposition in the other place has said that he is not accountable to the Leader of his own Party for what happens there. Each member of his caucus is accountable only to his own conscience for what he does there, but nonetheless the other place asserts a legislative authority which affects not only the work of the Government but the well-being of Canada, and at a high cost.

The other place is not accountable to the people, but in the next fiscal year it will cost $26 million to operate, or about a quarter of a million dollars for each member of that place. If one member appointed last summer lives to retirement age, he will have cost taxpayers about $5 million for salaries, expenses, and the cost of his office. When they assert the authority they claim and cost the expense they incur, surely they ought to be accountable to someone.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   THE SENATE
Sub-subtopic:   NON ACCOUNTABILITY
Permalink

TOURISM

LIB

Fernand Robichaud

Liberal

Mr. Fernand Robichaud (Westmorland-Kent):

Mr. Speaker, since November this Government has been proposing one contradictory policy after another. As far as the tourist industry is concerned, the contradictions are particularly obvious. Allow me to explain. On December 12, 1984, the Minister of State for Tourism (Mr. McMillan) said, and I quote:

To provide a sound basis for Canada's tourist industry, we must establish an action plan aimed at making the entire industry more competitive, instead of having short term initiatives that are totally uncoordinated.

Since the Minister took up his duties, I have seen no such plan. In fact, it is his Government and his department that are proposing short term and uncoordinated initiatives.

I will give an example that involves the entire Canadian tourist industry and especially the Minister's own province, Prince Edward Island. A reporter of the "Journal Pioneer" made the following point, and I quote:

But while welcoming the increased injection of federal dollars into the tourism marketing process, it can't help but be noted that the Government is oddly inconsistent in its policies. On the one hand it spends money to attract tourists, while at the same time it continues to boost the price of gasoline, thereby putting in place a serious impediment-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   TOURISM
Sub-subtopic:   CONTRADICTORY ACTIONS AND DECISIONS BY GOVERNMENT
Permalink
PC

Martial Asselin (Speaker pro tempore)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I regret to advise the Hon. Member that his time has expired.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   TOURISM
Sub-subtopic:   CONTRADICTORY ACTIONS AND DECISIONS BY GOVERNMENT
Permalink

REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION

PC

Jean J. Charest (Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Jean J. Charest (Sherbrooke):

Mr. Speaker, it is with the utmost reluctance that I rise in the House today to speak under the provisions of Standing Order 21. When this House bestowed on me the privilege of serving as Acting Speaker, I agreed not to take part in debate out of deference to the House, to the Speaker's function and the Speaker himself, for whom I have the greatest respect.

Today, exceptionally, I wish to address the House on the Domtar case. My constituents find it very difficult to accept the Government's decision in this matter.

Like all Canadians, we realize that the Government's financial position is a precarious one, but we also know that in the Eastern Townships, high unemployment, vulnerable traditional industries and low average wages have been the rule for far too long.

We know the Domtar project to be an excellent one and particularly suited to a region which, in the course of a recent socio-economic summit, expressed its commitment to settling for nothing less than excellence. Today I want to say that we are determined to see the Domtar project carried out, for the well-being of the entire country.

The people of the Eastern Townships will feel encouraged today by the statement made by our Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) who promised to see whether other forms of assistance would be feasible, and they are prepared to work together through various task forces in order to ensure the Domtar project is carried out.

February 27, 1985

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION
Sub-subtopic:   DOMTAR-POSITION OF EASTERN TOWNSHIPS
Permalink

NATIONAL DEFENCE

NDP

Derek Nigel Ernest Blackburn

New Democratic Party

Mr. Derek Blackburn (Brant):

Mr. Speaker, it is probably too early to question the new Minister of National Defence (Mr. Nielsen) on the complex problems of his portfolio. We will leave that for tomorrow. However, the time is right to set out some of the issues he will have to deal with as soon as he gets his bearings. Here is a shopping list of changes and challenges we would like to see the Minister tackle.

First, the Minister will have to start an over-all policy review right away. We are committing ourselves to major purchases and untried strategies, without any sense of direction. Let us take a hard look at some of those expenditures. The Minister is certainly qualified to do that. We are rushing to get our sailors into new uniforms while their ships are stranded, either in drydock or on the drawing boards of engineers. Let's get our priorities straight.

At the same time we have to ask ourselves whether we are being sucked into dangerous new strategies. The new Minister should make it clear to everyone that Canada will have no part of nuclear weapons or of a defensive arms race in space. Loyalty demands that we speak out when our friends are making mistakes that could cost us all dearly. Unquestioning servitude does no one a service. Finally, the Minister should let everyone know that Canada threatens no one. We only seek to protect the democracy we hold so dearly.

If the Minister would undertake these challenges, he would certainly have our support and encouragement. Let us not let this opportunity slip by.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Sub-subtopic:   CALL FOR OVER ALL POLICY REVIEW
Permalink

BALTIC EVENING

PC

Mary Collins

Progressive Conservative

Mrs. Mary Collins (Capilano):

Mr. Speaker, tonight we celebrate the Thirteenth Annual Baltic evening on Parliament Hill when Canadians of Baltic heritage from across Canada join with parliamentarians in commemoration of the Independence Days of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia.

The desire for liberty and independence of the people of the Baltic nations remains alive and strong, and constitutes one of the best hopes for a just and lasting peace. Canadians are known internationally to possess an understanding and sympathy for the national and human rights aspirations of people throughout the world.

I believe it is fitting that we in this House clearly manifest to the people of the Baltic nations that the people of Canada share with them their aspirations for the recovery of their freedom, national independence, and human rights.

I am sure that all Canadians would want us to welcome the honorary consuls from the three Baltic states, Lithuania,

Oral Questions

Latvia, and Estonia, and the representatives of the Baltic communities in Canada who are here with us in Ottawa today.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   BALTIC EVENING
Sub-subtopic:   COMMEMORATION OF BALTIC STATES' INDEPENDENCE
Permalink

February 27, 1985